14 kids die of Encephalitis in Bihars Muzaffarpur

first_imgIndian medical staff attend to a child admitted in the Encephalitis ward at The Baba Raghav Das Hospital in Gorakhpur, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, on August 12, 2017.SANJAY KANOJIA/AFP/Getty Images [Representational Image]Nearly 14 children are reported to have died in Muzaffarpur district of Bihar due to suspected Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) and Japanese Encephalitis (JE).According to the reports, five children have died in the past 24 hours due to the infection and over a dozen, kids are being treated at Shri Krishna Memorial College Hospital (SKMCH) and Kejriwal Hospital after showing various symptoms of Encephalitis, including high fever and unconsciousness.At least 21 children were admitted at Shri Krishna Memorial College Hospital and 14 were admitted at Kejriwal Hospital on Friday. The Superintendent of SKMCH Sunil Shahi said that the hospital has received a total of 38 patients so far and most of them have glucose deficiency in their blood.District Civil Surgeon SP Singh said that two of the children who died last week has been confirmed of Acute Encephalitis Syndrome. The death of the rest is unknown as of now but the authorities are investigating the incident.Singh said that most of the patients suspected of the infection were brought to the hospital with high fever and Hypoglycemia (a condition caused by a very low level of blood sugar (glucose), the body’s main energy source).”All primary health centres in the district have been put on high alert. But the people need to be cautious about their children as well. Give them as much liquid as you can and keep them hydrated,” he added, reports PTI.Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) is a serious health problem in India. It can be identified by the starting of high fever and clinical neurological manifestation that includes mental confusion, disorientation, delirium or coma. The infection commonly affects children and young adults and can lead to considerable morbidity and mortality.According to the National Health Portal of India, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) is the major cause of AES in India (ranging from 5%-35%). Herpes simplex virus, Influenza A virus, West Nile virus, Chandipura virus, mumps, measles, dengue, Parvovirus B4, enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus and scrub typhus, S.pneumoniae are the other causes of AES in sporadic and outbreak form in India. Nipah virus, Zika virus are also found as causative agents for AES. The etiology in a large number of AES cases still remains unidentified.last_img read more

PM to lead 22member team in Oikya Front dialogue

first_imgPrime Minister Sheikh Hasina. File PhotoAwami League president, prime minister  Sheikh Hasina will lead a 22-member delegation of the 14-party alliance to the dialogue with the leaders of the Jatiya Oikya Front on Thursday.The talks will be held at the prime minister’s official Ganabhaban residence at 7pm on Thursday.The delegation would include AL general secretary Obaidul Quader, advisory council members Amir Hossain Amu and Tofail Ahmed, presidium members Matia Chowdhury, Sheikh Fazlul Karim Selim, Mohammad Nasim, Md Abdur Razaque, Kazi Zafarullah and Ramesh Chandra Sen, joint general secretaries Mahbubul Alam Hanif, Dipu Moni, Abdur Rahman and Jahangir Kabir Nanok, office secretary Abdus Sobhan Golap, publicity and publication secretary Hasan Mahmud, law secretary SM Rezaul Karim, law minister Anisul Huq, Samyabadi Dal general secretary Dilip Barua, Bangladesh Workers Party president Rashed Khan Menon, president of a faction of Jatiya Samajtantrik Dal Hasanul Haq Inu and president of another faction of the Jatiya Samajtantrik Dal Moin Uddin Khan Badal, according to a party press release.A 16-member team, led by the Jatiya Oikya Front leader Kamal Hossain will join the talks. Senior BNP leaders including party secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir are in the delegation.On 28 October, Kamal Hossain wrote to the prime minister for dialogue in order to hold the national election in a free and fair manner.The prime minister on 29 agreed to hold the dialogue and invited Kamal Hossain to join it at Ganabhaban.last_img read more

Bangladeshi survivor recalls Tunisia boat capsize

first_imgA survivor of a boat carrying migrants that sunk in the Mediterranean during the night of 9 and 10 May rests at a shelter in the Tunisian coastal city of Zarzis on 11 May, 2019. Photo: AFPA Bangladeshi farmer watched dozens drown beside him in the Mediterranean before “God sent us the fishermen”, who saved him from the cold waters and took him to Tunisia.Ahmed Bilal was one of 16 survivors of the shipwreck, in which an estimated 60 people died on Friday while trying to reach Italy.”I can’t stop myself crying,” said Bilal, who lost two younger relatives in the accident, from a Red Crescent emergency centre in the southern Tunisian coastal town of Zarzis.The 30-year-old said he began his journey to Europe six months ago, flying with three others to Dubai and onwards to Istanbul in Turkey.From there they took another flight to the Libyan capital Tripoli, Bilal said, where they joined around 80 other Bangladeshis and were held in a room in western Libya for three months.”I already thought I would die in Libya,” he said. “We had food only once a day, sometimes less. There was one toilet for 80 people. We could not wash — only our teeth — and we were crying, begging for food.”Medical charity Doctors Without Borders (MSF) estimates 6,000 migrants in Libya are being detained “in conditions that generally fall well below international standards”. Survivors of a boat carrying migrants that sunk in the Mediterranean during the night of 9 and 10 May, gather at a shelter in the Tunisian coastal city of Zarzis on 11 May, 2019. Photo: AFPThe situation has worsened since eastern commander Khalifa Haftar launched an offensive to take Tripoli last month, with more than 450 people killed due to fighting linked to that military campaign, according to the World Health Organization.- ‘I have nothing now’ -Bilal had no idea what he would face when he embarked on the journey from Bangladesh’s Sylhet region, where he had seen villagers with relatives in Europe live a better life.After his family sold their land, the father of two paid a Bangladeshi smuggler nicknamed “Good Luck” around $7,000 (6,230 euros) to arrange the trip.”He said we would have a better life and we believed him. I am sure most of the people he sends die on the way”, said Bilal.He and the other migrants left northwestern Libya on a large boat, before being transferred to a smaller one.Manzour Mohammed Metwella, an Egyptian who was on board, said the boat “started to sink almost immediately.””We swam all night,” said the 21-year-old.Survivors said all the passengers were men, with 51 from Bangladesh, three Egyptians, several Moroccans, Chadians and other Africans.After seeing people drown in front of his eyes, Bilal said he “was losing hope myself, but God sent us the fishermen who saved us.”The fishermen were able to rescue 14 Bangladeshis, one Moroccan, and the Egyptian Metwella.”If the Tunisian fishermen hadn’t seen them, there wouldn’t have been any survivors and we would have never known about this” boat sinking, said Mongi Slim from the Red Crescent.The survivors now have 60 days to decide whether to return home, seek asylum through the United Nations refugee agency, or try their luck in Tunisia.But there is no asylum law in Tunisia and residents are already facing high unemployment and overstretched public services.”We lost so much, I have nothing now,” said Bilal, admitting he still wants to reach Europe to earn money.”But I don’t want to go on the sea like this again, I am done with this risk.”Humanitarian organisations have faced hostility from governments for running rescue missions in the Mediterranean.last_img read more