PODCAST: The Zipper Club Brings Their Punk Universe To Shaky Knees Festival

first_imgFollowing the most recent episode with Trey Anastasio Band’s Jennifer Hartswick, Live For Live Music Presents: Inside Out with Turner and Seth is back with a new episode featuring a rundown of the 2017 Shaky Knees Festival and a conversation with the three core members of new wave-inspired outfit Zipper Club.Turner and Seth discuss in length the Shaky Knees Festival, which takes place in Centennial Park in Atlanta, GA, and this year featured headliners from LCD Soundsystem, The XX, Cage the Elephant, Pixies, Portugal. The Man, Phoenix, Ryan Adams, next tier acts such as Moon Taxi, The Revivalists, Sylvan Esso, J. Roddy Walston & The Business, Dr. Dog, Saint Motel, and up and coming acts such as The Record Company, Rainbow Kitten Surprise, Con Brio, and the aforementioned Zipper Club. The festival, now in its fifth year, is hitting its stride as it continues to expand on a diverse lineup of acts from across the musical spectrum.You can listen to the new episode of Live For Live Music Presents: Inside Out with Turner and Seth below:During the formal interview section of the podcast, Turner and Seth discuss Mason James‘ former band Cerebral Ballzy, a NYC punk rock act that saw a fair deal of success over the years, and how James made the transition from a style with plenty of edge to a band that, as Turner describes it, “what happens when you have the sophistication of fine art meeting the raw passion of punk, and you throw in a little bit of synth-pop.”The group goes on to discuss working with former Smashing Pumpkins member and A Perfect Circle guitarist James Iha, who produced a number of tracks on their upcoming debut album. The first time they worked with Iha was in a dingy basement in Brooklyn, NY, and had an immediate connection which continued as the band wrote additional tracks for their forthcoming album.Zipper Club also opened up for Tears for Fears on their first tour ever, as the band had played with Curt Smith at Coachella, had become close friends with the band, and the opportunity to come out as the support act happened rather organically.Lissy Trullie, who grew up in New York City, and was an art and film student at Parsons and The New School explained, “For the record, I was a huge fan of punk….The Queers, The Exploited….I was a little punk.” With drummer Damar Davis, the trio was complete, and moved forward with James’ vision of exploring diverse musical genres outside of the punk universe.In the live setting, Zipper Club is making a point of creating a multi-sensory performance, with a full-on light show, as well as stretching songs out while on stage from an improvisational standpoint. James explains, “Look out for the future, we have been improvising a lot recently….we are trying to expand beyond that. You try to take it to different levels, you try to do different solos, and make it a unique experience for every viewer. Sometimes it goes wrong, sometimes it goes beautiful, it’s that weird awesome thing you get at a live rock n’ roll show.”James discusses why he was amped to play Shaky Knees, as Turner and Seth began to throw some jabs at other non-festival festival’s such as Coachella, which are more of a scene than anything else, “[Shaky Knees] is full of people that want to see music. It has been really refreshing. Everybody was so nice.”Explaining one of the craziest gigs James ever played at a punk show, he says, “So I was in the UK, and we did an entire photo shoot of us puking into Christmas things….puking into Santa hats. So I used to have to fucking puke on cue. That was our thing. It is not a cool thing, everybody listening, don’t do this, please. It’ll just give you acid reflux and fuck you up later in life. But, that was our shtick, so we had a whole photo shoot of us [Cerebral Ballzy] puking on Christmas in the UK.” Nobody said the punk life was easy.Turner also attempts to get the band to divulge the ultra secret information of how they came up with the band name. You’ll just have to listen to find out….**For more Inside Out With Turner And Seth episodes, head to their SoundCloud, iTunes, or Stitcher page. You can also email the podcast producers here to submit feedback which may be incorporated into future episodes!**You can check out past episodes of Live For Live Music Presents: Inside Out with Turner and Seth podcast below:Jen Hartswick Recounts Her Pinky Swear With Christian McBride, A Fateful Call From TreyDirty Heads Frontman Jared Watson Talks Weed, Colors, Addiction, And MoreWidespread Panic’s John “JoJo” Hermann Tells Studio Stories And MoreJason Crosby Talks Impromptu Performances With Prince And Bruce SpringsteenCol. Bruce Hampton Discusses Upcoming Star-Studded 70th Birthday BlowoutLos Lobos’ Steve Berlin Goes Back To His RootsBig Gigantic’s Dominic Lalli And Jeremy Salken Discuss Their Careers In EDMBenny Bloom & Tom Hamilton Get Us Excited For Fool’s ParadiseAl Schnier & Jim Loughlin Talk All Things moe.Umphrey’s McGee Engineer Chris Mitchell Discusses How He Captures The Band’s Unique SoundChris Kuroda Talks Evolution From Early Phish To MSGBrendan Bayliss Talks New Umphrey’s McGee Album, Career HighlightsJefferson Waful Talks Umphrey’s, Collaborating With Chris KurodaUM’s Brendan Bayliss Talks Band Origins, Meeting Steve Miller & Morelast_img read more

Spafford Announces Departure Of Drummer Cameron LaForest, Return Of Nick Tkachyk

first_imgSpafford took to their social media outlets on Tuesday night to announce a change to their current lineup. The four-piece rock outfit announced drummer Cameron LaForest will be leaving the band. In his place, the four-piece jam band originally from Arizona has decided to bring back longtime drummer Nick Tkachyk, who was initially with the group from 2011 until 2017.“After his 2 year hiatus, Nick is resuming his position on the throne and is back to bring the heat!” the band said in the statement shared to their Facebook on Tuesday evening. “Our first gig with him will be the late night Jazz Fest show. See y’all in New Orleans!”Spafford is set to head out on their Summer Vacation Tour starting a few weeks later with a show at Fine LineMinneapolis, MN on May 22nd. The summer tour is scheduled to continue until August 3rd with their appearance at the Summer Meltdown Festival in Darrington, WA. Fans can head to the band’s website for tickets and tour information.last_img read more

Alabama company to acquire Shoreham Telephone Company

first_imgOtelco,Otelco Inc. (NASDAQ: OTT)(TSX: OTT.un), a wireline telecommunications services provider in Alabama, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire and West Virginia, today announced it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Shoreham Telephone Company, Inc. for approximately $4.5 million in cash, subject to certain purchase price adjustments.‘The acquisition of Shoreham is a strategically important opportunity for Otelco to continue the expansion of our footprint in New England,’ said Mike Weaver, President and Chief Executive Officer of Otelco. ‘While Shoreham has similar roots to Otelco as a rural wireline telephone provider, its existing network in Vermont provides an excellent point from which our CLEC (OTT Communications) can begin serving our fourth state. We are very excited about this transaction and its impact as a catalyst for future growth.’Shoreham, located in Shoreham, Vermont, is a privately owned company that has provided telecommunications solutions to residential and business customers for nearly a century. The company offers a complete set of voice, data and Internet services to its customers in middle Vermont. For the year ended December 31, 2010, Shoreham generated approximately $2.4 million in total revenue and had 4,975 access line equivalents.Otelco plans to finance the acquisition from cash on its balance sheet. The acquisition is expected to close in 2011 following regulatory approvals.ABOUT OTELCOOtelco Inc. provides wireline telecommunications services in Alabama, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, New Hampshire and West Virginia. The Company’s services include local and long distance telephone, network access, transport, digital high-speed data and dial-up internet access, cable television and other telephone related services. With more than 99,000 voice and data access lines which are collectively referred to as access line equivalents, Otelco is among the top 25 largest local exchange carriers in the United States based on number of access lines. Otelco operates ten incumbent telephone companies serving rural markets, or rural local exchange carriers. It also provides competitive retail and wholesale communications services through several subsidiaries. For more information, visit the Company’s web site at www.OtelcoInc.com(link is external).FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTSStatements in this press release that are not statements of historical or current fact constitute forward looking statements. Such forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other unknown factors that could cause the timing of the acquisition to differ from that expressed by such forward-looking statements. In addition to statements which explicitly describe such risks and uncertainties, readers are urged to consider statements labeled with the terms ‘believes’, ‘belief,’ ‘expects,’ ‘intends,’ ‘anticipates,’ ‘plans,’ or similar terms to be uncertain and forward looking. The forward-looking statements contained herein are also subject generally to other risks and uncertainties that are described from time to time in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.ONEONTA, Ala.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–4.5.2011last_img read more

Hoornstra: For foreign-born baseball players, coronavirus presents unique challenges

first_img“It is extremely busy,” said Clifford Chin, Senior Counsel at Berry Appleman & Leiden. “Number one, it’s what information do we have? Number two, it’s assessing the various interpretations and risks. Number three, it’s the human element. Immigration isn’t just a business. It’s affecting peoples’ lives on a personal level.” In a hypothetical book about Sports and the Coronavirus, you can imagine each of those points deserving a chapter.Last Friday, for example, the acting director of the Department of Homeland Security issued an order exempting certain foreign professional athletes from entry restrictions. If you are not a citizen of the U.S., and you were physically present in China, Iran, the United Kingdom, Ireland, or most of the European mainland, you were barred from entering the U.S. for 14 days. The new order rescinds that ban for athletes, stating “that it is in the national interest to except aliens who compete in professional sporting events … including their professional staff, team and league leadership, spouses, and dependents.”Unless they are on vacation, those countries aren’t where you’ll typically find a baseball player spending his off-season. Last year, 105 players born in the Dominican Republic made an Opening Day roster. Venezuela (68), Cuba (19), Puerto Rico (18) and Mexico (8) followed. Japan and Canada (six each) produced the most players outside of Latin America.Those countries weren’t affected by the most recent ban. But it isn’t hard to imagine a sudden COVID-19 outbreak – such as the one that engulfed Brazil in May – making travel to the U.S. from certain regions less practical, even for a professional athlete.That’s more true for minor league players, who have been paid $400 a week since the season was officially suspended in March. Foreign players who receive seven-figure signing bonuses as teenagers steal the headlines, but they are in the minority. Most Latin American minor leaguers quickly flew home once the season was suspended, rather than remain in the U.S. and try to scrape by on their meager stipend. Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Angels fail to take series in Oakland, lose in 10 innings Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Still, the agent for a Nicaraguan pitcher told me that players there are feeling less risk-averse than their American counterparts. Baseball might be their year-round job, if they compete in a winter league. Money is scarce, and they might not be trained in another field of employment. A similar problem faces foreign-born minor leaguers in major league organizations once they’re released from their contract – or those in the Oakland A’s system, who won’t be receiving their weekly stipend beginning June 1.“There will be a lot of kids not making a dime,” the agent told me. “What else do they know?”Minor league baseball players aren’t represented by a union. Neither are most players who compete only in the Latin American leagues. Still, their examples serve as a reminder of the unique interests facing the hundreds of major league players who call a foreign country home in the off-season. Now, with the potential for a season to re-start in June with expanded rosters, attitudes are changing. But flights into the U.S. from Latin America are more scarce. One agent I spoke with this week represents a minor league client who will attempt to leave Panama on a humanitarian flight in June.Several agents I spoke with noted that Venezuelan players fall in a category of their own. In March, president Nicolas Maduro was indicted in United States federal court on three separate conspiracy charges – the latest wrinkle in the country’s political turmoil. With players reluctant to return home under these circumstances, many have been living and training at their team complexes in the Dominican Republic. At least one Venezuelan minor leaguer has been living with his minor league manager in the U.S.Consider the players’ families too. This became a sticking point early in negotiations between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association, when the league proposed quarantining players in a centralized location for an entire season. MLB’s most recent proposal to the union wouldn’t keep players apart from their families during the hypothetical 2020 season. But what if your family lives overseas during the off-season and was planning to relocate for six months? What if the season isn’t six months long anymore?As one agent told me, “A couple of my guys have said, ‘if we’re going to play three months, I’m not going to bring my wife and kids. They can be home and stay safe. Why have them stuck at a house or a hotel?’ Every guy’s going to be different on that.”Back to those various tiers of risk. A cardiologist in the Dominican Republic reportedly sampled 314 residents of Villa Juana, a neighborhood in the capital city of Santo Domingo. Forty percent of the tests came back positive for Covid-19, a number that was disputed by the country’s minister of health.Even if the actual rate of infection is lower on a city-, district-, or nation-wide level, the report contributed to doubts over the accuracy of state-reported testing in Latin American countries. Earlier this month, an outbreak of COVID-19 in Nicaragua forced the postponement of that country’s baseball season. Several players tested positive. One coach, Carlos Aranda, died from the disease.Related Articlescenter_img Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter The novel coronavirus had the potential to unite the world around a common enemy. In the United States, that potential quickly disintegrated. Race, age, geography, and occupational-based hazards divided us into various tiers of risk. Some of us protested. Some of us lost our jobs, or sizable portions of our paychecks. Others – reportedly 100,000 and counting – have died as a result of COVID-19.Sports usually serves as a distraction from these kinds of headlines. Now, it is serving as a microcosm of how a not-so-common enemy strikes us all differently.Each Opening Day, Major League Baseball issues a press release detailing where its players come from. Last year, a total of 251 players represented 20 different countries and territories outside of the United States. Minor league rosters are no less diverse. So what happens to players when the United States closes its borders entirely to certain countries? Or when a foreign country closes its borders altogether, as is the case in the Dominican Republic?If you’re an immigration attorney who represents MLB teams and athletes, what happens is you get inundated with questions. Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire last_img read more