WHS GIRLS TENNIS Wildcats Near Perfect Against Stoneham

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The WHS Girls Varsity Tennis Team defeated Stoneham, 5-0, on Monday, April 29, 2019 at Wilmington High School.Wilmington senior Emily Hill defeated Sophia Perillo, 6-0, 6-0.Wilmington junior Carolyn Roney defeat Stephanie Lee, 6-0, 6-1.Wilmington senior Lia Kourkoutas defeated Bridget Trecy, 6-0, 6-0.Wilmington senior Jessica D’Arco and sophomore Lauren D’Arco defeated Sydney Shephard and Tara Hacke, 6-0, 6-1.Wilmington sophomore Vrdhi Shah and sophomore Johanna Robinson defeated Maryjane McAllister and Brynn Hespeler, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4).Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWHS GIRLS TENNIS: Wildcats Defeat Stoneham & Wakefield On Back-To-Back DaysIn “Sports”WHS GIRLS TENNIS: Wilmington Sweeps MelroseIn “Sports”WHS GIRLS TENNIS: Wildcats Win Third Matchup In Three DaysIn “Sports”last_img read more

RBL Bank acquires 10 stake in Utkarsh Micro Finance shares rise

first_imgPrivate-sector lender RBL Bank on Monday announced acquisition of a 9.99% stake in Utkarsh Micro Finance Ltd (UMFL). The acquisition is seen as a strategic move to reach out to the unbanked and underbanked segments of the society.The bank is also entering into an MoU to extend its product portfolio to Utkarsh customers. In a statement, the bank said it has got all the necessary regulatory approvals. UMFL has received in-principle approval from the RBI for setting up a small finance bank and is expected to commence operations soon.”This is a strategic partnership rather than a mere acquisition of a minority stake in Utkarsh, one of India’s finest and well-governed micro finance institutions. Personally, I am very happy and excited to be a part of this partnership. It will help us extend our distribution footprint and strengthen our financial inclusion initiatives across the rural hinterland,” Vishwavir Ahuja, RBL Bank Managing Director and CEO, said in the statement.In other news, RBL Bank said it has raised Rs 330 crore (about $50 million) from CDC Group Plc, a UK-based development finance institution, through Basel III compliant Tier II capital. The capital infusion will help the bank expand to new regions in India.The fund-raising will also strengthen its capital base to meet future requirements. This is the third round of funding the private-sector lender received in two-and-a-half years. Previously, in October 2015, the bank raised Rs 44.5 crore, and in March 2014, it secured investment of Rs 174 crore.RBL Bank stock closed at Rs 297.10 on Monday, up 1.97 from its previous close on the Bombay Stock Exchange.last_img read more

Multinational effort underway to build synthetic yeast using artificial chromosomes

first_img ‘Synthetic’ chromosome permits repid, on-demand ‘evolution’ of yeast (Phys.org) —A multinational effort to replicate the genome of brewer’s yeast has been launched. Led by Professor Jef Boeke of John Hopkins University in Baltimore, and with teams in China, India, Great Britain and other countries, the goal of the effort is to build artificial chromosomes to replace the 16 normally found in yeast cells. If successful, the effort will mark the first time the entire genome of an organism with a nucleus has been artificially replicated. © 2013 Phys.org Sacharomyces cerevisiae cells in DIC microscopy. Credit: Wikipedia. Citation: Multinational effort underway to build synthetic yeast using artificial chromosomes (2013, July 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-07-multinational-effort-underway-synthetic-yeast.htmlcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Besides the possibility of providing new insights into how chromosomes work, the project hopes to also serve as a means of learning how to program an organism by altering its genetic functions. Yeast with artificial chromosomes, for example, could be programmed to serve as an engine to manufacture antibiotics, vaccines, biofuels, etc., instead of alcohol.A team of scientists successfully replaced the DNA of a bacteria cell back in 2010, but it had no nucleus, meaning it was a much simpler organism. Replicating all of the chromosomes in a yeast cell will require far more effort. For that reason, the work has been split between teams working at various facilities around the world. Each team will design one chromosome on a computer, which will then be sent to a central facility for its actual creation. Once all of the teams have built their chromosomes, a single yeast cell will be stripped of its natural chromosomes to be replaced by their artificial counterparts—giving it an entirely artificial genome. The project is expected to be expensive—the British team alone has received £1m from the U.K government to fulfill its part in the project which is expected to be completed by 2017.The yeast cell was picked for the project because it is a relatively simple organism—it’s one celled and has only 6000 genes. One the other hand, it’s sufficiently complex to further the science of bioengineering. Another plus is that yeast, because of its ability to convert sugars to alcohol, is seen as a becoming a more useful organism if its DNA could be controlled directly by creating new chromosomes in the lab and replacing the ones that nature gave it.last_img read more