Alabama pipeline blast sparks worries about South gas prices

Alabama pipeline blast sparks worries about South gas prices A flame continues to burn after a Monday explosion of a Colonial Pipeline, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, in Helena, Ala. The blast, which sent flames and thick black smoke soaring over the forest, happened about a mile west of where the pipeline ruptured in September, Gov. Robert Bentley said in a statement. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson) HELENA, Ala. – A deadly explosion that sparked a geyser of fire has shut down a vital pipeline supplying gasoline to millions of people across the Southeast, raising fears of another round of gas shortages and price increases after the pipeline’s second accident and shutdown in two months.Continuing fires in the drought-stricken area of central Alabama hampered officials’ efforts to fully assess the damage Tuesday afternoon, and firefighters built an earthen berm to contain the burning fuel.The accident happened when a dirt-moving track hoe struck the pipeline, ignited gasoline and sparked a blast Monday, killing one worker and injuring five others, Georgia-based Colonial Pipeline said.Four of the injured remained hospitalized, Colonial spokesman Bill Berry said Tuesday afternoon in nearby Helena, Alabama. UAB Hospital, where the injured were treated, declined to release information on them, citing requests by their families for privacy.Another worker was treated for less-severe injuries and released from a hospital, Berry said.The company said it hoped to restart the pipeline as early as the weekend. As much as 168,000 gallons of gasoline could have burned, spilled, evaporated or remained in the pipeline, the company said.The explosion happened a few miles from where the Colonial pipeline sprung a leak and spilled 252,000 to 336,000 gallons of gasoline in September. After the leak, the company used one of Colonial’s two main lines to move gasoline as it made repairs, but it still led to days of dry pumps and higher gas prices in Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee and the Carolinas while repairs were made.Contractors were working on repairs related to the September leak when gasoline ignited and spread fire to the pipeline, the U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration said Tuesday.The nine-member crew was using the track hoe to excavate the pipeline so that permanent repairs from the September leak could be made, Colonial Pipeline executive Gerald Beck said.The pipeline provides nearly 40 per cent of the region’s gasoline and usually runs at or near full capacity. Together Colonial’s two lines carry more than 2 million barrels of fuel a day.By mid-day Tuesday, Colonial Pipeline said it was able to restart the second of its two main lines, which carries diesel fuel and jet fuel.The severity of the gasoline shortage will depend on how long the gasoline pipeline remains closed, AAA spokesman Mark Jenkins said.“We would encourage drivers not to panic, so don’t run to the gas station and start filling up every gas can you can,” said AAA spokeswoman Tamra Johnson.After the September leak, Colonial said it made up some of the gasoline shortfall by sending gas through the line that usually carries diesel and jet fuel. The company has not said whether it will do so again.Colonial Pipeline, based in Alpharetta, Georgia, operates 5,599 miles of pipelines, transporting gasoline, jet fuel, home heating oil and other hazardous liquids daily in 13 states and the District of Columbia, according to company filings.Plagued by a severe drought after weeks without rain, the section of Alabama where the explosion happened has been scarred by multiple wildfires in recent weeks.Pete Valenti, deputy fire chief in Helena, said the pipeline was spewing a geyser of flame several hundred feet into the air when crews arrived.“There was a hole in the pipeline. Product was just shooting out,” he said.From 3,000 feet in the air, a flame could be seen still burning in a haze of smoke Tuesday when an AP photographer flew over the site.Photographer Brynn Anderson said the blackened earth and a large area of charred trees are surrounded by other trees awash in fall colours just beyond the burned area.Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley and Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal temporarily eased limits on the hours that truckers carrying gasoline may drive. Other governors took similar action following the September leak, which allowed truckers to transport more gasoline by highways, making up for some of the shortage.In North Carolina, Attorney General Roy Cooper reminded residents that North Carolina’s price gouging law remains in effect. Gov. Pat McCrory urged citizens not to participate in panic buying. McCrory, a Republican, and Cooper, a Democrat, are rivals in the 2016 governor’s race.In 2003, the EPA fined Colonial $34 million for gross negligence after it spilled almost a million gallons of diesel in South Carolina, polluting waterways in four states. The company also agreed to spend $30 million to upgrade environmental protections on its pipeline system.Since 2006, the company has reported 178 spills and other incidents that released a combined 193,000 gallons of hazardous liquids and caused $39 million in property damage. Most were caused by problems with materials, welding or some other equipment failure, according to federal accident records reviewed by The Associated Press.The company paid $381,000 in penalties for violating safety rules during the same period.___Associated Press Writer David Koenig in Dallas contributed. Jay Reeves reported from Helena, Alabama; Jeff Martin reported from Atlanta. by Jay Reeves And Jeff Martin, The Associated Press Posted Oct 31, 2016 10:04 pm MDT Last Updated Nov 1, 2016 at 5:05 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

UN rights expert deeply concerned about reprisals against those she met on

“There is one word that has hung heavily on my mind during this visit – reprisals,” the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, Yanghee Lee, said in a press statement wrapping up her 9 to 21 January mission to the country. She said she is deeply concerned about those with whom she met and spoke, “those critical of the Government, those defending and advocating for the rights of others, and those who expressed their thoughts and opinions which did not conform to the narrative of those in the position of power.” Moreover, she noted the increasing use of section 66 (d) of the Telecommunications Law against many, “merely for speaking their minds.” “It is particularly alarming to learn that the security forces’ counter operations in the villages of Maungdaw north in Rakhine state have reportedly been resumed following a brief lull, with raids conducted in several villages including nearby the villages I visited,” Ms. Lee stressed.There are further allegations of arbitrary arrests and detention in relation to these latest reported raids.The expert was especially dismayed to note that during the visit, feelings of optimism and hope had appeared to be fading among the country’s ordinary people – just one year after nationwide elation over the last general elections.The Special Rapporteur regretted that due to security reasons, she was only allowed to go to Myitkyina, and not Laiza and Hpakant in Kachin, stating that the situation “at the northern borders is deteriorating.” “Those in Kachin state tell me that the situation is now worse than at any point in the past few years. Whilst I was not able to travel to the areas most severely affected, the situation is now such that even in Myitkyina, the capital of the state and home to over 300,000 people, residents are afraid – and now stay home after dark,” the UN expert explained.In visiting a hard labour camp in Mon state, Ms. Lee was concerned over prisoners’ living conditions, pointing to the use of shackles as a form of additional punishment and the lack of transparency regarding their transfer to the hard labour camp. Without an individual complaint system in prisons she was “struck by the fear of those prisoners who were afraid of what would happen to them after speaking to me.” A report from the visit will be presented in March to the UN Human Rights Council.Special Rapporteurs and independent experts are appointed by the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council to examine and report back on a specific human rights theme or a country situation. The positions are honorary and the experts are not UN staff, nor are they paid for their work. read more