‘Rubber not Solution to Liberia’s Food Security’

first_imgAs drop in the price of rubber continues to raise concern among farmers across Liberia, the head of the Fellowship of Christian Councils and Churches in West Africa, Rev. Dr. Tolbert Thomas Jallah Jr. has asserted that rubber is not the solution to Liberia’s food crisis.Speaking at a program at the Township of Geepoe recently, he was quoted by Radio Kehgheaman (in Nimba County) on April 24 that rubber planting makes labourers out of Liberians.He explained that Liberia has a large fertile land, but instead of Liberians being encouraged to plant crops that are more needed, “we are encouraged to plant rubber or palm which are shipped to other countries.”Rev. Dr Jallah, who came to Nimba upon the invitation of Rep. Larry P. Younquio, told local church leaders to grow what they can eat and eat what they grow.“Why are you planting trees that benefit other people when you are still importing rice and buying frozen imported meat?” he asked them.Rev. Jallah urged local church leaders to engage in food production to be able to feed their congregations instead of collecting offerings or tithes and allowing them to go hungry.He said Jesus whose footprint they are following fed over 5000 followers with the little he had, and observed that no church leader has ever provided food for their congregations after his regular discourse.He noted that nearly everything imported to Liberia, including meat, fish, rice and vegetables can be produced in Liberia. “It only needs our total involvement like how we have been involved in planting rubber trees,” Rev. Jallah said.Nimba County remains one of the chief rubber producers in the country where most farm lands are covered with rubber trees.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Downtown Houston Flooding On Monday Mimicked Last Memorial Day

first_img– / 3Downtown got only about 6 inches of rain but more than twice that fell miles away in Northwest Houston along the White Oak  Bayou watershed.That water ended-up where the Bayou merges with Buffalo Bayou in downtown Houston.Floodwaters topped street bridges near the University of Houston Downtown main campus.In the nearby Theater District, maintenance workers erected a four foot high metal floodgate across a loading dock that faces the bayou.Northwest of downtown in the Heights, just like what happened Memorial Day last year, White Oak Bayou Drive went underwater, inundating a few units and a few cars in a condo complex.The Katy Freeway at Taylor Street flooded, routing big trucks through otherwise quiet residential streets.Where Houston Avenue dives down under Memorial Drive, the underpass flooded.But unlike in past floods,  one of the newly installed flood warning gates came to life, it’s arm dropping down to block drivers, a yellow warning light came on to call attention to a “road closed” sign.The gate was installed last summer and the city hopes to someday have the automatic warning barriers at a total of 27 flood-prone underpasses. Sharelast_img read more