Beyond chess Computer beats human in ancient Chinese game

by Malcolm Ritter, The Associated Press Posted Jan 27, 2016 2:33 pm MDT Last Updated Jan 27, 2016 at 3:00 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email FILE – A player places a black stone while his opponent waits to place a white one as they play Go, a game of strategy, in the Seattle Go Center, Tuesday, April 30, 2002. The game, which originated in China more than 2,500 years ago, involves two players who take turns putting markers on a grid. The object is to surround more area on the board with the markers than one’s opponent, as well as capturing the opponent’s pieces by surrounding them. A paper released Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 describes how a computer program has beaten a human master at the complex board game, marking significant advance for development of artificial intelligence. (AP Photo/Cheryl Hatch) Beyond chess: Computer beats human in ancient Chinese game NEW YORK, N.Y. – A computer program has beaten a human champion at the ancient Chinese board game Go, marking a significant advance for development of artificial intelligence.The program had taught itself how to win, and its developers say its learning strategy may someday let computers help solve real-world problems like making medical diagnoses and pursuing scientific research.The program and its victory are described in a paper released Wednesday by the journal Nature.Computers previously have surpassed humans for other games, including chess, checkers and backgammon. But among classic games, Go has long been viewed as the most challenging for artificial intelligence to master.Go, which originated in China more than 2,500 years ago, involves two players who take turns putting markers on a checkerboard-like grid. The object is to surround more area on the board with the markers than one’s opponent, as well as capturing the opponent’s pieces by surrounding them.While the rules are simple, playing it well is not. It’s “probably the most complex game ever devised by humans,” Dennis Hassabis of Google DeepMind in London, one of the study authors, told reporters Tuesday.The new program, AlphaGo, defeated the European champion in all five games of a match in October, the Nature paper reports.In March, AlphaGo will face legendary player Lee Sedol in Seoul, South Korea, for a $1 million prize, Hassabis said.Martin Mueller, a computing science professor at the University of Alberta in Canada who has worked on Go programs for 30 years but didn’t participate in AlphaGo, said the new program “is really a big step up from everything else we’ve seen…. It’s a very, very impressive piece of work.”___Online:Information about Go: http://www.britgo.org/whatisgoJournal Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature___Follow Malcolm Ritter at http://twitter.com/malcolmritter His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/malcolm-ritter read more

Iron ore export ban in Goa and Karnataka has led to drastic

first_imgIn a report in India’s Economic Times, a ban on mining and exporting of iron ore has led to job losses for a million people in the two mineral-rich states of Goa and Karnataka, the paper quoting a joint study by an industry chamber and a private bank that was published on January 1, 2015.“The export ban after the 2008 global meltdown resulted in drastic fall in mineral production, as export of iron ore from Goa and Karnataka plunged to 14 Mt last fiscal year (2013-14) from 117 Mt in 2009-10,” said the study conducted by the Associated Chambers of Commerce of India (Assocham) and Yes Bank. The study titled, “Mining: Building a sustainable development framework for inclusive growth”, noted the Indian mining sector was saddled with logistic inefficiencies, economic, bureaucratic, environmental and a host of capacity issues due to lack of coordination between various agencies.“Illegal mining, regulatory issues, policy gridlocks, inadequate supporting infrastructure and legal cases are stalling the sector’s growth and affecting a million people directly and indirectly,” said Assocham Secretary General DS Rawat in the study. Noting that lack of central planning was leading to procurement delays, he called for efficient rail and road transportation for quicker movement of iron ore for consumption by steel producers.Calling for radical policy initiatives such as single-window clearance for greenfield and brownfield projects to enable greater participation by private sector, Rawat said boosting production, improving financing across the value chain and promoting sustainable practices would ensure responsible mining in compliance with law. “Rapid urbanisation and growth in the manufacturing sector will fuel up to 9-11 per cent annual increase in demand for metals and minerals,” the study said.The Economic Times noted from the study that as the mining industry, comprising small and medium enterprises (SMEs) is involved in surveying, exploration and other mining activities, the stakeholders have to tap innovative funding sources, as the recent judicial and regulatory developments in the sector have dried up new funding from banks. “Limited geological and exploration expenditure, weak law enforcement, lack of coordinated approach in decision-making, human resource and technological gaps and insufficient investments are challenges daunting the sector,” Rawat noted.The study has suggested a time-bound plan to monitor mining activities, the introduction of a single-window system to to centralise functions of all ministries/agencies to expedite approval processes and offer information to boost investor confidence in the sector.Ban on mining and exporting of iron ore has led to jobs loss for a million people in the two mineral-rich states of Goa and Karnataka, a joint study by an industry chamber and a private bank said Thursday.”Export ban after the 2008 global meltdown resulted in drastic fall in mineral production, as export of iron ore from Goa and Karnataka plunged to 14 million tonnes last fiscal (2013-14) from 117 million tonnes in 2009-10,” said the study conducted by the Associated Chambers of Commer ..Read more at:http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/45718008.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppstlast_img read more