Maritime cluster for Mandela Bay

first_imgA dedicated maritime cluster in theEastern Cape will boost regional economy.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free images, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Peter Myles  Coordinator: NMB maritime cluster  interim task team  +27 82 556 1680 • Tantaswa Cici  Manager: maritime safety, Eastern  Cape Department of Transport  +27 43 604 7629 or +27 71 673 5171 RELATED ARTICLES • Motor cluster will drive change • Safer seas for PE’s marine life • SA maritime industry set to grow • Aviation, maritime careers for youth • SA harbour chief makes world historyEmily van RijswijckPlans are afoot to create a dedicated maritime cluster for the port region of Nelson Mandela Bay (NMB) in the Eastern Cape in order to build on and enhance the city’s existing marine activities.The cluster idea is a joint initiative of the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality and the Nelson Mandela Bay Business Chamber. The first meeting of the partners took place in February in Port Elizabeth and was attended by 80 invited participants, all with a direct interest in the sector.“Port Elizabeth is historically a maritime city and yet for some reason it has never developed a maritime industry,” says Peter Myles, coordinator of the interim task team elected at the inaugural meeting to look into the viability of the venture.Myles is also chairman of the NMB Tourism Industry Association and a lecturer at NMMU in marine tourism and coastal recreation.The interim task team will appoint a steering committee, which will develop the policy, goals, strategy, actions and resources for a cluster framework aligned to the province’s integrated provincial maritime plan, currently under review.The steering committee will start by investigating the feasibility of ship building and other related industries, including the establishment of a maritime university.Port Elizabeth’s harbour, the fifth largest in South Africa, plays an important role in the movement of clean cargo, automotive parts and vehicles. The magnificent Port of Ngqura, now South Africa’s premier trans-shipment hub, lies a mere 20 km to the north.The Bay, as the city is fondly referred to, also has much to offer in terms of marine tourism. It’s home to one of the largest colonies of the endangered African penguin, and the marine section of the Greater Addo Elephant Park shares the bay area with the city.According to Myles, the main conclusion drawn at the first meeting was that the maritime sector could be a leading contributor to a sustainable provincial economy.Benefiting the greater communityThe maritime industry encompasses a vast array of activities and disciplines, among them designing, building and operating vessels; stevedoring and customs brokerage services; fisheries; the marine railways sector and the myriad industries involved in the maintenance and repair of vessels.Coastal and marine tourism and similar enterprises are also included in this sector.Some of these industries, such as stevedoring, are already in place in Port Elizabeth, while others, such as boatbuilding and repairs, are sorely lacking.In addition, Port Elizabeth remains a favourite tourist destination for South Africans, and international tourism numbers continue to grow.Estimates put the number of foreign visitors to Port Elizabeth in 2010 at 250 000 and domestics tourists in the same year at about 1-million, while the combined spend amounted to about R3-billion (US$386-million).Of special interest to potential cluster partners is the role such a combined effort can play in helping small to medium enterprises.“International experience indicates that the level of business formation tends to be higher in clusters,” says Myles. “Start-ups are more reliant on external suppliers and partners, all of which they find in a cluster, so clusters reduce the costs of failure, as entrepreneurs can fall back on local employment opportunities in the many other companies in the same field.”Clusters also encourage knowledge-sharing and innovation and in these areas NMMU has the potential to play a critical role, he adds.“Nelson Mandela Bay is a region where small-scale businesses and disadvantaged coastal communities could largely benefit, improving their job opportunities and their lives through application of a proposed micro-enterprise promotion strategy.”It is hoped that the cluster will stimulate the growth of smaller companies offering services such as boat building and repairs. It could also enhance the existing coastal and marine tourism sector and even, perhaps, encourage the creation of a maritime university.“In a nutshell, the expectation is that a maritime cluster will uncover Port Elizabeth’s competitive advantage and, with collaboration, will assist in the growth of this sector,” says Myles.Other clusters to boost local economyThe announcement of the maritime cluster follows closely on the heels of the recently launched Eastern Cape automotive cluster, which was formally inaugurated by trade and industry minister Rob Davis in March.Globally, clusters have become the norm in the creation of cross-industry linkages and complementary relationships. In Europe, maritime clusters are well established and offer their members a competitive advantage, says Myles.“In less than half a decade cluster development has become a common factor for economic development agencies in over 40 countries around the world. Clusters are the building blocks of a productive, innovative economy.”Port Elizabeth then and nowThe port area of Port Elizabeth is more than 180 years old. Following the arrival of British settlers in 1820 the harbour area became extremely busy, with mohair, wool and ostrich feathers the most common cargo shipped from the port.By 1825 Port Elizabeth was given port status with the appointment of a harbour master and, a year later, of a collector of customs.According to the Department of Transport 80% of the country’s trade is carried out by sea and it has therefore become necessary to prioritise the shipping industry.South Africa is one of the top 15 shipping countries in the world in terms of the tonnage transported to and from its ports.last_img read more

Young entrepreneurs need big business support

first_imgPolitical economist Siya Biniza emphasises the need for big business to act as mentors for young entrepreneurs.Political economist Siya Biniza believes South Africa’s youth possess great ideas that, with enough entrepreneurial verve, can be turned into thriving businesses. However, the only thing preventing them from chasing their dreams is the lack of support from big business.Speaking at a South African Competitiveness Forum research reference group held at Brand South Africa offices on Saturday, 18 August, Biniza said there is little support for young entrepreneurs in terms of finance and knowledge.Biniza, chief financial officer at Rethink Africa, a youth-led non-profit company that looks for alternative solutions to the continent’s economic challenges, said young entrepreneurs without prior business experience are not easily supported because funders are afraid of taking risks on them.Another factor impeding the growth of young businesspeople is intellectual property. Biniza said old entrants’ ideas are readily patented whereas new and young entrants are hardly considered because of the amount of money backers are risking. This occurs even though most business people know that one of the drivers of economic growth is innovation, he added. Fedusa secretary-general Dennis George says that if youth become active citizens, South Africa’s global competitiveness can be boosted. Despite Trevor Manuel’s efforts in getting youth involved with the National Development Plan (NDP), Biniza believes young men and women have not engaged with it as much as they could. “The youth need to take control of the NDP and make it ours by making leaders accountable.”Guest speaker Dennis George, secretary general of the neutral Federation of Unions of South Africa (Fedusa), said if youth become active citizens, South Africa’s global competiveness would be boosted.According to the 2014 World Competitiveness Yearbook published by Switzerland’s Institute of Management Development, South Africa’s competitiveness rose slightly in the last year, an indication that its productivity has increased. Its ranking improved from 53rd in 2013 to 52nd this year based on its economic growth.Despite increasing productivity, George said the number of jobs that have been lost in recent years has not been made up.Experience vs youthful enterpriseBiniza said successful entrepreneurs gain experience through making mistakes and learning from them. However, he said experience can hold young entrepreneurs back. “In as much as experience is important, it also inhibits creativity because the more you repeat a task, the more you get used to certain ways of doing things.”The advantage young people have, he added, is they are not “set in a way of conducting business” and have room to be creative; “We do whatever creative thing comes first.”But, he argued, entrepreneurs cannot be innovating all the time; there has to be a point where an idea becomes sustainable. This is when young entrepreneurs need experienced business people and even large corporations to be supportive.“If we are going to start talking about South Africa in 2030, it’s got to be about young people. It does not mean we are cutting big business out. Big business is very important in creating the development capacity of young entrepreneurs through their mentorship and making sure they procure from young businesses.”Biniza said big businesses may generate the most income, but they only employ 10% of the country’s population. Small- to medium-sized businesses, he said, are the backbone of the country’s economy, employing up to 90% of South Africans. In such a situation, small businesses need to access corporate funds for a cooperative form of monetary redistribution to occur.“We can measure the impact of the money you are sending off to smaller businesses,” said Biniza. “And this money can earn you returns if you create infrastructure such as social impact bonds, seed funding and venture capital frameworks. It’s about tapping into that money and having a collaborative approach to redistribution.”last_img read more

Netvibes Goes From Web 2.0 To Enterprise 2.0 In Partnership With Sage Software

first_imgMassive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts Tags:#enterprise#news Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… alex williamscenter_img 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affair In the Web 2.0 heyday, Netvibes had that star appeal that few companies ever experience. Their platform for creating personal dashboards rocketed in growth. Web innovators sang its praises. But you know the story. Netvibes struggled to find a business model.Now, we’re on the cusp of the Enterprise 2.0 movement and Netvibes has suddenly come back as a contender for providing dashboard environments to better manage enterprise software.Today, Netvibes is announcing a “sales, marketing and technology,” partnership with Sage Software, an enterprise software company with 5.8 million customers worldwide and more than 14,500 people worldwide.Sage will integrate the Netvibes dashboard technology into Sage software products and business processes. The idea is that enterprise software has become increasingly complex for users. Netvibes technology will help manage Sage software by providing customers with an environment that is more user friendly. Sage is hoping the partnership will bridge enterprise software with the Web 2.0 features of the Netvibes technology.Sage reaches mid-market companies. These are larger enterprises that may do $60 million in revenues. They are adopting increasingly complex software. For instance, spftware for Enterprise Resource Planning software (ERP) and Business Process Management (BPM) are more popular in light of enterprise efforts to bring more efficiencies in these times of economic difficulty. But often, the tools require a degree of administration beyond the capabilities of the average business user.Sage will integrate Netvibes into the launch of its ERP X3 software, coming in the first quarter of 2010.For all the skeptics of social technologies, is this at all proof of the benefits that social software provides? Sage is adopting the Netvibes platform to make it simpler for customers to use its ERP software.Netvibes grew from the roots of the social software movement. Its technology represents what social software can help people accomplish: give the user more options to be productive and creative in their work.last_img read more

Sexism,laddism and culture of harassment in UK varsities:study

first_imgFrom H S Rao London, Sep 14 (PTI) About 50 per cent of students in UK universities haveclaimed that there are “sexist laddism” and a “culture of harassment” in their universities, a new study reported today. In light of the findings by British National Union of Students, the organisation has called on BritainsWomen and Equalities Minister Jo Swinson to convene a summit on lad culture. Lad culture is defined as a group of people indulging in activies often associated with heavy alcohol consumption, and banter which was often sexist, misogynist and homophobic. The newly published report, “Thats what she said: Women students experiences of lad culture in higher education” brings together independently commissioned research from the University of Sussex examining lad culture on campus. The new research published reported that that 50 per cent of study participants identified “prevailing sexism, laddism and a culture of harassment” at their universities. Respondents described university education as gendered and cited issues such as the characterisation or status of particular subjects, classroom interactions and negative attitudes towards feminism and gender-related topics. Lad culture was thought to be particularly influential in the social side of university life. Extracurricular activities and sports in particular were singled out as key sites, and it was reported that sexism in such environments could spill over into sexual harassment and humiliation. For many participants, lad culture had been significant in relation to their personal life. Many reported misogynist jokes and banter circulating in their friendship groups which made them feel uncomfortable, and pressures to engage in profuse sexual relationships which made it difficult to establish and maintain commitments. Stories of sexual harassment and molestation were common, and there were also accounts of sexual violence. This included verbal harassment and catcalling, as well as physical harassment and sexual molestation. As such, the research contains analysis of data from interviews and focus groups with 40 women students from England and Scotland, exploring how lad culture affects every area of student life to a greater or lesser degree. British Labour Party politician Diane Abbott said: “It is important that the government and universities listen to what students are saying, and challenge any normalisation of sexism on university campuses. This isnt about being killjoys, but about building a society where people can learn and thrive free from shame, harassment and abuse. Polly Williams, Senior Policy Adviser, Equality Challenge Unit said: “A dominant lad culture may also damage the student experience of many male students, who either feel that they have to conform, or become disengaged from campus life to avoid it.” PTI HSR UZMadvertisementlast_img read more

Are Pro Wrestlers Dying at an Unusual Rate

I was barely 13 years old during WrestleMania VI on April 1, 1990, and just about at the height of my pro-wrestling fandom. I watched every televised event and read wrestling magazines, and I had been to a live event at the Blaisdell Arena in Honolulu. I even watched unofficial wrestling-analysis shows that aired in the middle of the night. I was delirious.My favorite wrestler was Brutus “The Barber” Beefcake, who took on “Mr. Perfect,” who had yet to lose in a televised head-to-head matchup. Brutus won. “Mr. Perfect,” a.k.a. Curt Hennig, had finally lost.Hennig died in 2003 at age 44.Of course, the main event at WrestleMania VI was the “Ultimate Challenge,” in which The Ultimate Warrior defeated Hulk Hogan to unify the Intercontinental Championship and the WWF Championship for the first — and so far only — time ever (the WWF changed its name to the WWE in 2002).The Ultimate Warrior, James Hellwig, died two weeks ago at age 54.Here are a few other pieces of information about WrestleMania VI:One match — Earthquake’s defeat of Hercules — featured two wrestlers who are now both dead.It was Andre the Giant’s last major televised match; he died in 1993 at age 46.Dusty Rhodes, who won his first wrestling title in 1968, is 68. His tag-team partner, Sapphire, his opponents “Macho Man” Randy Savage and the Sensational Queen Sherri, and his surprise manager, Miss Elizabeth (who was in a “feud” with Macho Man, her real-life husband), died in 1996, 2011, 2007 and 2003, respectively.Just five of 14 matches featured wrestlers who are all alive today.Here’s the card with all of the televised matches for the night. I’ve marked the ones who are dead in red; it’s one-third of the wrestlers who appeared (12 of 36, plus Miss Elizabeth).For all the dramatized bloodshed of professional wrestling, the card for WrestleMania VI certainly looks like a bloodbath. Is there anything fishy about pro wrestling, or are my intuitions about what percentage of young 1990s athletes should be alive 25 years later just way off?Let’s look at some data.I collected biographical information (including date of birth and date of death, if applicable) from the Internet Wrestling Database on all WWF wrestlers who are/would be younger than 60 in 2014, and who had at least 20 pay-per-view appearances between WrestleMania I in 1985 and the time the WWF was forced to change its name by the World Wildlife Fund in 2002 — for 203 in all.I then calculated each wrestler’s chances of dying between the ages of 25 (roughly around when his or her career may have started) and however old he or she is/would be in 2014, using actuarial tables from the Social Security Administration. Because health technology has improved significantly, I used a 1990 actuarial table to cover years before 2000, a 2000 table to cover years 2000 to 2009, and a 2010 table to cover 2010 to the present.I then broke them down by age groups and compared each group’s death rate with its expected death rate:We can also calculate the probability of so many wrestlers dying in each age group and overall by chance (using binom.dist), and it comes out like so:Note: I calculated each wrestler’s odds individually, but the probabilities in the last column of this table are based on the average probability for each group (which gets us extremely close, though technically it could be calculated precisely).I don’t want to speculate as to the cause of this phenomenon, though a number of theories in varying shades of sinister spring to mind. But it saddens me to think that my 13-year old self was so thoroughly entertained by watching ghosts. Rest in peace. read more

Big time Customs Officer fined and fired for theft

first_img Police looking for band of eight robbers; Outten gets bail despite serious gun charges Recommended for you Turks & Caicos and United States team up for ‘Don’t Pack a Pest’ program Related Items:Clyde Scottie Glinton, customs department, supreme court, theft Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 23 Feb 2016 – Police today reveal that Clyde Scottie Glinton did not fight the charge of stealing from the Customs Department between November 2011 and January 2012.Glinton entered a guilty plea at Supreme Court in Provo.Over the three months, Scottie Glinton, once a senior Customs Officer at the Provo International Airport, took money which should have gone from the PIA to Customs Central Unit and pocketed it.Glinton was the officer in charge and the amount was $19,273.42.Glinton was on Monday (Feb 22)fined $25,000 and sentenced to three years in jail; the jail time is conditional so he will not serve the time but could if he finds himself in trouble with the law again.Clyde ‘Scottie’ Glinton has 90 days to pay the fine, else be imprisoned for 12 months.Generally, this is a fortunate break for the public officer who was arrested in connection to the theft in September 2013. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp 7 BAIC workers arrested for Theftlast_img read more

FEBRUARY VACATION FUN Petting Zoo Kids Fun Fair At Shriners Auditorium

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Commerford Fun Fair returns to the Shriners Auditorium (99 Fordham Road) during February vacation.The Fair will be open on Saturday, February 16, 2019 (10am-7pm); Sunday, February 17, 2019 (10am-6pm); and Monday, February 18, 2019 (10am-6pm).These fairs, held year-round up and down the east coast, are a “fun, friendly, and safe place to bring your family.” The fair feature rides, games, and a unique chance to interact with animals.Children 12 and under are free with coupon. Price for adults online are $10. Price for adults at the event are $18. Free children coupons are available at local businesses or at front box office during the event.Rides and other vendors inside are an additional cost. For ride prices, visit www.commerfordzoo.com. Call 860-491-3421 with any questions.(NOTE: The above information was submitted by Commerford Fun Fair.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedFEBRUARY VACATION FUN: Petting Zoo At Shriners AuditoriumIn “Community”FEBRUARY VACATION FUN: Petting Zoo At Shriners AuditoriumIn “Community”5 Things You Need To Know In Wilmington Today (February 20, 2017)In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

The Story Of Houston Is The Story Of Its Highways

first_img Share Joe Wolf/FlickrThe story of Houston is more than the history of a shipping channel, oil and gas or the space program. It’s also the story of the highways that link these industries with the people and resources that created growth. Houston highways also changed the layout of communities – relocating some neighborhoods and hemming in others.A new book, ‘Power Moves,’ tells the story of the relocated neighborhoods together with the people and communities whose homes and businesses were built over. Author Kyle Shelton is also the director for strategic partnerships, and a fellow at Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research.Shelton says Houston had one highway in 1950. “[Houston] was in the vanguard of cities that were inventing and building themselves at the time – that car-based growth [was] happening.” Shelton says. “Houston, along with Phoenix and Los Angeles and several other sunbelt cities, really grew around the transportation infrastructure they built in the early post World War II era.”Though Shelton says the results of highway-centric development can be debated, it’s not fair to do so in hindsight.“There are some really legitimate reasons to question how we made our decisions that are just about highways,” says Shelton. “[It isn’t fair to say that] in 1955 [planners] should have known that over-focusing on highways would lead to all these consequences.” Shelton says, “It is fair to say …that Houston and all these other cities focused on highways to the detriment of public transportation, bicycle infrastructure and pedestrian infrastructure.”“Power Moves” describes not just how debates over highway construction grow out of urban and metropolitan politics. Shelton also describes highway building’s impact on individuals and neighborhoods.“In the 1950s and 1960s…from the wealthier suburbs to lower-income communities, no one really had a lot of communication with public officials who were designing this,” says Shelton.In the 1970s, federal law called for more public comment and slowed down the process of planning and building highway systems. “At this point there certainly never has been a perfect public engagement process,” he says.“Moving up to today…the major projects we’re confronting now, in cities across the country, are projects that are being discussed and debated for decades,” Shelton says.Public officials really need to explain why projects are needed, what the benefits are, and the public needs to communicate back.“It’s too easy,” says Shelton “to dismiss people’s meaningful thoughts, if they don’t have the kind of technical basis to understand the project.”Shelton says cities like Houston, that have emphasized highways, face challenges.“It can’t be just highways or just public transportation,” he says. “Those two cannot be at loggerheads any more, If we want to be able to see a [transportation] system that works for everybody and gives people lots of options, [then] giving lots of different folks from lots of different neighborhoods the time and space to participate in that [planning and developing the system] is key.”Written by Christopher De Los Santos.last_img read more