Autopsy Jerry Brown Was Sober When Killed in Car

Jerry Brown had consumed well below the Texas legal limit of alcohol when he died last month in a car driven by Dallas Cowboys teammate Josh Brent, according to an autopsy report.Neither Brown, a practice squad player, not Brent, the team’s starting defensive tackle, wore seat belts in the one-car accident on December 8. Brown’s blood-alcohol content was determined to be 0.0056 – nowhere near the limit of 0.08.Meanwhile, Brent’s blood-alcohol content was 0.18, which is more than twice the legal limit at the time of the accident. He has been charged with intoxication manslaughter and freed on $100,000 bond.The Dallas County Medical Examiner’s Office reported in its autopsy Thursday that Brown died of head and neck trauma when their vehicle overturned. He had a dislocated neck and a severely bruised spine. Brent apparently was unharmed and was seen pulling his friend from the wreckage when police arrived.Brent, who has been emotionally distraught since the accident, according to his lawyers, has received support from Brown’s family and even attended a memorial service for the deceased player at the behest of Brown’s mother.The Cowboys have supported Brent and encouraged him to attend a game last month. He was on the sideline for more than half of Dallas’ comeback victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers two weeks after the accident. When he learned his presence there caused somewhat of a commotion, Brent left the stadium. Coach Jason Garrett and owner Jerry Jones said they were unaware that Brent would be present at the game.A few days later, the team and league forbade him from attending any more Cowboys games. read more

14 kids die of Encephalitis in Bihars Muzaffarpur

first_imgIndian medical staff attend to a child admitted in the Encephalitis ward at The Baba Raghav Das Hospital in Gorakhpur, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, on August 12, 2017.SANJAY KANOJIA/AFP/Getty Images [Representational Image]Nearly 14 children are reported to have died in Muzaffarpur district of Bihar due to suspected Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) and Japanese Encephalitis (JE).According to the reports, five children have died in the past 24 hours due to the infection and over a dozen, kids are being treated at Shri Krishna Memorial College Hospital (SKMCH) and Kejriwal Hospital after showing various symptoms of Encephalitis, including high fever and unconsciousness.At least 21 children were admitted at Shri Krishna Memorial College Hospital and 14 were admitted at Kejriwal Hospital on Friday. The Superintendent of SKMCH Sunil Shahi said that the hospital has received a total of 38 patients so far and most of them have glucose deficiency in their blood.District Civil Surgeon SP Singh said that two of the children who died last week has been confirmed of Acute Encephalitis Syndrome. The death of the rest is unknown as of now but the authorities are investigating the incident.Singh said that most of the patients suspected of the infection were brought to the hospital with high fever and Hypoglycemia (a condition caused by a very low level of blood sugar (glucose), the body’s main energy source).”All primary health centres in the district have been put on high alert. But the people need to be cautious about their children as well. Give them as much liquid as you can and keep them hydrated,” he added, reports PTI.Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) is a serious health problem in India. It can be identified by the starting of high fever and clinical neurological manifestation that includes mental confusion, disorientation, delirium or coma. The infection commonly affects children and young adults and can lead to considerable morbidity and mortality.According to the National Health Portal of India, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) is the major cause of AES in India (ranging from 5%-35%). Herpes simplex virus, Influenza A virus, West Nile virus, Chandipura virus, mumps, measles, dengue, Parvovirus B4, enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus and scrub typhus, S.pneumoniae are the other causes of AES in sporadic and outbreak form in India. Nipah virus, Zika virus are also found as causative agents for AES. The etiology in a large number of AES cases still remains unidentified.last_img read more

RBL Bank acquires 10 stake in Utkarsh Micro Finance shares rise

first_imgPrivate-sector lender RBL Bank on Monday announced acquisition of a 9.99% stake in Utkarsh Micro Finance Ltd (UMFL). The acquisition is seen as a strategic move to reach out to the unbanked and underbanked segments of the society.The bank is also entering into an MoU to extend its product portfolio to Utkarsh customers. In a statement, the bank said it has got all the necessary regulatory approvals. UMFL has received in-principle approval from the RBI for setting up a small finance bank and is expected to commence operations soon.”This is a strategic partnership rather than a mere acquisition of a minority stake in Utkarsh, one of India’s finest and well-governed micro finance institutions. Personally, I am very happy and excited to be a part of this partnership. It will help us extend our distribution footprint and strengthen our financial inclusion initiatives across the rural hinterland,” Vishwavir Ahuja, RBL Bank Managing Director and CEO, said in the statement.In other news, RBL Bank said it has raised Rs 330 crore (about $50 million) from CDC Group Plc, a UK-based development finance institution, through Basel III compliant Tier II capital. The capital infusion will help the bank expand to new regions in India.The fund-raising will also strengthen its capital base to meet future requirements. This is the third round of funding the private-sector lender received in two-and-a-half years. Previously, in October 2015, the bank raised Rs 44.5 crore, and in March 2014, it secured investment of Rs 174 crore.RBL Bank stock closed at Rs 297.10 on Monday, up 1.97 from its previous close on the Bombay Stock Exchange.last_img read more

WATCH Trump Pardons Thanksgiving Turkeys Drumstick And Wishbone

first_imgPresident Donald Trump is using his pardon power to keep a pair of turkeys from the Thanksgiving roaster.Trump continued the annual presidential tradition during an event Tuesday in the White House Rose Garden. The act of leniency means 47-pound Drumstick and 36-pound Wishbone will instead get to live the rest of their lives at a Virginia farm. First lady Melania Trump and son Barron joined the president for the light-hearted ceremony.The White House sought public input to determine which gobbler should be pardoned. Trump says Drumstick was the winner, though both birds usually are given a reprieve.President George H. W. Bush established the annual turkey pardon tradition in 1989 when he spared an unnamed, 50-pound turkey.Trump was headed to his Florida estate later Tuesday for Thanksgiving. Sharelast_img read more

The choice of mind

first_imgUnseen Passages, an art show that exhibits the works from the studios of two young and discerning women is on in the Capital that started off on 13 October. Delhi based artist Pallavi Singh’s series Desire to be Desired explores her observations of male vanity and the conditions that feed it. Punctuating the generation of the millennial is easier and faster access to information resulting in renewed socialisation and an increased interest in one’s self-image. Singh breaks away from the stereotype by focusing on the urban male to whom fashion and grooming are an important norm. A middle–aged potbellied bald man is her choice of protagonist, comically represented fussing over his physical appearance. The comment is intended to be both realistic and ironic, with Singh ensuring that the viewer steps aside from the work wearing a smile. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Soghra Khurasani’s from Baroda work is about freedom of thought and draws from a deep angst against unjust social and religious prescriptions. Her large-scale prints are compositions dominated by red: a colour that she feels expresses her rage and despair at the redundant injunctions imposed on common people. By morphing cells of blood into roses through valleys and volcanoes, her art posits the bittersweet moments. Khurasani’s current series Silent Landscapes reveals a resistance to violence and the telling impact of its trauma in rows, swirls and circles that inform the viewer of a never-ending cycle of repression and defiance.last_img read more

29 injured as huge explosion rocks Egypt

first_imgAt least 29 people, including six policemen, were injured when group linked to the dreaded Islamic State millitants carried out a powerful car bomb attack near a key police building in the Egyptian capital, officials said on Thursday.The powerful blast rocked the popular Shubra el-Kheima neighbourhood in northern Shubra district in the middle of the night.Most of the injured suffered minor injuries, a doctor told the state news agency. The explosion was caused by a car bomb and was heard by many people from different areas in Cairo and Giza. The interior ministry said in a statement that a car exploded after it’s driver suddenly stopped in front of the state security building, exited the car and fled on a motorbike that was following the car. The explosion caused a huge damage to the facade of the security building and at least 20 buildings and vehicles in the surrounding area.About 25 ambulances and security forces rushed to the place of the explosion as  reported by the Egyptian TV. The Sinai Province, an Islamic State affiliate group in Egypt claimed responsibility for the attack, according to media reports. The militant group has regularly attacked security forces since the army ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in 2013.last_img read more

Ralph Baer VideoGame Pioneer Dies at 92

first_img Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 2 min read Ralph H. Baer, the creator of the Magnavox Odyssey (known as the “Brown Box”), the first commercial console for home video games, died at the age of 92 on Saturday.A pioneer in the now $93 billion gaming industry, it’s likely you’ve played with the games and systems Baer invented or influenced. In addition to building the first light gun — a gun-shaped controller that allows users to shoot objects on screen — he created the forerunner to Atari’s Pong game as well as the colorful electronic memory game Simon, which made its debut in 1978 at Studio 54 and continues to be sold today.Related: Across the U.S., Bars Are Letting You Play Your Favorite Childhood Video GamesIn 1971, while employed at Sanders Associates, a defense contractor in Nashua, N.H., Baer filed for the first ever video-game patent. His papers are now housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and he was awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation in 2006.So, what can entrepreneurs learn from Baer’s legacy? The biggest takeaway is this: he never stopped inventing. And, as is the case with the best entrepreneurs, his work has inspired generations of new innovators, with a promise of more to come.Related: Can Video Games in the Office Make Employees More Productive?center_img December 8, 2014 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more

What scares travellers CWTs fear factor survey goes worldwide

first_img AMSTERDAM — New research by Carlson Wagonlit Travel found that while more than one-third (37%) of European travellers are concerned about safety and security, their counterparts from other regions worry more: travellers from the Americas including Canada express that nearly half (47%) of the time they worry about safety and security, while Asia Pacific travellers worry the most (56%).“Despite recent terrorist attacks, business travellers say they’re more worried about other things – and that’s surprising,” said Simon Nowroz, Carlson Wagonlit Travel’s chief marketing officer. “We found that, yes, the world seems scarier at times – but travellers believe they have more tools at their disposal to keep them informed and safe.”Terrorism ranks fifth (35%) among safety concerns, despite the high visibility of terrorist attacks. “Forgetting something needed for work” ranked higher (40%), as did “losing something important” (38%), “being robbed or attacked” (37%) and even “weather conditions” (37%).More news:  TRAVELSAVERS welcomes Julie Virgilio to the teamThe CWT Connected Traveler survey of more than 1,900 individuals found that two-thirds (67%) of business travellers believe travel is safer today than in the past as they have more tools to mitigate safety concerns. Seven out of 10 travellers use at least one of their employer’s security protocols, such as traveler tracking or emergency contact profiles. And more than two-thirds (68%) buy travel insurance.One in five travellers said they have cancelled a trip due to concerns about their safety and security. And close to one-third (30%) say they’re worried about their health and wellbeing when it comes to travelling.Only 7% of Asia Pacific (APAC) travellers said they were “not concerned” about personal safety while traveling for business. That percentage rose to 12% for Americas travellers and 21% among Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) travellers. APAC travellers appear to be better prepared; according to the study, more than half (52%) of APAC travelers maintain an up-to-date emergency contact profile compared to 38% in the Americas and only 34% in EMEA.More news:  Canada raises travel warning amid escalating protests in Hong KongAPAC travellers are also more likely to sign up for notifications of real-time risks (41%). Only 33% do in the Americas, while only 29% do from EMEA.“Today’s travellers are sophisticated,” said Nowroz. “They’re signing up for alerts, they’re paying attention to the news and they use the available tools at their disposal. So while travel may seem risky, they’re taking steps to stay safe.” Share What scares travellers? CWT’s fear factor survey goes worldwide << Previous PostNext Post >> Posted bycenter_img Tags: Carlson Wagonlit Travel, Trend Watch Tuesday, October 31, 2017 Travelweek Group last_img read more