Big time Customs Officer fined and fired for theft

first_img Police looking for band of eight robbers; Outten gets bail despite serious gun charges Recommended for you Turks & Caicos and United States team up for ‘Don’t Pack a Pest’ program Related Items:Clyde Scottie Glinton, customs department, supreme court, theft Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 23 Feb 2016 – Police today reveal that Clyde Scottie Glinton did not fight the charge of stealing from the Customs Department between November 2011 and January 2012.Glinton entered a guilty plea at Supreme Court in Provo.Over the three months, Scottie Glinton, once a senior Customs Officer at the Provo International Airport, took money which should have gone from the PIA to Customs Central Unit and pocketed it.Glinton was the officer in charge and the amount was $19,273.42.Glinton was on Monday (Feb 22)fined $25,000 and sentenced to three years in jail; the jail time is conditional so he will not serve the time but could if he finds himself in trouble with the law again.Clyde ‘Scottie’ Glinton has 90 days to pay the fine, else be imprisoned for 12 months.Generally, this is a fortunate break for the public officer who was arrested in connection to the theft in September 2013. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp 7 BAIC workers arrested for Theftlast_img read more

FEBRUARY VACATION FUN Petting Zoo Kids Fun Fair At Shriners Auditorium

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Commerford Fun Fair returns to the Shriners Auditorium (99 Fordham Road) during February vacation.The Fair will be open on Saturday, February 16, 2019 (10am-7pm); Sunday, February 17, 2019 (10am-6pm); and Monday, February 18, 2019 (10am-6pm).These fairs, held year-round up and down the east coast, are a “fun, friendly, and safe place to bring your family.” The fair feature rides, games, and a unique chance to interact with animals.Children 12 and under are free with coupon. Price for adults online are $10. Price for adults at the event are $18. Free children coupons are available at local businesses or at front box office during the event.Rides and other vendors inside are an additional cost. For ride prices, visit www.commerfordzoo.com. Call 860-491-3421 with any questions.(NOTE: The above information was submitted by Commerford Fun Fair.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedFEBRUARY VACATION FUN: Petting Zoo At Shriners AuditoriumIn “Community”FEBRUARY VACATION FUN: Petting Zoo At Shriners AuditoriumIn “Community”5 Things You Need To Know In Wilmington Today (February 20, 2017)In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

The Story Of Houston Is The Story Of Its Highways

first_img Share Joe Wolf/FlickrThe story of Houston is more than the history of a shipping channel, oil and gas or the space program. It’s also the story of the highways that link these industries with the people and resources that created growth. Houston highways also changed the layout of communities – relocating some neighborhoods and hemming in others.A new book, ‘Power Moves,’ tells the story of the relocated neighborhoods together with the people and communities whose homes and businesses were built over. Author Kyle Shelton is also the director for strategic partnerships, and a fellow at Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research.Shelton says Houston had one highway in 1950. “[Houston] was in the vanguard of cities that were inventing and building themselves at the time – that car-based growth [was] happening.” Shelton says. “Houston, along with Phoenix and Los Angeles and several other sunbelt cities, really grew around the transportation infrastructure they built in the early post World War II era.”Though Shelton says the results of highway-centric development can be debated, it’s not fair to do so in hindsight.“There are some really legitimate reasons to question how we made our decisions that are just about highways,” says Shelton. “[It isn’t fair to say that] in 1955 [planners] should have known that over-focusing on highways would lead to all these consequences.” Shelton says, “It is fair to say …that Houston and all these other cities focused on highways to the detriment of public transportation, bicycle infrastructure and pedestrian infrastructure.”“Power Moves” describes not just how debates over highway construction grow out of urban and metropolitan politics. Shelton also describes highway building’s impact on individuals and neighborhoods.“In the 1950s and 1960s…from the wealthier suburbs to lower-income communities, no one really had a lot of communication with public officials who were designing this,” says Shelton.In the 1970s, federal law called for more public comment and slowed down the process of planning and building highway systems. “At this point there certainly never has been a perfect public engagement process,” he says.“Moving up to today…the major projects we’re confronting now, in cities across the country, are projects that are being discussed and debated for decades,” Shelton says.Public officials really need to explain why projects are needed, what the benefits are, and the public needs to communicate back.“It’s too easy,” says Shelton “to dismiss people’s meaningful thoughts, if they don’t have the kind of technical basis to understand the project.”Shelton says cities like Houston, that have emphasized highways, face challenges.“It can’t be just highways or just public transportation,” he says. “Those two cannot be at loggerheads any more, If we want to be able to see a [transportation] system that works for everybody and gives people lots of options, [then] giving lots of different folks from lots of different neighborhoods the time and space to participate in that [planning and developing the system] is key.”Written by Christopher De Los Santos.last_img read more