ABBEY HOTEL SET TO SHOWCASE ITS CIVIL CEREMONY SUITE AT WEDDING FAYRE

first_imgLast year ‘The Wedding Showcase’ event was a great success and attracted exhibitors from near and far to Donegal Town and this year promises to be even bigger and better. On Sunday the 8th of March the Abbey Hotel will be open to all to showcase its Civil Ceremony Suite, Wedding function areas and bridal suites to visiting guests.The Bay View Banqueting Suite overlooking the river Eske and Donegal Bay and The Diamond Suites are transformed and filled with a varied selection of our trusted wedding suppliers. There will be advice available from the leading wedding experts to answer any question from couples planning their big day.Join us for a Champagne reception with Canapés and live entertainment by The Dream Day Wedding band.Relax and unwind in the Bridal Pamper Zone or have a speciality cocktail in the VIP area where you can enjoy the 3 different Fashion Shows taking place over the course of the day.There will be Bridal Dresses, Menswear, Wedding Attire and a very special secret finale show by Pearls & Lace, Rosewoods, Peter’s Man Shop and Magee of Donegal Town. Come early to enter the fantastic competitions and giveaways being held throughout the day and avail of great supplier discounts available during the event.Attendance at the Wedding Showcase at The Abbey Hotel Donegal Town on Sunday 1st March from 1pm to 5pm is complimentary.Full list of Exhibitors hereFor more information call Shona on 0871686161 or email Shona@abbeyhoteldonegal.com ABBEY HOTEL SET TO SHOWCASE ITS CIVIL CEREMONY SUITE AT WEDDING FAYRE was last modified: March 6th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BusinessFeaturesnewslast_img read more

Van Allen Belts Protect Earth from Solar Wind

first_imgGeophysicists are still puzzling over how the earth’s magnetic field and Van Allen radiation belts protect the surface from deadly particles in the solar wind.The Van Allen belts are lobes of high-energy particles above the atmosphere, formed as a consequence of the geomagnetic field. First discovered in 1958 by Dr James Van Allen of the University of Iowa, using instruments aboard the Explorer satellites designed by JPL spacecraft pioneer Dr. Henry Richter, these belts have long puzzled scientists. A pair of spacecraft called the Van Allen Probes have been gathering data about the belts since 2012. NASA’s Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) also gathered data since 2015. Elizabeth Howell provides this overview of the Van Allen Belts on Space.com. She says,On the 60th anniversary of Explorer 1, NASA said that studies of the Van Allen belts are even more important today. “Our current technology is ever more susceptible to these accelerated particles because even a single hit from a particle can upset our ever smaller instruments and electronics,” said David Sibeck, Van Allen Probes mission scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, in a 2018 statement. “As technology advances, it’s actually becoming even more pressing to understand and predict our space environment.“Here are additional news items about what these structures do for us.Shock at the BowHow Solar Wind Drops from Gale to Gentle Breeze as It Hits Earth’s Magnetic Field (University of Maryland). Animations of the solar wind often show particles streaming out from the sun directly at the earth, but our planet actually plows through the field along its orbital path, increasing the speed at which the particles impinge on our home were it not for planetary protection provided by the magnetic field.  The press release explains,Bow shock (blue) with Van Allen Belts inside (pink). Credit: NASA. Click image for details.As Earth orbits the sun at supersonic speed, it cuts a path through the solar wind. This fast stream of charged particles, or plasma, launched from the sun’s outer layers would bombard Earth’s atmosphere if not for the protection of Earth’s magnetic field.Just as the nose of a motorboat creates a bow-shaped wave as it pushes through the water, Earth creates a similar effect—called a bow shock—as it pushes through the solar wind. A new University of Maryland-led study describes the first observations of the process of electron heating that happens in Earth’s bow shock.The paper is published in Physical Review Letters. They found bad news before they understood the good news:The researchers found that when the electrons in the solar wind encounter the bow shock, they momentarily accelerate to such a high speed that the electron stream becomes unstable and breaks down. This breakdown process robs the electrons of their high speed and converts the energy to heat….“If you were to stand on a mountaintop, you might get knocked over by a fast wind,” explained Li-Jen Chen, lead author of the study and an associate research scientist in the UMD department of astronomy. “Fortunately, as the solar wind crashes into Earth’s magnetic field, the bow shock protects us by slowing down this wind and changing it to a nice, warm breeze. We now have a better idea how this happens.”It’s not friction, therefore, that slows down the killer electrons; it’s breakdown of the electron stream due to instability. This is a new discovery from spacecraft measurements. “The study of electron heating is important not just for understanding how the bow shock protects Earth, but potentially for satellites, space travel and maybe exploring other planets in the future,” says Li-Jen Chen of the University of Maryland, lead author of the study. Her comment raises the question whether exoplanets could be habitable without such mechanisms. Richter’s book Spacecraft Earth raises the question whether a protective magnetic field could survive for millions of years.Earth’s Magnetic Field is A Ruthless, Solar-Wind-Shredding Machine (Space.com). Brandon Specktor notes that the breakdown of the electron stream occurs in just 90 milliseconds – nine one-hundredths of a second. If it weren’t for this newly-discovered process, he says, earth would be fried:Earth is constantly being bombarded by a hot, soupy plasma of protons, electrons and ions loosed by the sun in the form of solar wind. These winds blow all day and in all directions, blasting out of our nearest star at speeds of up to 500 miles per second (800 kilometers per second) and temperatures of up to 2.9 million degrees Fahrenheit (1.6 million degrees Celsius), according to NASA. You’d think that would be more than enough to bake our planet into a giant, orbiting lump of ash, but Earth and its atmosphere remain largely unscathed thanks to the planet’s strong magnetic field.Scientists are still trying to understand these processes, the article ends. “But for now, enjoy the gentle winds of summer — and know, somewhere out there, that Earth’s magnetic field is violently ripping billions of solar electrons to bits on your behalf.”Van Allen Radiation Belts within the magnetic field (NASA).Chirping Birds and Swing PushersWhat Causes Radiation Belt Enhancements: A Survey of the Van Allen Probes Era (Geophysical Research Letters). With an animation of electrons under the influence of the magnetic field, a press release from NASA-Goddard explains how electrons become excited within the belts.Encircling Earth are two enormous rings — called the Van Allen radiation belts — of highly energized ions and electrons. Various processes can accelerate these particles to relativistic speeds, which endanger spacecraft unlucky enough to enter these giant bands of damaging radiation. Scientists had previously identified certain factors that might cause particles in the belts to become highly energized, but they had not known which cause dominates.Now, with new research from NASA’s Van Allen Probes and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms — THEMIS — missions, published in Geophysical Research Letters, the verdict is in. The main culprit is a process known as local acceleration, caused by electromagnetic waves called chorus waves. Named after their characteristic rising tones, reminiscent of chirping birds, chorus waves speed up the particles pushing them along like a steady hand repeatedly pushing a swing. This process wasn’t a widely accepted theory before the Van Allen Probes mission.Additional InformationRadial Transport of Higher‐Energy Oxygen Ions Into the Deep Inner Magnetosphere Observed by Van Allen Probes (Geophysical Research Letters). “We suggest that the higher‐energy oxygen ions are transported to the inner magnetosphere selectively by the combination of two resonances: drift resonance and drift‐bounce resonance.”Explaining the apparent impenetrable barrier to ultra-relativistic electrons in the outer Van Allen belt (Nature Communications).Recent observations have shown the existence of an apparent impenetrable barrier at the inner edge of the ultra-relativistic outer electron radiation belt. This apparent impenetrable barrier has not been explained…. Contrary to earlier claims, sharp boundaries in fast loss processes at the barrier are not needed. Moreover, we show that penetration to the barrier can occur on the timescale of days rather than years as previously reported, with the Earthward extent of the belt being limited by the finite duration of strong solar wind driving, which can encompass only a single geomagnetic storm.Update 6/12/18: Astrobiology Magazine reports that European Space Agency (ESA) scientists are seeking to understand how the solar wind impacts rocks on the moon and Mercury. Most solar wind particles consist of hydrogen ions (protons) and helium ions, but some heavier atoms are in the mix, too. These particles can impact surface rocks at speeds of 400 to 800 km per second, shattering the rock and dislodging atoms in a process called sputtering. The erosional damage does not affect Earth:The planets and moons of our solar system are continuously being bombarded by particles hurled away from the sun. On Earth this has hardly any effect, apart from the fascinating northern lights, because the dense atmosphere and the magnetic field of the Earth protect us from these solar wind particles. But on the Moon or on Mercury things are different: There, the uppermost layer of rock is gradually eroded by the impact of sun particles.Constant bombardment and liberation of particles by sputtering creates a thin “exosphere” around the moon and Mercury that scientists can study remotely for clues about surface composition. “The effects of solar wind bombardment are in some cases much more drastic than previously thought,” the article explains, because heavier elements not only have more mass but can carry multiple levels of charge (i.e., they lack several electrons). Their impact on a surface can atomize rocks in a flash of kinetic and electrical energy.The article notes that “the uppermost layer of rock is gradually eroded by the impact of sun particles,” but did not mention what effects could be expected over millions or billions of years. The ESA’s first mission to Mercury, called BepiColombo is scheduled for launch in October 2018.We need to keep in mind these physical mechanisms as we “enjoy the gentle winds of summer,” realizing that multiple laws of physics and chemistry appear to have ‘conspired’ to work together for our benefit. Secular scientists would have us believe that there are so many stars and planets, life must be commonplace. They have a very permissive view of what chance can accomplish, both biologically and physically. In Spacecraft Earth, Dr. Richter identifies some 15 factors that work together to make our planet habitable. Using reasonable estimates of probability, he estimates that less than one planet in the universe would have all 15 factors! Of course, we know there is at least one. But is it reasonable to assume that habitable planets are a dime a dozen? Think how uncanny it is that physical processes that have nothing to do with life, like bow shocks and chorus waves, would play a role in protecting life far below, on the surface of a planet out of the range of their operations. The same argument could be made for physical processes under the earth’s surface, such as mineral transport and plate tectonics, and for physical processes within the biosphere, such as ocean currents and atmospheric circulation patterns. Additionally, there are astronomical considerations that make earth habitable, such as having the right kind of star, being the right distance from it, and having an axial tilt that gives rise to seassons. This doesn’t look like a haphazard arrangement of independent mindless processes. It supports what the Lord revealed in Isaiah 45:18For thus says the Lord, who created the heavens (he is God!), who formed the earth and made it (he established it; he did not create it empty, he formed it to be inhabited!): “I am the Lord, and there is no other.”(Visited 1,125 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Maritime cluster for Mandela Bay

first_imgA dedicated maritime cluster in theEastern Cape will boost regional economy.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free images, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Peter Myles  Coordinator: NMB maritime cluster  interim task team  +27 82 556 1680 • Tantaswa Cici  Manager: maritime safety, Eastern  Cape Department of Transport  +27 43 604 7629 or +27 71 673 5171 RELATED ARTICLES • Motor cluster will drive change • Safer seas for PE’s marine life • SA maritime industry set to grow • Aviation, maritime careers for youth • SA harbour chief makes world historyEmily van RijswijckPlans are afoot to create a dedicated maritime cluster for the port region of Nelson Mandela Bay (NMB) in the Eastern Cape in order to build on and enhance the city’s existing marine activities.The cluster idea is a joint initiative of the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality and the Nelson Mandela Bay Business Chamber. The first meeting of the partners took place in February in Port Elizabeth and was attended by 80 invited participants, all with a direct interest in the sector.“Port Elizabeth is historically a maritime city and yet for some reason it has never developed a maritime industry,” says Peter Myles, coordinator of the interim task team elected at the inaugural meeting to look into the viability of the venture.Myles is also chairman of the NMB Tourism Industry Association and a lecturer at NMMU in marine tourism and coastal recreation.The interim task team will appoint a steering committee, which will develop the policy, goals, strategy, actions and resources for a cluster framework aligned to the province’s integrated provincial maritime plan, currently under review.The steering committee will start by investigating the feasibility of ship building and other related industries, including the establishment of a maritime university.Port Elizabeth’s harbour, the fifth largest in South Africa, plays an important role in the movement of clean cargo, automotive parts and vehicles. The magnificent Port of Ngqura, now South Africa’s premier trans-shipment hub, lies a mere 20 km to the north.The Bay, as the city is fondly referred to, also has much to offer in terms of marine tourism. It’s home to one of the largest colonies of the endangered African penguin, and the marine section of the Greater Addo Elephant Park shares the bay area with the city.According to Myles, the main conclusion drawn at the first meeting was that the maritime sector could be a leading contributor to a sustainable provincial economy.Benefiting the greater communityThe maritime industry encompasses a vast array of activities and disciplines, among them designing, building and operating vessels; stevedoring and customs brokerage services; fisheries; the marine railways sector and the myriad industries involved in the maintenance and repair of vessels.Coastal and marine tourism and similar enterprises are also included in this sector.Some of these industries, such as stevedoring, are already in place in Port Elizabeth, while others, such as boatbuilding and repairs, are sorely lacking.In addition, Port Elizabeth remains a favourite tourist destination for South Africans, and international tourism numbers continue to grow.Estimates put the number of foreign visitors to Port Elizabeth in 2010 at 250 000 and domestics tourists in the same year at about 1-million, while the combined spend amounted to about R3-billion (US$386-million).Of special interest to potential cluster partners is the role such a combined effort can play in helping small to medium enterprises.“International experience indicates that the level of business formation tends to be higher in clusters,” says Myles. “Start-ups are more reliant on external suppliers and partners, all of which they find in a cluster, so clusters reduce the costs of failure, as entrepreneurs can fall back on local employment opportunities in the many other companies in the same field.”Clusters also encourage knowledge-sharing and innovation and in these areas NMMU has the potential to play a critical role, he adds.“Nelson Mandela Bay is a region where small-scale businesses and disadvantaged coastal communities could largely benefit, improving their job opportunities and their lives through application of a proposed micro-enterprise promotion strategy.”It is hoped that the cluster will stimulate the growth of smaller companies offering services such as boat building and repairs. It could also enhance the existing coastal and marine tourism sector and even, perhaps, encourage the creation of a maritime university.“In a nutshell, the expectation is that a maritime cluster will uncover Port Elizabeth’s competitive advantage and, with collaboration, will assist in the growth of this sector,” says Myles.Other clusters to boost local economyThe announcement of the maritime cluster follows closely on the heels of the recently launched Eastern Cape automotive cluster, which was formally inaugurated by trade and industry minister Rob Davis in March.Globally, clusters have become the norm in the creation of cross-industry linkages and complementary relationships. In Europe, maritime clusters are well established and offer their members a competitive advantage, says Myles.“In less than half a decade cluster development has become a common factor for economic development agencies in over 40 countries around the world. Clusters are the building blocks of a productive, innovative economy.”Port Elizabeth then and nowThe port area of Port Elizabeth is more than 180 years old. Following the arrival of British settlers in 1820 the harbour area became extremely busy, with mohair, wool and ostrich feathers the most common cargo shipped from the port.By 1825 Port Elizabeth was given port status with the appointment of a harbour master and, a year later, of a collector of customs.According to the Department of Transport 80% of the country’s trade is carried out by sea and it has therefore become necessary to prioritise the shipping industry.South Africa is one of the top 15 shipping countries in the world in terms of the tonnage transported to and from its ports.last_img read more

BMW SA expands export programme

first_img5 August 2013BMW South Africa has expanded its export programme to facilitate increased production and will export its BMW 3 Series from Maputo in Mozambique, in addition to shipping from the Durban port.“BMW South Africa has increased its production output with the introduction of a third shift, which was implemented towards the end of last year,” BMW South Africa managing director, Bodo Donauer, said in a statement last week.“Our overall annual production figure will increase from around 50 000 units per year to more than 80 000 units in 2013.The number of vehicles exported from South Africa will also more than double from 33 000 units to over 70 000 vehicles per year.“In line with this increase in volumes, we have had to look carefully at our export logistics and using Maputo in conjunction with our existing export supply chain in Durban makes sound business sense,” Donauer said.About 14 000 vehicles will be exported from the Maputo car terminal each year. Exports through Durban will also increase by approximately 20 000 vehicles – an increase of over 60% on current levels.“We have aligned our service offering of road freight logistics, clearing and forwarding and terminal services with the customs requirements of South Africa and Mozambique to provide an integrated process from the BMW vehicle distribution centre in Rosslyn to on-board the vessel in Maputo,” said Group Business Development executive at Grindrod Freight Services, Walter Grindrod.Grindrod is responsible for BMW South Africa’s road freight logistics, as well as serving as the private operator of the Maputo car terminal concession.“We have run trials to test the system and are confident the export route is sound. Going forward, we expect two shipments per month to take place with these export vehicles destined for markets in Japan and other parts of the East,” Grindrod said.Transport and logistics have long presented a challenge for South African automotive manufacturers, and the use of the Maputo terminal is envisaged to improve existing supply-chain corridors.“To play on a world stage, we need to ensure we are competitive in all elements of the manufacturing process including supply chain and logistics,” Donauer said.“The decision to use Maputo is the first step in ensuring the development of a robust, well thought out and competitive logistics network, which includes access via multiple SADC [Southern African Development Community] ports and can easily incorporate sea, rail and road freight.“The idea of a southern African development community is the ultimate vision for the type of supply chain needed to fully service South African manufacturers,” he said.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Young entrepreneurs need big business support

first_imgPolitical economist Siya Biniza emphasises the need for big business to act as mentors for young entrepreneurs.Political economist Siya Biniza believes South Africa’s youth possess great ideas that, with enough entrepreneurial verve, can be turned into thriving businesses. However, the only thing preventing them from chasing their dreams is the lack of support from big business.Speaking at a South African Competitiveness Forum research reference group held at Brand South Africa offices on Saturday, 18 August, Biniza said there is little support for young entrepreneurs in terms of finance and knowledge.Biniza, chief financial officer at Rethink Africa, a youth-led non-profit company that looks for alternative solutions to the continent’s economic challenges, said young entrepreneurs without prior business experience are not easily supported because funders are afraid of taking risks on them.Another factor impeding the growth of young businesspeople is intellectual property. Biniza said old entrants’ ideas are readily patented whereas new and young entrants are hardly considered because of the amount of money backers are risking. This occurs even though most business people know that one of the drivers of economic growth is innovation, he added. Fedusa secretary-general Dennis George says that if youth become active citizens, South Africa’s global competitiveness can be boosted. Despite Trevor Manuel’s efforts in getting youth involved with the National Development Plan (NDP), Biniza believes young men and women have not engaged with it as much as they could. “The youth need to take control of the NDP and make it ours by making leaders accountable.”Guest speaker Dennis George, secretary general of the neutral Federation of Unions of South Africa (Fedusa), said if youth become active citizens, South Africa’s global competiveness would be boosted.According to the 2014 World Competitiveness Yearbook published by Switzerland’s Institute of Management Development, South Africa’s competitiveness rose slightly in the last year, an indication that its productivity has increased. Its ranking improved from 53rd in 2013 to 52nd this year based on its economic growth.Despite increasing productivity, George said the number of jobs that have been lost in recent years has not been made up.Experience vs youthful enterpriseBiniza said successful entrepreneurs gain experience through making mistakes and learning from them. However, he said experience can hold young entrepreneurs back. “In as much as experience is important, it also inhibits creativity because the more you repeat a task, the more you get used to certain ways of doing things.”The advantage young people have, he added, is they are not “set in a way of conducting business” and have room to be creative; “We do whatever creative thing comes first.”But, he argued, entrepreneurs cannot be innovating all the time; there has to be a point where an idea becomes sustainable. This is when young entrepreneurs need experienced business people and even large corporations to be supportive.“If we are going to start talking about South Africa in 2030, it’s got to be about young people. It does not mean we are cutting big business out. Big business is very important in creating the development capacity of young entrepreneurs through their mentorship and making sure they procure from young businesses.”Biniza said big businesses may generate the most income, but they only employ 10% of the country’s population. Small- to medium-sized businesses, he said, are the backbone of the country’s economy, employing up to 90% of South Africans. In such a situation, small businesses need to access corporate funds for a cooperative form of monetary redistribution to occur.“We can measure the impact of the money you are sending off to smaller businesses,” said Biniza. “And this money can earn you returns if you create infrastructure such as social impact bonds, seed funding and venture capital frameworks. It’s about tapping into that money and having a collaborative approach to redistribution.”last_img read more

What We Started With

first_imgA leaky shellYou might say that everything above the mudsills was a modest bonus: a decent floor frame in the portion built on site, a ten-year-old roof in excellent condition, and a 12’x24′ deck. Oh, and a buried 250-gallon propane tank, still mostly full of gas.The house had a gas water heater and a gas furnace. The furnace was in a tiny attic-like spot in the 16’x32′ part, and I could see outdoors through the eave vents from the furnace location. The thermal boundary was, like the framing, creative.The blower door number was a tad over 3,100 cfm50 — about 0.63 cfm50 per square foot of shell area. We aim for 0.05 cfm50 per square foot of shell area at South Mountain, and frequently do better. In this project we reduced the leakage ratio 25:1. More on that to come. What Is a Deep Energy Retrofit?The High Cost of Deep-Energy Retrofits Did it make sense to buy a house that needed so much work?A sensible person may ask, Why did we buy this house anyway? We looked at a couple of parcels in West Tisbury (we were clear we wanted to stay in this town) and I felt that I didn’t want to go through the disturbance process that accompanies the development of raw land. I’ve been preaching that we need to fix what we have already built. I can assure you now that I have put my money, far too much of it in fact, where my mouth is.When all was said and done, we paid about $100,000 more for this house than a parcel would have cost, and we got an excellent well, a Title V compliant four-bedroom septic system (this is a good thing: we could expand), two underground electrical services — one 100-amp service for the outbuildings, and one 200-amp service for the house — two funky but useful outbuildings, an excellent concrete foundation housing 1,000 square feet of basement, and a developed site. One section of the house was moved here from EdgartownThe owner learned that there was a house in Edgartown that the property owner wanted to remove, and that the house was available for free if he moved it.The Edgartown house was a stubby L-shaped building, with a 16’x32′ section that contained a kitchen, bedroom, and bathroom, and a 22’x25′ section with living area.What I think happened — this is conjecture on my part — is that, in haste to get the project underway, the new foundation was possibly put into place before the conversation with the house mover occurred. I hypothesize that the house mover looked at the 22’x25′ piece and said it would be difficult/costly/impractical to move. So in the end the 16’x32′ portion was severed from the rest and moved, and the 22’x25′ section was duplicated new on site. RELATED ARTICLES In June 2013, Jill and I moved into our new house in West Tisbury on the island of Martha’s Vineyard.This house has an interesting history. The owner of the place had been living on the lot in a structure that began its life as the body of a box truck. It was 8’x16′ and had a small attached shed that housed the water pressure tank and the water heater. A small gambrel loft had been built on top; I could just barely sit up inside.There was a small gas heater, a 100-amp electric panel, a sink, and some built-ins. No shower. There was an outhouse on the property. You might say this was a tiny house before the Tiny House movement began. Marc Rosenbaum is director of engineering at South Mountain Company on the island of Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts. He writes a blog called Thriving on Low Carbon. Marc teaches a 10-week online Zero Net Energy Home Design course as part of NESEA’s Building Energy Master Series. You can test drive his class for free. The floor plan left a lot to be desiredThe floor plan had only one bedroom and the south side was very modestly glazed, so we knew we were in for an interior gutting project and major re-framing of the exterior openings. Note to self: this is expensive; it’s better to buy a house with a floor plan and orientation you like!Once the drywall and fiberglass were removed, it was clear that some creative structural design had been incorporated. The 16’x32′ portion had no structural ridge or ties across, so it was held up by paint. The rear had three substantial wood ties across at roughly 6 to 7 foot centers, but we needed to remove the drywall to see that each was attached to the wall with a single 1/2-inch-diameter lag screw — about 1/10th of the fastening capacity that the design load would merit. Good thing it hadn’t seen a significant snow load. BLOGS BY MARC ROSENBAUM Solving Our Design ProblemsMoving to a New HouseMinisplit Heat Pumps and Zero-Net-Energy HomesPractical Design Advice for Zero-Net-Energy HomesDuctless Minisplit Performance During Cold Weather All this happened in 2002-2003. I suspect the portion that was moved wasn’t much older than that, as the glass in the Andersen windows was dated 1996 and the walls were framed with 2x6s.The interior finish of the house was no great shakes: green carpet, white vinyl flooring, and inexpensive kitchen cabinets. There were some unpleasant odors, traceable to some rodent activity, and a 140-square-foot patch of basement floor where the water pipe came in from the well and the pressure tank and water heater sat; this area didn’t have a concrete slab, just crushed stone over filter fabric. Smelly soil gases.Plus, the insulation was in the ceiling of the basement, so the basement ran cold, which on Martha’s Vineyard means mold.There was a very creative outdoor shower, complete with clawfoot tub (see photo above). Bathtubs are another tale I’ll discuss in the future.last_img read more

New Series! Secrets of Self-Care

first_imgSelf-care is an important issue for caregivers and helping professionals.  A 2015 study conducted by the National Alliance for Caregiving and the AARP Public Policy Institute found that 35% of the caregivers who provide at least 20 hours of unpaid care each week want to have conversations with helping professionals about self-care, and that in many cases these conversations are not taking place.The Secrets of Self-Care series features research-based strategies to inspire wellness among busy caregivers and helping professionals.  Each installment highlights practices that have the potential to improve physical, mental and emotional functioning, while requiring little time and no money.  Videos, tips and additional resources make trying and sharing these self-care strategies easy.last_img read more

“Prachar Rath” to promote organic and natural farming in Rajasthan

first_imgA “Prachar Rath”, flagged off by Agriculture Minister Lal Chand Kataria on Wednesday, will promote organic and zero budget natural farming (ZBNF) among the farmers in Rajasthan to reduce agricultural input costs, encourage the use of bio-fertilisers, replace pesticides with traditional material and give tips for preparation of indigenous seeds.Flagging off the chariot at a public hearing event here, Mr. Kataria said the progressive farmers would be associated in large numbers with the drive which would continue till November 9. “Groups of farmers will visit the villages to generate awareness about the methods to increase agricultural production with innovative methods,” he said.Noted agriculturist Subhash Palekar, who has pushed for adoption of ZBNF, will train the farmers at a six-day-long camp beginning on September 24 at Sewar in Bharatpur district. This will be the first-ever training camp devoted to natural farming organised in the State.Mr. Kataria said the excessive use of chemicals was damaging the land’s fertility and adversely affecting people’s health. “The Prachar Rath’s dialogue with the farmers will apprise them of the benefits of using organic manure, vermicompost, crop residues and organic waste, while the weed, disease and pest control can be achieved through bio-materials and crop rotation.”The Union government’s Economic Survey of 2018-19 had advocated ZBNF as a “lucrative livelihood option” for small farmers. Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman had mentioned the method in her Budget speech as one of the innovative models through which the farmers’ income could be doubled by 2022.About 2,000 farmers have got themselves registered for the Sewar camp, where the research on forest vegetation as well as the techniques for natural growth of trees, based on Mr. Palekar’s “zero budget approach” to chemical-free farming involving manures and agro-ecology, will be highlighted.Sita Ram Gupta, executive director of Bharatpur-based Lupin Foundation, which is organising the camp, said that the exhibitions on beekeeping, manufacturing of ‘tulsi mala’ and fashion designing would be held during the event. Students of agricultural and veterinary colleges and researchers are also expected to participate in the camp.last_img read more