Tests reveal increase in COVID-19 clusters in Jakarta’s houses of worship

first_imgTopics : During its transition from large-scale social restrictions (PSBB), the capital determined five types of COVID-19 clusters, namely houses of worship, residential areas, markets, office and health facilities.Governor Anies Baswedan extended the transitional PSBB for another two weeks starting on Friday after Jakarta failed to slow down the daily increase in COVID-19 cases. The capital’s positivity rate hit 6.5 percent in the past week, above the figure recommended by the World Health Organization for relaxations, which is 5 percent or below.The city’s latest COVID-19 daily reproduction number (Rt) also stood at 1. An outbreak is considered under control if the number is below 1. (aly) More than half of the people tested for COVID-19 at houses of worship were found to have the disease, health authorities have revealed.According to epidemiologist Dewi Nur Aisyah of the national COVID-19 task force, the positivity rate in houses of worship has reached 74 percent, up from 51 percent, tempo.co reported.The positivity rate refers to the percentage of positive results of from all tests conducted in a cluster.center_img Jakarta Health Agency data from June 4 to July 28 shows there were 114 confirmed cases from nine houses of worship clusters across the capital. Most of them were located in churches and mosques, with three clusters each and a total of 40 cases.Meanwhile, health authorities recorded one cluster in a clergy dormitory, pesantren [Islamic boarding school] and tahlil (Islamic prayers of the dead), with a total of 74 cases.Read also: Religious Affairs Ministry issues protocol for reopening houses of worship“The positivity rate likely [increased] because people kept gathering in one place, such as in a clergy dormitory,” Dewi said on Friday as quoted by tempo.co.last_img read more

Gender Dysphoria and Children: An Endocrinologist’s Evaluation of I am Jazz

first_imgPublic Discourse 5 April 2018Family First Comment: An important analysis….“I Am Jazz contains a large number of glaring and very troubling omissions.Omission #1: The authors fail to mention that Jazz suffers from depression.Omission #2: The suicide rate of transgender individuals is alarmingly highOmission #3: Jazz is currently being given hormone blockers to stop him from going through normal pubertal development. These powerful hormones arrest the normal development of boys into fully developed men and of girls into fully developed women. In other words, Jazz is now a teenager who has not been allowed to go through puberty.Omission #4: Jazz will need to have his child-sized penis surgically destroyed to create a false vagina.Omission #5: Jazz currently suffers from sexual dysfunction and will likely have permanent damage.Omission #6: Jazz will very likely be rendered permanently infertile.Omission #7: There is a high level of substance abuse among people who identify as transgender.Omission #8: There are a number of serious health risks associated with taking cross-sex hormones.Omission #9: The mortality rate of those who identify as transgender is three times higher than that of the general population.”Recently, a group of parents asked me to review the book I Am Jazz to determine whether, from a medical point of view, it is suitable for children to read. They also asked this for the benefit of their school district, given that the topic of childhood gender dysphoria would be discussed at their upcoming school board meeting. I have read the book I Am Jazz and examined the book’s relationship to childhood gender dysphoria and its implications for adolescence and adulthood. I am a board-certified physician in Rocklin, California specializing in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism. Broadly, endocrinology is the study of hormones and glands and the diagnosis and treatment of diseases involving these hormones and glands. The following essay is a detailed presentation of my findings regarding this important topic.Children with gender dysphoria deserve our compassion and deserve to be treated with dignity and kindness, just like all other children. Their unique condition makes integrating in the school a challenge. Particularly when dealing with bathrooms and locker rooms, it would be advantageous for schools to have a comprehensive policy to address children with gender dysphoria. To some degree, children who share a class with a gender-dysphoric child will need to be educated about what that means and how to address that situation. This should be done by parents and guardians primarily, but ideally in cooperation with teachers and staff.Unfortunately, I Am Jazz actually works against educating children about gender dysphoria.Factual Inaccuracies in I Am JazzInaccuracy #1: About a quarter of the way through I Am Jazz, the author states: “I have a girl brain in a boy body.” Jazz later goes to the doctor and relates: “Afterwards, the doctor spoke to my parents and I heard the word ‘transgender’ for the very first time.”Inaccuracy #2: According to Jazz, “I have a girl brain but a boy body. This is called transgender. I was born this way!”Inaccuracy #3:  Jazz says: “I have a girl brain.”Troubling OmissionsI Am Jazz contains a large number of glaring and very troubling omissions.Omission #1: The authors fail to mention that Jazz suffers from depression. Omission #2: The suicide rate of transgender individuals is alarmingly high Omission #3: Jazz is currently being given hormone blockers to stop him from going through normal pubertal development. These powerful hormones arrest the normal development of boys into fully developed men and of girls into fully developed women. In other words, Jazz is now a teenager who has not been allowed to go through puberty. Omission #4: Jazz will need to have his child-sized penis surgically destroyed to create a false vagina. Omission #5: Jazz currently suffers from sexual dysfunction and will likely have permanent damage. Omission #6: Jazz will very likely be rendered permanently infertile. Omission #7: There is a high level of substance abuse among people who identify as transgender. Omission #8: There are a number of serious health risks associated with taking cross-sex hormones. Omission #9: The mortality rate of those who identify as transgender is three times higher than that of the general population.READ MORE: http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2018/04/21220/?utm_source=The+Witherspoon+Institute&utm_campaign=388c11bc87-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_15ce6af37b-388c11bc87-84094405last_img read more

Tiana Mangakahia and Miranda Drummond’s SU careers potentially end with NCAA tournament upset-loss

first_imgIt hasn’t quite settled yet, but Miranda Drummond and Tiana Mangakahia aren’t blind to the reality. The night before Syracuse’s Round of 32 game, Drummond went over to Managkahia’s apartment to watch Miami women’s basketball play.As the same team that solidified Syracuse’s hosting status — the best achievement of Mangakahia’s time as a member of SU, she said — graced the TV in front of them, the pair who’ve so frequently found themselves beneficiaries of each other, looked ahead.It’s been Syracuse’s mantra for the entire tournament, the entire season: “We really need to get this win tomorrow,” they both repeated to each other. That part was blatant to them. But they both wanted to make it to the Final Four. They fantasized about it last season, and this season’s roster appeared to crystalize the possible reality.It happened the same way its happened whenever the Orange had their best performances: Mangakahia would dish the ball to Drummond, Drummond would take the ball in stride and finish. It’s a deadly combination that’s been rarely slowed. An 8-0 run to push the Orange ahead at the start of the fourth quarter showed the partnership at the pinnacle of its performance. A Mangakahia behind-the-back pass found a cutting Drummond. A steal led the break again where Drummond was the first one to jump as Mangakahia tied the game. Those were the plays the two dreamed about and they lived it as a reality.But, instead, Syracuse fell down seven points. Drummond felt something different. Mangakahia grabbed a rebound off the rim, turned and let out a distressed cry to Drummond. She beckoned Drummond up the court. She begged her to do the thing they’ve always done. But when the ball left Drummond’s hands, the play that worked so often, the shot that connected so often, the trajectory of Syracuse’s runs that the play had so often taken, missed.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It’s a sh*tty feeling,” Mangakahia said. “All of us expected a lot more.”No. 3 Syracuse’s (25-9, 11-5 Atlantic Coast) upset loss in the NCAA tournament Round of 32 spurred the end of the partnership of Tiana Mangakahia and Miranda Drummond. If Mangakahia decides to enter the WNBA draft, Monday’s loss would be the end of the Syracuse careers for both. A group that came in with so much promise looked often to the play of each, who combined for 29 points Monday, and a loss to South Dakota State (28-6, 15-1 Summit) represents a crushing end that many with SU don’t believe either deserves.“We just have that connection,” Drummond said of Mangakahia. “I guess it didn’t work today.”Max Freund | Staff PhotographerMangakahia and Drummond both entered their first year at Syracuse as unknowns. The Orange, in attempting to deal with the loss of program legends then-SU career assist leader Alexis Peterson and dynamic-scorer Brittany Sykes, thrust both into the starting lineup. The results boosted Syracuse and kept it steady. Mangakahia set Syracuse’s single-season assist record and did so while feeding Drummond with dump passes on the perimeter and on cuts to the basket.The two became friends and proven leaders on and off the court. Kadiatou Sissoko, who came to Syracuse this year with little shooting skill, shot with Drummond and Mangakahia after practice almost every day. Mangakahia and Drummond hosted get-togethers where teammates ate dinner and watched movies. For Syracuse football games, Drummond opened her Binghamton home to her teammates.Gabrielle Cooper appreciates the “goofiness” the two bring. Her roommate Drummond is so often a “fun spirit.” When Emily Engstler first attended SU classes over the summer, she was in the same class with Mangakahia. She remembered they couldn’t stop laughing over nothing.  The two became great friends and hung out frequently. They spent nights at Mangakahia’s apartment, walked around campus and laughed some more. Before Engstler had her own car, Drummond used to drive her around SU. Before the season, Syracuse players host a preseason tournament among returners. They asked Engstler to join.Engstler followed with a “roller coaster” season, she said. She used to lean on Drummond and Mangakahia when times were tough. Now, they’re gone.“That’s going to really suck,” Engstler said. “That will suck more than missing them on the basketball court.”Mangakahia’s scared, too. Every player experiences change, Cooper said, but for Mangakahia there’s no choice that she can make to avoid it. Her future is uncertain. Losing and falling short of the goal she and Drummond set, the one they envisioned started Monday doesn’t compare to the abrupt way in which it happened. Now, she’s left with a decision to make — a decision which will leave her with a void either way.More coverage Mental lapses sting Syracuse in season-ending loss to South Dakota StateNo. 3 seed Syracuse falls in historic upset, 74-65, to No. 6 seed South Dakota StateDefensive changes, 3-point shooting, and more fast reactions from Syracuse’s 75-64 loss to South Dakota State Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 26, 2019 at 1:25 am Contact Michael: mmcclear@syr.edu | @MikeJMcClearycenter_img She said if she decides it’s best to leave, she would just want to have one last get-together with the team. She’d invite the team over and they’d hang out and play games. She wouldn’t talk about the game, the final foul, the missed shots, her walk off the court, how her Syracuse record-breaking 591st career assist fell in front of the deaf ear of a crowd that was stunned in the home team’s defeat. No, she just wants one more moment with the group. One more goodbye before each of them go their separate ways.Syracuse has experienced change before. Drummond and Mangakahia were the successors of two of the best guards in SU history and came in with little expectation to meet the mark Peterson and Sykes had previously set. But Monday’s loss brings change a little quicker, before it could even settle for Drummond at the end of the game. A final meeting of the team would signify an uncertain future, a future where Syracuse will be without its dynamic duo, and another chance for the team to start anew. Commentslast_img read more