Decision will be made when Persaud returns – President

first_img…maintains he’s on vacation leave, not admin leaveCommander-in-Chief, President David Granger has revealed that the Administration would decide the next move as it relates to the suitability of Top Cop Seelall Persaud, to lead the Guyana Police Force.Police Commissioner Seelall PersaudPersaud was slated to return to work on November 24 after being on four months’ vacation leave, but was asked to remain on leave “in the interest of public” by Public Security Minister Khemraj Ramjattan.In a letter, the Minister instructed Persaud to proceed on “special leave” until further notice in the interest of the public, so as to allow for the continuation of initiatives and innovations being pursued by the Guyana Police Force’s temporary administration.That move was translated by social commentators as Persaud getting the boot following the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry (CoI) into the alleged plot to assassinate President Granger.The President, however, on Wednesday said that Persaud has not been asked to proceed on administrative leave rather he was merely asked to use up his remaining annual leave. He noted that the coalition Government was not in favour of public servants accumulating leave which sometimes result in them requesting payment for that time.“Right now, there is nothing abnormal or irregular about Mr Seelall Persaud going on leave. The leave is due to him; he is not being sent on administrative leave; the leave is due to him and he should enjoy it,” he added.On March 29, Andriff Gillard reported to the Police that his friend and neighbour, Nizam Khan, had offered him $7 million to assassinate the President. He said the offer was made during a conversation between Khan and himself after he had approached Khan to borrow $6 million to purchase a property.Following the allegation, President Granger commissioned an inquiry to investigate how the Police had done their investigation of the allegation, and to make recommendations to address flaws and shortcomings of the Police Force.Retired Assistant Police Commissioner Paul Slowe headed the CoI. In his recommendations, Slowe suggested that disciplinary actions be taken against Police Commissioner Persaud and that he be made to resign and investigated for perjury.The Commission found that a proper investigation was not conducted into the allegation made by Gillard, owing to the interference of Persaud. Slowe reported that the response by the Police was conditioned by the fact that Imran Khan, brother of the accused, has a close relationship with Persaud and other senior ranks of the Police Force. In addition, the Commission found that Imran had considerable influence in the decisions of Persaud in relation to promotions and transfers, which ultimately resulted in the investigative ranks being apprehensive.“The Commission recommends that Commissioner Seelall Persaud should be made to resign his position as the Commissioner of Police for the Guyana Police Force, under such terms and conditions that His Excellency considers appropriate.Failing which, proceedings should be initiated in accordance with Article 225 of the Constitution of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana to have him removed from the office for misbehaviour,” the report stated.It was also recommended that Persaud be investigated for perjury since he told the CoI that he first knew about the allegation after 16:00h on March 29, in spite of Assistant Police Commissioner Clifton Hicken testifying that he informed Persaud of the allegation around 10:00h that morning.However, Ramjattan expressed the opinion that he was not in agreement with all of the recommendations of the report, and noted that before they were acted upon, they would have to be deliberated at Cabinet.last_img read more

Computer software sets new record for solving jigsaw puzzle

first_img Explore further © 2010 PhysOrg.com Assembling the jigsaw puzzle of drug addiction The graphical model, developed by Taeg Sang Cho and colleagues can solve puzzles of any image or photograph with a full range of colors, while the previous jigsaw solvers could only handle sharp images of limited colors. The previous record for jigsaw-solving by a computer was achieved in 2008 by a team of Danish scientists, and solved a puzzle consisting of 320 pieces. Their method used cartoons with clear structures and well-defined edges and sharp colors, and the pieces were cut in traditional shapes, which made it easier to solve than a puzzle in which every piece is square. In their experiments, the team chopped 5-megabyte pictures into 400 squares and fed the data from each into their computer software. The software analyzed the major colors in the squares and arranged them in groups of similar colors. It then referred to a database of images to arrange the pieces in their most likely positions to produce an initial low resolution image. So, for example, a puzzle with a mixture of green, gray and blue would be interpreted as a landscape and the software would first group the bright pieces and blue pieces at the top (since objects in or near the sky are generally brighter, and the sky is often blue), the gray in the middle, interpreted as buildings, and green in the foreground, interpreted as vegetation.When the pieces were arranged in their approximate positions the computer then checked the pixel colors on the boundaries of each piece and identified neighboring pieces that most closely matched the colors. The software fixed a small number of pieces, called anchor patches, and refined the layout for the remaining pieces to reconstruct the original picture. Using their system, the software was able to successfully reconstruct 20 test images, and could solve a 400-piece puzzle in only three minutes.Cho said that since the software is expert at finding pieces that blend well, it may help make edited pictures more realistic in the future. Cho also hopes the software could be useful for other scientific problems, such as DNA/RNA modeling or reassembling fragments of documents or archaeological relics, all of which can be modeled as jigsaw puzzles. The paper will be presented at the 2010 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) to be held in San Francisco on the 15th to 17th of June. (PhysOrg.com) — Completing jigsaw puzzles is a challenging and popular hobby, but now scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the U.S. and Tel Aviv University in Israel have for the first time developed a probabilistic graphical model to solve a jigsaw puzzle consisting of 400 square pieces. More information: Project website: people.csail.mit.edu/taegsang/JigsawPuzzle.html Two examples of reconstructed images using the estimated local evidence. Please see the original paper for details. Image: Taeg Sang Cho. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Computer software sets new record for solving jigsaw puzzle (2010, May 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-05-software-jigsaw-puzzle.htmllast_img read more