Big cow tests animal store Petcos all leashed pets are welcome policy

first_imgPetco has since responded regarding the steer’s visit. “We mean it when we say ALL leashed pets are welcome in our stores,” the company said on Facebook Tuesday. Good to know Petco doesn’t have a beef with leashed farm animals stopping by. Badass animal GoPro photos More animal news 31 Photos Sci-Tech Tags African Watusi steers don’t look like the typical cow. They weigh an impressive 1,000 to 1,600 pounds (454 to 726 kilograms).Their unusually large horns have the largest circumference found in any cattle breed. The largest horns have been measured as 37.5 inches (95.25 centimeters) by the Guinness World Records in 2003.”We decided to take a chance and call Petco’s bluff on the ‘All leashed pets are welcome’ policy; the awesome crew at Petco – Atascocita did not disappoint!” Browning posted on his Facebook page. “They welcomed Oliver the African Watusi with open arms,” Browning continued. “The staff members here are always super friendly and courteous to us.”center_img This docile African Watusi steer named Oliver receives a very warm welcome at a Texas Petco store. Shelly Lumpkin/Facebook Adoring pet owners who love taking their cats and dogs wherever they go know they can bring their furry friends inside retail pet food store Petco. But two Texas ranchers decided to test Petco’s policy that “all leashed pets are welcome in the store” by bringing in their beloved bovine. Ranchers Vincent Browning and Shelly Lumpkin put a leash on their African Watusi steer and took him into their local Petco in Atascocita this week, according to news reports. Browning’s steer, named Oliver, is famous in his own right, having a Facebook page of his own with 34,817 followers.  2 Comments Curious koala in Australia sneaks inside a parked car to cool off Watch a kangaroo attack a landing paraglider in Australia Romeo, the ‘world’s loneliest frog,’ finally gets a crack at love Share your voicelast_img read more

Procession rally banned in Khagrachhari municipality

first_img-The district administration on Sunday slapped section 144 in Khagrachhari municipality area from morning to evening to ward off any untoward incident centring a protest programme seeking cancellation of the primary school teachers’ recruitment process.Sushama Unnyan O Durniti Protirodh Committee of the district arranged a rally at Khagrachhari Sadar upazila headquarter in the morning brining allegations of massive corruption in teachers’ recruitment process of primary schools by the district administration.During the rally, the speakers demanded the cancellation of the recruitment process. Otherwise, the district administration office will be besieged, they threatened.Following this, the district administration imposed section 144 starting from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm to maintain law and order situation.However, the committee decided to enforce a hartal on Monday.Section 144 of the Criminal Procedure Code (CrPC) of 1973 empowers an executive magistrate to prohibit an assembly of more than four people in an area.last_img read more

The Story Of Houston Is The Story Of Its Highways

first_img Share Joe Wolf/FlickrThe story of Houston is more than the history of a shipping channel, oil and gas or the space program. It’s also the story of the highways that link these industries with the people and resources that created growth. Houston highways also changed the layout of communities – relocating some neighborhoods and hemming in others.A new book, ‘Power Moves,’ tells the story of the relocated neighborhoods together with the people and communities whose homes and businesses were built over. Author Kyle Shelton is also the director for strategic partnerships, and a fellow at Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research.Shelton says Houston had one highway in 1950. “[Houston] was in the vanguard of cities that were inventing and building themselves at the time – that car-based growth [was] happening.” Shelton says. “Houston, along with Phoenix and Los Angeles and several other sunbelt cities, really grew around the transportation infrastructure they built in the early post World War II era.”Though Shelton says the results of highway-centric development can be debated, it’s not fair to do so in hindsight.“There are some really legitimate reasons to question how we made our decisions that are just about highways,” says Shelton. “[It isn’t fair to say that] in 1955 [planners] should have known that over-focusing on highways would lead to all these consequences.” Shelton says, “It is fair to say …that Houston and all these other cities focused on highways to the detriment of public transportation, bicycle infrastructure and pedestrian infrastructure.”“Power Moves” describes not just how debates over highway construction grow out of urban and metropolitan politics. Shelton also describes highway building’s impact on individuals and neighborhoods.“In the 1950s and 1960s…from the wealthier suburbs to lower-income communities, no one really had a lot of communication with public officials who were designing this,” says Shelton.In the 1970s, federal law called for more public comment and slowed down the process of planning and building highway systems. “At this point there certainly never has been a perfect public engagement process,” he says.“Moving up to today…the major projects we’re confronting now, in cities across the country, are projects that are being discussed and debated for decades,” Shelton says.Public officials really need to explain why projects are needed, what the benefits are, and the public needs to communicate back.“It’s too easy,” says Shelton “to dismiss people’s meaningful thoughts, if they don’t have the kind of technical basis to understand the project.”Shelton says cities like Houston, that have emphasized highways, face challenges.“It can’t be just highways or just public transportation,” he says. “Those two cannot be at loggerheads any more, If we want to be able to see a [transportation] system that works for everybody and gives people lots of options, [then] giving lots of different folks from lots of different neighborhoods the time and space to participate in that [planning and developing the system] is key.”Written by Christopher De Los Santos.last_img read more