Members Of The Motet, Mofro, and Sister Sparrow To Perform Bonnie Raitt Tribute In Denver

first_imgSinger Emily Clark will be performing a special tribute to legendary blues singer/guitarist Bonnie Raitt tomorrow night in Denver, CO at Cervantes Other Side. “Tangled & Dark” – A Tribute To Bonnie Raitt will feature Clark bringing along drummer Dave Watts (The Motet), bassist Todd Smallie (JJ Grey & Mofro), guitarist Sasha Brown (Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds), and singers Tanya Shylock, LaDamion Massey and Phil Johnson.Satsang will provide opening support, while Hymn For Her will keep the night rolling along after the tribute set, for what is sure to be a special dedication to one of the most iconic female musician’s of the 20th century. Tickets for the show are $10.To purchase tickets, click here.Check the Facebook Event Group here.last_img read more

Coronavirus bringing record $1t of new global corporate debt in 2020: Report

first_imgCompanies around the world will take on as much as US$1 trillion of new debt in 2020, as they try to shore up their finances against the coronavirus, a new study of 900 top firms has estimated.The unprecedented increase will see total global corporate debt jump by 12 percent to around $9.3 trillion, adding to years of accumulation that has left the world’s most indebted firms owing as much as many medium-sized countries.Last year also saw a sharp 8 percent rise, driven by mergers and acquisitions, and by firms borrowing to fund share buybacks and dividends. But this year’s jump will be for an entirely different reason – preservation as the virus saps profits. “COVID has changed everything,” said Seth Meyer, a portfolio manager at Janus Henderson, the firm that compiled the analysis for a new corporate debt index. “Now it is about conserving capital and building a fortified balance sheet”.Companies tapped bond markets for $384 billion between January and May, and Meyer estimates that recent weeks have set a new record for debt issuance from riskier “high yield” firms with lower credit ratings.Lending markets had slammed shut for all but the most trusted firms in March, but have been opened up wide again by emergency corporate debt buying programmes from central banks like the United States Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank and Bank of Japan.Companies included in the new debt index already owe almost 40 percent more than they did in 2014, and growth in debt has comfortably outstripped growth in profits. Pre-tax profits for the same group of 900 companies have risen a collective 9.1 percent to $2.3 trillion. Gearing, a measure of debt relative to shareholder finance, hit a record 59 percent in 2019, while the proportion of profit devoted to servicing interest payments also rose to a new high.US companies owe almost half of the world’s corporate debt at $3.9 trillion and have seen the fastest increase in the last five years of any major economy with the exception of Switzerland where there has been a wave of major M&A deals.Germany comes in at number two at $762 billion. It also has three of the world’s most indebted firms including the most indebted, Volkswagen, which with $192 billion of debt is not far behind countries like South Africa or Hungary, though it is inflated by its car finance arm.In contrast, a quarter of the companies in the new index have no debt at all, and some have vast cash reserves. The biggest of these stands at $104 billion and belongs to Google’s owner Alphabet.Meyer said credit markets still had some way to go to get back to pre-COVID conditions and the ongoing threat of the virus, especially the recent surge in US cases, remained investors’ central concern.“It is all a recipe for a more challenged outlook than we thought two months ago,” he said.Topics :last_img read more

USC hosts conference on Buddhist ethics

first_imgUSC School of Religion assistant professor Rongdao Lai hosted the Conference on Buddhist Ethics  from June 8 to 10. The conference featured 34 scholars who discussed the application of Buddhist principles to important social issues. Thirty-four scholars at the Conference on Buddhist Ethics discussed race, class and resistance in relation to religion. USC professor Rongdai Lao organized the weekend-long event. Ling Luo | Daily TrojanThe event was sponsored by Tong Fa Temple and Malton Group, and was co-sponsored by the USC School of Religion, Shinso Ito Center for Japanese Religion and Culture, USC East Asian Religion Studies Center and the Center for International Studies at USC. “In conceiving this conference, we were thinking that we really wanted to invite people working in different disciplines, covering different geographic areas and working on different time periods,” Lai said. “We have scholars from as far as Japan, U.K. and quite a few from Canada. I’m excited to welcome everyone to USC.”According to Lai, the conference comes after the first Conference on Buddhist Ethics at Dickinson College in 2016. Attendees were invited by the event organizers and were chosen based on their area of study.“We really wanted to invite people who worked in different disciplines,” Lai said. “We have an even number of male and female scholars. We have a balanced number of people in different stages of their career, so we have senior scholars in the field, [and] we also have young scholars early in their career.”Lai focused this year’s conference on discussing race, class and resistance in the context of Buddhism, to help nurture a healthy community and to promote Buddhist ethics. “In the planning process, we decided that we would be focusing on the issues of class, race and resistance,” Lai said. “We wanted to make sure to look at this from the doctrinal, historical, anthropological kind of perspective, in different parts of the world as well.”Multiple sessions took place over the course of the weekend. For the first 15 minutes of each session, the topic of the seminar was introduced. This was followed by a 40-minute session where participants were assigned to small discussion groups. Toward the end, the small groups convened for a general 30-minute session to discuss their thoughts. “In terms of conference format, I think this is very innovative because we decided that no one is going to be presenting papers,” Lai said. “We organized the conference more in the format of a workshop, so we appointed discussion leaders to set context and select certain sources that could be helpful in developing discussion arguments. On June 8, the conference consisted of two sessions. The first session, which discussed Buddhism and class, was facilitated by University of Central Florida professor Ann Gleig and University of British Columbia professor Jessica Main. USC professor Duncan Williams and Youngstown State University professor Michael Jerryson facilitated the second session.During her session, Gleig proposed a three-part definition for a class and its relation to religious students. She provided metaphorical models which implemented a loose framework for examining Buddhist class structures. According to Gleig, there are multiple models that can be used by scholars to shape an argument about class and religious studies.“You got the pyramid in which you got the smaller leader and much larger lower class and limited opportunities for movement and a lot of regulation on all areas of life,” Gleig said. “The binary model is something we are more familiar with, you know Marxist models where there is tension between the Proletariat and the Bourgeoisie.”On June 9, Harvard University professor Chris Queen and Bucknell University professor James Shields facilitated a session on right speech and social change. Following the seminar, the scholars visited the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo.By the end of the  weekend-long event, the scholars gained knowledge of various aspects of Buddhism from other professors, as well as different perspectives that western and eastern countries had on the religion. “We tried to create this platform and community where people can be willing to trust scholars who make studying Buddhism their living to talk about important issues,” Lai said. “Engagement and being involved is a very important part of the conference for me, so the very success of the conference depends on participation from all and not the findings of one of two individuals.”last_img read more

Shaban Lubega: PML Daily Premier League team of the Week 7

first_imgJamie Vardy scored twice in the victory over Newcastle United this past Sunday. (PHOTO/Courtesy)Liverpool are having their best start to a Premier League season and are showing no signs of slowing down. This past Saturday, Jurgen Klopp’s side registered their 7th successive victory of the season as they dispatched a spirited Sheffield United side 1-0 thanks to Georginio Wijnaldum’s late goal. The victory sees them maintain 5 point lead at the top of the log.Second-placed Man City were also victorious on the same day. A goal each by Gabriel Jesus, Riyad Mahrez and Raheem Sterling saw the Citizens walk away 3-1 winners away to Everton and now have 16 points from seven games.The other two big six occupants who were in action, Spurs and Chelsea also won their respective fixtures. Spurs who played the majority of the game with 10 men after Serge Aurier was sent off in the first half, beat Southampton 2-1 at home. Tonguy Ndombele and Harry Kane scored for the home side either side of a Danny Ings equalizer.For Chelsea, they defeated Brighton 2-0 thanks to second-half goals by Jorginho and Willian. Chelsea like Spurs have 11 points each after 7 games and are 6th and 5th on the table respectively.Elsewhere, Leicester were the biggest winners of the weekend, humiliating Newcastle 5-0 at the King Power Stadium, Crystal Palace beat Norwich 2-0 while Wolves defeated Watford by the same scoreline.The fixture between Man United and Arsenal will be played on Monday night at Old Trafford.Here are the XI players who stood out according to Shaban Lubega.GK: Ederson (Man City)Two world-class saves to deny Yerry Mina was as good as the Brazilian shot-stopper got on Saturday as his Man City side defeated Everton 3-1.RB: Ricardo Pereira (Leicester)Pereira scored Leicester’s opening goal against Newcastle, while also making three tackles in the 5-0 victory.LB:  Aaron Croswell (West Ham)Scored the equalizer in the 2-2 draw away to AFC Bournemouth, his second goal in as many games.CB: Matt Doherty (Wolves)Netted the opener in the 2-0 victory over Watford on Sunday and also helped Wolves to a clean sheet.CB: Fikayo Tomori (Chelsea)Continued his fine start to his Chelsea career with another magnificent display in the 2-0 victory over Brighton on Saturday. Tomori made the most passes of any Chelsea player while completing 90 percent of them.MF: Georginio Wijnaldum (Liverpool)In addition to netting the winning goal, Wijnaldum had the highest pass completion rate of any Liverpool player (98%) at Bramall Lane.MF: Kevin De Bruyne (Man City)Without a doubt City’s star man. De Bruyne was at it again as he masterminded Man City’s 3-1 victory against Everton, assisting Gabriel Jesus’s opener.MF: John McGinn (Aston Villa).One of the revelations of the season, McGinn continued to impress as he scored one of Aston Villa’s two goals in the draw with Burnley.FW: Jamie Vardy (Leicester City).Vardy netted twice against Newcastle and has now scored 14 goals in the Premier League since Brendan Rodgers took charge.FW: Riyad Mahrez (Man City)Mahrez scored one and created a team-high five chances for Man City in the 3-1 victory away to Everton.FW: Harry Kane (Tottenham)Kane scored the winner in the 2-1 win over Southampton on Saturday. It was also his sixth consecutive Premier League goal against the Saints.Comments Tags: premier leagueTeam of the weeklast_img read more