Hernia Int’l Performs ‘Free Surgeries’ on 208 Patients

first_imgThe doctors posed shortly after the farewell ceremonyAn International humanitarian organization known as “Hernia International” in collaboration with the E&J Medical Center in Ganta, Nimba County, has completed another phase of “free surgical service” on patients with hernia-related diseases.The medical team of doctors from Spain was headed by Dr. Ceasar Rimarer. They performed 208 surgeries on those with hernia-related cases from April 20 – 29, 2018.Children who were diagnosed of hydrocele and women with umbilical hernia were among patients that benefited from the operation. A hydrocele is a type of swelling in the scrotum that occurs when fluid collects in the thin sheath surrounding a testicle. It is common in newborns and usually disappears without treatment by age 1, a medical research has shown. The operation brought relief to hundreds of underprivileged people, who have been suffering from the disease without any hope of treatment due to lack of money for many years.“I thank these doctors and E&J family for providing the free service for us,” said one Evelyn, a mother of a 7-year-old boy who benefited from the exercise.In November 2017, a team of doctors from Slovenia, representing Hernia International, also conducted “free surgical operation” for people with the disease at the same venue.Some of beneficiaries waiting in OPDThe team’s visit  marked the fourth since the E&J Medical Center, in collaboration with Hernia International, began the free medical operation.Meanwhile, the Chief Executive Officer of the hospital Representative Jeremiah Koung has also thanked the Spanish team for the operation, adding, “nobody can pay for what you have done.”The hospital’s administrator Victor Kpaiseh gave one of the Spanish doctors a traditional name, “Luah,” which in the Dan language means blessing. The name “Luah” derived from the way the doctor was directing members of the team to remain focus as they performed each of the hernia cases.Kpaiseh then called on members of the team to always remember the hospital and consider it as their own.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Region 2’s Early Childhood Centres to be commissioned soon

first_imgTwo Early Childhood Development Centres in Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam) are to be commissioned this month. The facilities are stationed at Suddie and Dartmouth.This was made possible through a collaborative effort between the Basic Needs Trust Fund (BNTF) and the office of Presidential Advisor on Youth Empowerment Unit (PAYEU). The contract was awarded to Builder’s Hardware and GeneralRegional Executive Officer (REO), Rupert HopkinsonSupplies at a cost of $32,655,130 and was part of several projects signed under the seventh BNTF programme.Regional Executive Officer (REO), Rupert Hopkinson said the centres are “a wonderful initiative that will not only help with the development of the children as they aim to meet their full potential but the development of the country.” According to the REO, these centres will provide training for unemployed and underemployed youths in the region.Hopkinson disclosed that Finance Minister Winston Jordan; junior Minister Jaipaul Sharma; Presidential Advisor on Youth Empowerment Aubrey Norton; and Chairman of BNTF oversight entity, Bernard Lord; among other Government officials will be attending the official commissioning ceremony of the centres at Dartmouth.Last year, the Ministry of the Presidency through the Office of the First Lady, and the Ministry of Social Protection facilitated an early childhood development workshop for 38 women. The aim was to provide the stakeholders with basic information and skills in early childhood development and nurturing care practices for the growth and development of young children.last_img read more

Civic leader Gonthier dies

first_imgWHITTIER – Isabelle E. Gonthier, two-time president of the Rio Hondo College Board and a major force in establishing the first campus child-care center for student-mothers, died Monday at Kaiser Hospital in Fontana after a brief illness. She was 79. Gonthier served 12 years on the college board, from 1981 to 1993. Gonthier was born July 4, 1927 in Ontario, but raised as a beach girl in Venice where she attended Venice High School. On weekends, she and her friends spent a lot of time diving for coins thrown into the water off of the Venice pier. She quit high school in her senior year to marry Jim Brown, a sailor. The young couple became parents of four sons, Richard, Fred, John and Chuck. In the mid-1950s, the family moved to Seattle, where her husband worked on projects for the 1962 World’s Fair. When the fair opened, the family returned to Whittier, where Brown opened a welding business that became quite successful. Isabelle concentrated on raising her sons. She was active in the PTA at Loma Vista, Carmela and Sierra High School and supported her children’s sports and student theater activities. When son Fred graduated and joined the Air Force, like his older brother Richard, Isabelle went back to work at the local Teen Post program serving South Whittier and Santa Fe Springs. At that time, she also obtained her GED and enrolled at Rio Hondo College. After receiving her associate’s degree, she became a counselor for the state’s Department of Rehabilitation in Whittier. She quickly became a strong advocate for disabled people. She worked with the city of Santa Fe Springs to organize an award-winning state conference on helping people with disabilities. She was then promoted to assistant to the state director for the Department of Rehabilitation, serving in that capacity until the director retired. Shortly after that, her husband died. Gonthier returned to her state job in Whittier and also won election to the Rio Hondo College Board of Trustees. When her time on the board was up, Gonthier would recall that one of her proudest accomplishments on the board was the building of an on-campus child care center for young mothers attending college. Manuel Baca, current interim Rio Hondo president, was vice president of the college’s student services during Gonthier’s tenure. “We run a very nice day care facility here now, in large part due to Isabelle Gonthier’s persistence,” Baca said. At the urging of her friend, the late Gus Carras, Gonthier transferred to the state’s Department of Labor, where she served as deputy labor commissioner until she retired. In retirement she managed real estate investments, became a certified hospice care volunteer and enjoyed her 12 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. She is survived by her brother, Bob Tucker of Maryland; four sons, Richard, a retired trucker in Texas, Fred, a retired teacher in Georgia, John, executive director of Family Services of Desert Living in Desert Hot Springs, and Chuck, self- employed in Desert Hot Springs; and her grandchildren. There will be a public viewing from 3 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday at Rose Hills Mortuary and Memorial Park, 3600 Workman Mill Road, Whittier. Her funeral will be at 11 a.m. Monday in SkyRose Chapel at Rose Hills, followed immediately by a graveside service.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

How many Ebola cases are there really

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img Does WHO acknowledge that the numbers are too low?Absolutely. In August, it said that the reported numbers “vastly underestimate” the epidemic’s magnitude. WHO’s situation updates frequently point out gaps in the data. The 8 October update, for instance, noted that there had been a fall in cases in Liberia the previous 3 weeks, but this was “unlikely to be genuine,” the report said. “Rather, it reflects a deterioration in the ability of overwhelmed responders to record accurate epidemiological data. It is clear from field reports and first responders that [Ebola] cases are being under-reported from several key locations, and laboratory data that have not yet been integrated into official estimates indicate an increase in the number of new cases in Liberia.”Where do the reported numbers come from, and why are they always too low?Officially, the governments of Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia transmit the numbers to WHO, which then passes them on to the world. But WHO is also closely involved in helping determine the numbers. The data come from several sources, says WHO epidemiologist Christopher Dye; the three main ones are clinics and treatment centers, laboratories doing Ebola tests, and burial teams.Getting the numbers right is hard for many reasons. Many patients don’t seek medical care, for instance, because they don’t trust the medical system or because they live too far away. Of those who do, some die along the way, and some are turned away because treatment centers are overloaded. Of Ebola people who die at home, some are buried without ever coming to officials’ attention. It can also take time for recorded information to be passed on and entered into data reporting systems.Testing is a big problem as well. The reports break down the numbers into suspected cases, based mostly on symptoms; probable cases, in which someone had symptoms and a link to a known Ebola case; and confirmed cases, in which a patient sample tested positive in the lab. In an ideal world, all suspected and probable cases would eventually be tested, but testing capacity is lacking. In WHO’s 15 October report, only 56% of the cases in the three countries was confirmed; in Liberia, where testing is huge problem, it was just 22%. (Friday’s report did not break down Liberia’s cases and said the data were “temporarily unavailable.”)Dye says WHO and other groups are trying hard to improve the reporting on the ground. Among other things, they are trying to set up a system that would provide every patient with a unique identification number. Now, Dye says, patients who enter an Ebola clinic and then have a sample tested in the lab may enter the reports twice, because there is no way to know that the lab and the clinic were recording the same patient.Are there ways to estimate the extent of the underreporting?There are. For instance, In a technique called capture-recapture, epidemiologists visit one area or district and determine what percentage of the Ebola cases and deaths there has found its way into official records. “You throw out the net twice, and you compare,” says Martin Meltzer of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, who is modeling the Ebola epidemic. (The term capture-recapture was borrowed from researchers who study the size of wildlife populations using two rounds of trapping.) But this method is logistically challenging and possibly dangerous, given the hostilities that some Ebola response teams have met, Meltzer says: “I’m not going to ask people to risk their lives to collect some data.”For a paper published last month, Meltzer and his colleagues used a different technique. CDC has a computer model that, among other things, calculates how many hospital beds should be in use at any given time based on the cumulative number of cases at that moment. For 28 August, the time the paper was written, that number was 143 beds for Liberia; but people in the field told Meltzer that the actual number of beds in use was 320, a factor of 2.24 higher. (These numbers can be found in an annex to the paper.) “We had heard some other numbers that were higher, so we rounded that up to a correction factor of 2.5,” Meltzer says. But it’s a very rough approximation. Also, underreporting is likely to vary greatly from one place to another and over time, he says.The CDC team’s widely reported worst case projection of 1.4 million cases by 20 January was based on the correction factor of 2.5, and assuming control efforts didn’t improve. It included only Liberia and Sierra Leone; in Guinea, the reported numbers of cases have fluctuated too much to make a reasonable projection, Meltzer says, which could also could be partly due to underreporting.What does WHO think is a reasonable correction factor?WHO hasn’t published an estimate. “It’s a point that has been greatly discussed but there is a tremendous amount of uncertainty,” Dye says. For its internal planning purposes, however, WHO uses a correction factor of 2.0. When WHO’s Bruce Aylward said at a press conference last week that the agency is expecting to see between 5000 and 10,000 cases per week by early December, “the difference between the 5000 and the 10,000 is that factor of two,” Dye says. A correction factor of 2.0 would mean that the total number of cases has now crossed 18,000 and the number of deaths 9000.If the numbers are that far off, should they be published at all? Even if many cases are missed, the trends in the numbers are still very meaningful. They clearly show that the number of cases has roughly doubled every 3 to 4 weeks and that this trend is continuing. If underreporting  gets worse, however, it may be even more difficult to discern such trends.Is there any good news in the recent numbers?There is. The number of new cases in some areas at the epicenter of the outbreak—Kenema and Kailahun districts in Sierra Leone and Liberia’s Lofa County—has been dropping, and that’s not a result of underreporting, Dye says. “It has happened for a sufficiently large number of weeks now that we are confident that it’s a real reduction in incidence on the ground, probably related to control measures,” he says. “Our colleagues working on the ground believe it is, too.”One important factor has been the increase in safe burials, Dye says. (The bodies of Ebola victims are very infectious.) People in the affected areas have resisted abandoning traditional burial practices that carry a high risk of infection, but in these three areas, local leaders, supported by WHO and others, have come to advocate a change. If that happens elsewhere, Dye says, “we expect to be able to cut out a substantial amount of infection in the community.”*The Ebola Files: Given the current Ebola outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made a collection of research and news articles on the viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public. Every couple of days, the World Health Organization (WHO) issues a “situation update” on the Ebola epidemic, with new numbers of cases and deaths for each of the affected countries. These numbers―9216 and 4555 respectively, according to Friday’s update―are instantly reported and tweeted around the world. They’re also quickly translated into ever-more frightening graphics by people who follow the epidemic closely, such as virologist Ian Mackay of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and Maia Majumder, a Ph.D. student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge who visualizes the data on her website and publishes projections on HealthMap, an online information system for outbreaks.But it’s widely known that the real situation is much worse than the numbers show because many cases don’t make it into the official statistics. Underreporting occurs in every disease outbreak anywhere, but keeping track of Ebola in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone has been particularly difficult. And the epidemic unfolds, underreporting appears to be getting worse. (“It’s a mess,” Mackay says.)So what do the WHO numbers really mean—and how can researchers estimate the actual number of victims? Here are answers to some key questions.last_img read more