Science Is Nothing Without Integrity, cont.

first_img(Visited 334 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 This entry continues yesterday’s news about scientific integrity.Replication CrisisReplication failures in psychology not due to differences in study populations (Nature). Psychologists cannot just blame their replication failures on differences in the study groups. “Half of 28 attempted replications failed even under near-ideal conditions.”Researcher discusses the the science replication crisis (Phys.org). “If there’s a central tenet that unites all of the sciences, it’s probably that scientists should approach discovery without bias and with a healthy dose of skepticism,” this article begins. “The idea is that the best way to reach the truth is to allow the facts to lead where they will, even if it’s not where you intended to go.” Sounds like a great idea. When do they start?The Call for OpennessTime to break academic publishing’s stranglehold on research (New Scientist). Publishers have a vested interest in their power to decide what gets communicated as science. “Science journals are laughing all the way to the bank, locking the results of publicly funded research behind exorbitant paywalls,” this article complains. “A campaign to make content free must succeed.”Scientific impact increases when researchers publish in open access and international collaboration (PLoS One). This journal may have a bias, since it is an open-access publication. One can read it and check their conclusions against the data.No more first authors, no more last authors (Nature). Scientists desire to be first authors, so that their papers can be cited by their names, as in ‘Adams et al.’ Often, too, the last author is the most prestigious one in the group. In the day of increasing collaboration, this practice does more harm than good.Funders flesh out details of Europe’s bold open-access plan (Nature). If Europe’s ‘Plan S’ catches on, it will bring sunshine into science, allowing all the stakeholders – including the public – to see the research. Understandably, the journals behind paywalls stand to lose money big time. This article is fair, but is quick to point out problems the plan might create. See also Science Magazine‘s take on this development.Related SubjectsWhy academia reminds me of my childhood cult (Nature). In its daily briefing, Nature noted a piece in the Washington Post about Andrew Marzoni, who ‘blew off’ a pseudo-Christian cult in his childhood only to find similar methods of mind control in academia. “No one says it aloud, but every graduate student knows: This is the price you pay for a chance to enter the sanctum of the tenure track. Follow the leader, or prepare to teach high school.”Should All Nobel Prizes Be Canceled for a Year? (Live Science). Prizes are shiny objects the media loves, but they take eyes off of what science should be about: a search for truth. The quest for a prize can corrupt motives, and prizes often leave out worthy individuals. Since the rules only allow three winners per category, group discoveries suffer. And what about the other sciences that the Nobel Committee left out? Why should a few political leftists in Sweden be the determiners of who has made a “worthy” discovery? These are a few reasons to ask whether Nobel Prizes should not just be canceled for a year, but forever.The Moral Machine Experiment (Nature). Researchers in this paper claim to have made progress in defining morality policies for artificial intelligence, particularly moral dilemmas that autonomous vehicles will face. Obviously, “moral” cannot be defined by the scientific method. These authors truck their assumptions about morality into their work.Scientists struggle with confusing journal guidelines (Nature). Even if a scientist wants to do the right thing, how can he or she know what it is? This is especially a problem for researchers who do not speak English.To dispel myths, redirect the belief, study says (Medical Xpress). The very title of this article should raise red flags. Who granted scientists the right to decide how to change other people’s beliefs, especially when they have issues of integrity and fake science themselves? Falling for bad scientific ideas is undoubtedly a problem for many people lacking discernment, but when scientists become arbiters of effective methods for changing people, their methods could feed dictatorial regimes who want to enforce conformity.Science knowledge shifted along religious, political affiliations (Phys.org). Two social scientists at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln find that biases are hard to eradicate from research. Another sociologist says, “”Scientists hope that science is apolitical,” she said. “But we take in and code information based on our perspectives – including political ideology and religious beliefs.”First law of leadership: be human first, scientist second (Nature). Alison Antes gives social advice to researchers about building relationships in the lab. But to an evolutionist, what does it mean to “be human” if not to use cutthroat tactics for survival? She borrows Christian ethics, like “model desired behavior,” without attribution to the Apostle Paul, who said, “What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me—practice these things” (Philippians 4:9). Her article does illustrate, however, that science is done by humans who need to build character.Rogue science strikes again: the case of the first gene-edited babies (G. Owen Schaefer, The Conversation). The media are abuzz with ethical judgments about a Chinese researcher’s claim to have edit the genes of two baby girls. Boardman and O’Neill, one a geneticist and the other a social scientist, weigh in on the subject in another piece on The Conversation. The development opens up a huge can of worms, all admit, and many say further research of this type should be outlawed.Shock greets claim of CRISPR-edited babies (Science Magazine).Can scientists use gene editing for disease prevention but not human enhancement? (Phys.org).Editorial: The (somewhat obvious) ethical problems with creating gene-edited babies (The Times Editorial Board via Phys.org)Notice that science cannot be neutral here. Science “can” do things that it “should not” do. Read Wesley J. Smith’s comments on this development at Evolution News.One thing Big Science needs to do is get out of politics. We have collected a large number of new examples of political bias in scientific papers and articles that we will be sharing soon. Today’s entry provides foundation for questioning Big Science’s ability to be unbiased.Scientist, research thyself.Recommended Resource: J. P. Moreland’s new book Scientism and Secularism: Learning to Respond to a Dangerous Ideology puts into print many of Moreland’s ideas on philosophy of science (his PhD specialization), extending them since his 1999 book Christianity and the Nature of Science. Hear an interview about the book on ID the Future. He defines scientism, and shows three major reasons it is indefensible as a philosophy or way of knowing. When interviewer Michael Keas (PhD in history of science) says that historians and philosophers need to work together, Moreland gives the following response that is worth sounding throughout the churches of America.We really have to alert the public. Youth leaders, our Christian school teachers, parents that are raising their kids, we need to alert them to the fact that scientism is really at the bottom of the turmoil we’re facing at culture. Barna did a study recently and found that the six reasons that people are leaving Christianity for atheism are all intellectual reasons, and a couple of them deal with the inability of the church to help believers know how to relate their theology and their Biblical beliefs to science – and science trumps! And so we have retreated to “faith,” and the culture has become morally relativistic because the major things about religion and politics and ethics can’t be known scientifically. So what scientism has done is funded relativism in culture and blind faith commitments in Christianity. And that isn’t sustaining people when they get out of our youth groups and go to college or go into the workforce and meet thoughtful, intelligent unbelievers who will say things like, “Well, prove it– you can’t prove Christianity scientifically, so I don’t have to listen to you.” They don’t know what to say. And so my book is an attempt to do what you’re calling us to do, and that is to work together with our Christian leaders and parents to give them a tool they can learn about themselves and teach our kids and inoculate them responsibly so that they’re not sucked into a culture of scientism.When you tie these thoughts into what you have just read above in Nature and Science about Big Science’s own admissions of bias and unreliability, we should ask: why should anyone bow to the false idol of scientism? Integrity is the foundation of trust for any claim by any person in any field, not appeal to some “method” that scientists self-righteously assert protects them from error.How leading experts can be fooled.Another helpful resource is Jerry Bergman’s recent book Evolution’s Blunders, Frauds and Forgeries (2017). When you learn about how leading scientists fell for fraudulent claims in the past (like Piltdown Man and much more), you begin to realize that scientists are just as prone to error as anyone, especially when their Darwinian ideology motivates their research.[What Piltdown hoaxes are floating about these days, to be exposed some future day? We can suggest several candidates.]last_img read more

Riders saving lives in Lesotho

first_imgThe Lesotho branch of Riders for Health operates in some of the most rugged terrain in Africa. (Image: Riders for Health) MEDIA CONTACTS • Matthew HannCommunications, Riders for Health+44 1604 889 570RELATED ARTICLES • Garden of Hope for HIV/Aids• Bold new HIV/Aids plan for SA • Lennox sings for HIV/Aids • Ridding Africa of HIV in ten yearsJanine ErasmusRiders for Health, the motorbike-based charity arm of the MotoGP racing championship, is inviting its supporters to take part in an inspirational ride through Lesotho, where they will help raise funds for the organisation and experience its work first-hand.Experience Africa is touted as “an adventure for the heart and mind”. It was launched at the International Motorcycle and Scooter Show in November 2009 by Riders co-founder and multiple MotoGP champion Randy Mamola, and takes to the road in October 2010.The eight-day trip can accommodate a limited number of riders. Details are expected imminently, and interested off-road biking fanatics are encouraged to email experienceafrica@riders.org to make sure they don’t miss out on any announcements.Mamola has already ridden the route, which encompasses some of the famous Roof of Africa rally’s roads, and confessed to being overwhelmed by the experience.“I have had the most incredible 10 days riding in the wonderful country of Lesotho,” he said at the launch. “The Riders for Health Experience Africa ride is sure to be a life-changing experience.”The NGO’s country director Mahali Hlasa, the Riders’ first female trainer, will chaperone the adventuresome group.Experience Africa participants, who pay £5 000 (R58 819) upfront, are assured that £2 000 (R23 525) of that sum will go directly to the Riders initiative. Flights, accommodation, motorbikes, meals, and mechanical and medical support are covered by the remainder. A valid motorbike licence is a prerequisite.They will ride through the mountainous country to raise funds and awareness of the organisation’s ongoing work, and will also be able to get a personal glimpse into the outreach projects already underway.They can expect to interact with health workers in the country, riding with them to isolated areas and experiencing how reliable transport has transformed their jobs. They will also visit clinics and communities and see how the treatment of HIV/Aids and tuberculosis is accelerating because of increased accessibility to medicines and education.Riding to save livesRiders for Health is the official charity of the Grand Prix motorbike championship, or MotoGP. The organisation operates in Gambia, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania and Lesotho, with projects completed in Ghana, Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda. Its patron is HRH The Princess Royal.Lesotho is in particularly dire need of the Riders’ assistance. The tiny kingdom lies among the soaring peaks of the Drakensberg and Maluti mountains, and this harsh terrain is often difficult to navigate with conventional vehicles. Even those with four-wheel drives can struggle.Lesotho is the only country on earth whose entire altitude lies over 1 000m above sea level. Its lowest point is at the junction of the Orange and Makhaleng Rivers at 1 400m, and its highest is the Thabana Ntlenyana peak at 3 482m. More than 80% of the country lies higher than 1 800m.The kingdom has been hard hit by the global HIV/Aids epidemic. About 25% of the adult population is thought to be HIV-positive, according to international Aids charity Avert.This is where the Riders’ work is so crucial. People living in more remote areas have to make their own way to reach basic facilities such as shops and clinics – sometimes trudging for hours and in freezing temperatures.Using motorbikes to navigate tricky terrain, Riders for Health brings care to communities that otherwise might have no help at all. Working hand in hand with the Ministry of Health and related bodies, the organisation enables health workers to easily reach their patients, and also transports medical samples to laboratories for testing and diagnosis.Mobilising the biker communityThe organisation was born out of the concern and interest of a group of people working on the MotoGP circuit in the 1980s. Some of them, including Mamola, visited Lesotho in the late 1980s and were dismayed to see the many broken-down cars that could not be fixed because of lack of expertise.The group decided to take action by developing innovative ways of managing vehicles in difficult conditions, and at the same time began mobilising support for a new transport initiative that would minimise the toll taken by rough terrain on less hardy vehicles.The international motorbike community responded enthusiastically and continues to give prominence to the scheme at events such as the British Grand Prix and the annual Riders/MotoGP Day of Champions.The first national programme was run in Lesotho in 1991, followed three years later by another in Zimbabwe. The organisation is based in the UK but has branches in a number of European countries as well.last_img read more

The Small Business Handbook gives guidance to aspiring entrepreneurs

first_imgAn international businesswoman, consultant and mentor, Nokwazi Mzobe is playing her part and sharing her deep experience with current and aspiring South African entrepreneurs in her new book, The Small Business Handbook.Already established in the world of global entrepreneurship, consultant and business mentor Nokwazi Mzobe is sharing her knowledge and expertise with South Africa’s new generation of aspiring businesspeople. (Image supplied)Mathiba MolefeBusinesswoman Nokwazi Mzobe is sharing her wealth of international experience with the new crop of ambitious South African entrepreneurs in her new book, The Small Business Handbook.The guide was launched earlier this month at Nu Metro Cinemas in Hyde Park, drawing a range of high-profile guests. Minister of Home Affairs Hlengiwe Mkhize gave the keynote address, with the backing of MCs Anele Mkuzo-Magape and Gugu Nkabinde.“Looking back on my adventure as an entrepreneur, I always wished there was a single, accessible source in which to find the answers to my questions or solve problems, or at least point me in the right direction,” Mzobe says.“That’s the inspiration behind The Small Business Handbook.”Before Mzobe started Matoyana, her consulting agency, she spent eight years at two Fortune 500 multinational companies operating throughout Africa and the Middle East, where she developed and honed her business skills.Mzobe then decided to take a year off to do her MBA, focusing on entrepreneurship and innovation.This inspired her to establish Matoyana, which allows her to follow her passion for consulting and mentorship services. Her consultancy work enables other entrepreneurs to run successful, sustainable businesses, helping promote a culture of entrepreneurship and innovative thinking in the South African business community.Mzobe says her book is far from being a typical business publication. It is more of a guide, covering 17 critical business-related topics. These include the role of social media in business as well as finance and best practices. She says the book is easy to understand and can be referenced on a daily basis to provide inspiration and practical advice.Beyond just businessMzobe’s willingness to improve people’s lives goes further than just the world of business.Among a number of other endeavours, she has set in motions plans to partner with a local NGO to develop and maintain urban gardens.She says her biggest wish is to improve education in South Africa. Mzobe’s mantra is a quote from media mogul Ellis Watson: “Just be obsessed about being brilliant and the money will come by default rather than by design.”The Small Business HandbookMzobe says her book is far from being a typical business publication. It is more of a guide, covering 17 critical business-related topics.The Small Business Handbook is a tool business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs can refer to for ideas on how to address issues in their businesses. Other topics covered include how to create an ethical business environment, and understanding different revenue strategies.The book is available online through the Matoyana website. Visit their Facebook and Instagram pages for more information.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Can an Urban River Be Restored?

first_imgFlooding potential will be limited to a few placesBecause of the river’s densely developed flood plain, it will only be allowed out of its straitjacket in a few places to flood again. I walked by one of those sites — a 42-acre Union Pacific Railroad property called Taylor Yard. The city is negotiating to buy the land, and one day the river could resume a semblance of its natural rhythm there, according to Erin Jones, an Army Corps biologist.“They’ll bring the site down to the same grade as the river,” says Jones. “The river will be allowed to meander and create new habitat — marshland, riffles, and pools. It’s one of the larger sites where we can actually do restoration to more natural habitats and natural hydrology.” After serving as a rail yard for decades, the site will likely need hazardous waste cleanup first, Jones says.Parker says she would love to see more of the river’s concrete removed and banks covered with native vegetation. This would provide significantly more ecosystem function, such as wildlife habitat, natural water cleaning, carbon sequestration, and nutrient recycling.Other cities are doing more complete “living river” restoration. The city of Napa, California, for example, has a history of devastating floods. But in the Napa Valley — where some land sells for $300,000 an acre — some vineyards are pitching in as part of an effort to help return a 4.5-mile stretch of the floodplain to its natural condition. This includes restoring oxbows and marshes so that floodwaters can be absorbed naturally during spates, rather than flooding the city of Napa.The Glendale Narrows won’t be the end of the L.A. River restoration. A group of government and non-profit groups are meeting to see how the lower 20 miles of river might be restored. This is a heavily urbanized stretch, running largely through low-income Latino neighborhoods, with just 3% consisting of parks, farms, or other open space. Remarkably, though, some small patches of wetlands there remain intact. Any work on this stretch is at least a decade off.No matter how the Los Angeles River is restored, thinking about the river differently and embracing its presence — rather than dismissing it as a drainage ditch — is a teachable moment for Southern California. Even a partially restored river will provide an escape from Los Angeles’ overwhelming urbanism and will perform some important ecological functions.“There’s something magical about coming to a place and seeing so many varieties of life,” says Parker. “The river provides that.” RELATED ARTICLES Undamming Rivers Could Make Room for PVThe Uncertain Future of Phoenix and Las VegasCalifornia’s Real Water CrisisFloating Solar: A Win-Win for Drought-Stricken LakesHow Much Water Does it Take to Turn on a Light Bulb?The 10 Most Important Water Stories in 2014 Now, however, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, partnering with the City of Los Angeles and conservation groups, is poised to launch the largest coordinated restoration effort of the Los Angeles River to date. The Corps recently completed a plan to remove three miles of river-killing concrete and enhance an 11-mile run through the Elysian Valley, a stretch called the Glendale Narrows. The Corps has asked Congress for $380 million to carry out the restoration effort, which will be combined with roughly $1 billion from the city.Congressional funding is expected to be approved soon, helping launch a project that could take two decades or more to complete. But fundamental questions about bringing the L.A. River back to life remain: What, exactly, should this resurrected river be? And just what kind of natural bang will Angelenos and other Americans get for their billion-plus dollars? A new ecosystem type, not a “restoration”But restoring a river that is dynamic and free-flowing remains a far-off, even impossible, dream for many urban areas. Rivers often flood, and while that may be hard on people and the things they build, it’s great for biodiversity. During a flood, mineralized nutrients and organic material are suspended in the river and groundwater, nourishing an array of biodiversity. And flooding continually creates a patchwork of diverse habitats, also promoting species diversity.Questions about what the Los Angeles River could become may find answers in the Glendale Narrows, where some elements of naturalness will be reintroduced.This is what the proposed restoration of wetlands would look like at the junction of the L.A. River and the Verdugo Wash waterway. [Photo credit: City of Los Angeles.]“It’s a new ecosystem type,” says Parker. “That’s why we don’t call it restoration. We call it habitat enhancement.” The Corps plan would recreate 719 acres of wetlands, remove three miles of concrete to create new riparian habitat, and re-establish a confluence with a stream called Verdugo Wash.On a recent walk along the “river” in the Glendale Narrows, it became clear how oddly unnatural it really is. Unlike the original L.A. River, today’s river now has substantial year-round flow, thanks to a water treatment plant that recycles sewage outflow from 800,000 homes in the San Fernando Valley and releases 23 million gallons a day into the channel. Torrents in the rainy season wash tainted urban runoff into the stream.This 11-mile stretch is one of the only places that defied the Army Corps’ Depression-era efforts at control. The bottom of the river was so soft that the concrete would not stick. As a result, this section of river is a purling, cobble- and rock-studded waterway with swimming mallards, blue herons, and cormorants atop boulders drying their outstretched wings. Both banks, though, form a massive concrete trough.Still, nature finds a way. It turns out that water sheeting over the concrete grows algae that are an important foraging habitat for shorebirds. Indeed, on the day I visited, a black-necked stilt was working these hard bottom shallows. Bird habitat is a prime objectiveWithin this 11-mile section is a 2.5-mile stretch where the Nature Conservancy, in collaboration with the Army Corps and the local community, will begin its work in the next couple of years. The Nature Conservancy has created a baseline of ecological conditions to measure the changes its work might bring, and the group is growing native plants needed for restoration in Griffiths Park.Historical ecology — the study of old photos, maps, and diary accounts — will provide a sense of what the river once looked like, including the wildlife and plant species present. This will help guide restoration. “It gives you a sense of options for the future,” Parker says.One major element of the Nature Conservancy project is the restoration of bird habitat. At one time, the Los Angeles River was characterized by perennial and seasonal wetlands, seeps, springs, swamps, riparian forests, and mud and alkali flats. “The reason L.A. was founded where it was is because it was an ecologically rich area,” Parker says. “There were grizzly bears, deer, mountain lions, and a lot of birds.”More than 300 species of birds still visit what’s left of the river, flying between fragments of habitat.Two endangered species, the Southwestern willow flycatcher and the least Bell’s vireo, will benefit from the removal of a towering invasive plant from Asia known as giant reed (Arundo donax). It has taken over much of the riverbanks, and birds can’t nest in it. The arundo will be replaced with native plants, including several species of willow, sedge, and wild rye.“This is one of the places where birds can make a comeback,” says Parker. “You need a bundle of different habitats.”As habitat improves, the Nature Conservancy may consider reintroducing native amphibian or fish species that have disappeared. But there are some ecological functions that a revitalized L.A. River simply won’t be able to accommodate. The steelhead that once spawned here, for example, won’t be swimming up from the ocean at the mouth of the river at Long Beach anytime soon. Though they are endangered and badly in need of reproduction, the temperature of the water is too warm, and there are too many barriers.center_img Jim Robbins is a journalist based in Helena, Montana, who has written for a number of publications. This post was originally published at Yale environment 360. Complete restoration is not possibleThis will not be the original L.A. River; trying to restore some semblance of naturalness to such a waterway faces major limitations. The river is no longer connected to groundwater and can’t be until toxic waste from a number of U.S. Defense Department facilities in the region — including the Santa Susana Field Station, a former rocket engine test center — are cleaned up. And the many places a living Los Angeles River would go, flooding and changing course, are now filled with roads, houses, and commercial buildings.“We’re not going to be able to buy up or relocate people,” says Jill Sourial, the Nature Conservancy’s urban conservation director in Los Angeles.With full restoration out of the picture, a different tangle of philosophical and practical questions remain. How far do you go to create a natural environment in a city? Is it enough just to make a concrete drainage ditch prettier? How much of the project should focus on removing concrete and creating some semblance of a functioning riverine ecosystem? And in a city with an estimated 47,000 homeless people (including many who live on islands in the L.A. River), gang problems, and a range of environmental threats — from wildfires to toxic waste sites — is the expense of $100 million per river-mile a wise use of taxpayer dollars?Los Angeles is far from the only place addressing these kinds of issues. Many urban areas in the U.S. and around the world have realized that returning at least some nature to cities is vital, whether for green infrastructure that handles storm runoff, making cities cooler with trees and green space as the climate warms, or simply because more and more people live in urban areas and increasingly want more nature in their lives.Seoul, the South Korean capital, answered the call of nature in 2005 by finishing the removal of a major highway from atop a three-mile stream called the Cheonggyecheon, which flows through the heart of the city. Europe’s Isar River — which flows from the Austrian Alps and through Munich, Germany, and has many similarities to the L. A. River — has had some five miles of similarly channeled river “naturalized”; the Isar now is a major attraction in Munich and is one of the leading models for Southern California’s restoration efforts.In the U.S., the three rivers that flow through Milwaukee and into Lake Michigan — the Milwaukee, Menomonee, and Kinnickinnic — are being revitalized. And sliver by green sliver, pieces of New York City’s Bronx River — once one of the most blighted waterways in the country — are coming back. By JIM ROBBINSIn its natural state, before it was channeled and lined with concrete, the 51-mile-long Los Angeles River was often little more than a trickle for nine months of the year. During the rainy season, however, the small braided stream would turn into a powerful, churning river. It behaved like a dropped firehose, wildly lashing the Los Angeles valley, scouring gravel and soil across a seven-mile-wide floodplain, and carving a new course with every deluge. When the waters receded, a mosaic of fertile marshes, ponds, and other wetlands remained.“It was a big, flashy, dynamic river system,” says Sophie Parker, a biologist with the Nature Conservancy.But such flash flooding wouldn’t do for a booming city, so in 1938, after a devastating torrent, a project to tame the Los Angeles River with a concrete straitjacket got underway. Since then, nearly the entire river has been funneled through a hard channel that allows no flooding. The city turned its back on the ditch, and public access to it was prohibited.Over the past several decades, conservation organizations and neighborhood groups in the United States’ second-largest city have worked to recreate some semblance of nature along the waterway. Collaborating with city officials, these organizations have restored some small creeks and planted native trees and shrubs in new parks. But the work has been done piecemeal.last_img read more

10 Must-Read Video Editing Articles

first_imgKeeping an eye on the industry and staying refreshed is a great way to improve your video editing game. These must-read video editing articles have something helpful for pros and amateurs alike.Film and video professionals should constantly be devouring movies, commercials, music videos, books, and articles. They should be looking ahead at trends in the medium and looking back at where the medium has been. Media consumption is an important aspect of maintaining a flow of inspiration for your own work. With that in mind, here’s a collection of ten must-read articles for our readers living the video editing life.1. Designing Lower Thirds Like a ProFor video editors who find themselves working on a project that involves generating lower thirds graphics, here’s an article from Shutterstock that covers the basics. The article also covers color selection and typography and how those things impact the message you’re trying to convey. This is a great refresher for pro video editors and a great intro to lower thirds for new editors.2. Professional Video Editing Tips and TechniquesPremiumBeat’s very own Caleb Ward crafted this all-inclusive mega-article about video editing tips and techniques. This article covers just about every professional tip or technique you need to know as a video editor, starting with picking the right software and hardware. It also touches on editing for story, editing language, editing speed, shortcuts, and distribution. By the end of the article, you should have a basic understanding of video editing.3. Common Mistakes That Amateur Editors MakeOver at RocketStock, professional cinematographer, director, and editor Noam Kroll offers a list of common editing mistakes that rookie editors are prone to making in their earliest projects. Heed his advice and avoid the traps associated with cutting too little, overusing transitions, always opening with the master, and editing for dialogue.4. Video Editing Tricks to Increase Your Editing SpeedIncreasing your video editing speed sounds like a great thing — but it’s only great if the work being produced is still high-quality. Mike Wilkinson over at FStoppers knows this all too well. That’s why he wrote this great article that gives readers five tricks for better edits. Some of the tricks he covers: knowing how to use a J cut, cleaning up dialogue, using natural segues, and even adding markers. These tips aren’t mind blowing, but they are essential techniques for anyone wanting to increase their editing speed without losing  quality.5. 10 Video Editing Tips From TEDThis piece from the fine folks of TED gives you a real understanding of how to piece a narrative together. The article takes you step by step through the cutting process and features some great video examples from different TED Talks as a guide. While this breakdown is geared more toward the editing of a TED Talk, there are plenty of basic editing technique examples for video editors.6. Editing Techniques to Make Scenes More DramaticDoes the phrase “dramatic sync tempo decompression” mean anything to you? If not, you’ll find this No Film School article very eye-opening. Read along as Robert Hardy highlights the editing techniques of documentary editor Paddy Bird. 7. Editors Who Broke the SystemPremiumBeat author Michael Maher wrote a great piece on the pioneering female editors who broke the Hollywood system. Their influence is undeniable and their stories are great sources of inspiration for anyone in the world of film and video editing.8. Video Editing OrganizationWe’ve listed plenty of sources for video editing tips and techniques… but what about organization? Staying organized is paramount for video editors. With that in mind, here’s a great Videomaker article from Chris Gates that goes over five essential tips to help video editors stay organized and effective. 9. Improving Your Editing TechniquesLarry Jordan has been offering advice to filmmakers and video editors for years. In this piece, Jordan gives us a solid overview of professional editing techniques. Do yourself a favor and explore all of the embedded links within the article. There’s lots of good stuff in there.10. Steps to Becoming a Hollywood EditorRobert Lanford is a Los Angeles-based editor who has worked on major television shows like The Goldbergs, Decoded, and The Good Wife. In this blog post, Lanford goes over the steps an up-and-coming editor needs to take in order to make it as an editor in Hollywood.Did we miss anything? Seen any good video editing articles lately? Share them in the comments below.last_img read more