Showdown for the crown – Hummingbirds, Orchids in Elite decider

first_img Spence will receive support from national players Shanice Beckford and Adean Thomas, along with former national players, Simone Forbes, Althea Byfield and Kimone Tulloch. Meanwhile, the Hummingbirds coach Marvette Anderson, said they will overcome the game two setback and wrap up the series today. “We know where we went wrong and so we are going to fix it on Saturday,’ said Anderson. “It was a bad night for our shooters, but I expect them to come back on Saturday,” she said. The Hummingbirds will look to top shooter Thristina Harwood, who netted 27 goals in the game two defeat. Harwood is expect to receive support from Shameera Sterling, Stacian Facey and Tracey-Ann Robinson. The Alfred Sangster Auditorium at the University of Technology will be buzzing with excitement today when Kingston Hummingbirds and St Ann Orchids clash in the deciding game of the best-of-three finals of the Berger Elite League. The match is set to start at 6 p.m. The Janet Guy-coached Orchids will enter today’s game oozing with confidence after they outclassed the Hummingbirds 58-39 to the level the series on Thursday. The Hummingbirds, who are seeking their second hold on the title, won the opening match 57-43. However, the Orchids, who are aiming to win the title for the first time, are highly favoured to win today’s contest. Guy said her team is highly motivated ahead of today’s contest and so she is expecting an excellent performance from them. “They are going to come strong, but we are coming too, and so we are expecting stiff competition,” said Guy. “We just have to stay on top, score off our centre passes and ensure that we execute for the entire game, and once we do this, then we will win because they are very confident,” she said. The Orchids will be depending heavily on goal shooter Sabrina Spence, who netted 43 goals from 49 attempts in the game two victory over the Hummingbirds. SUPPORTING PLAYERSlast_img read more

Filefish uses ‘smell camouflage’ to hide from predators

first_imgThe harlequin filefish is a master of disguise. The reef-dwelling fish (Oxymonacanthus longirostris) sports a brightly colored pattern that allows it to fade into the coral it calls home. Now, scientists have discovered that the filefish doesn’t just look like a branch of coral—it smells like one, too. The researchers report online today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B that the animal picks up the smell of the corals it feeds on, which serves as a handy disguise from the cunning predators that use odor to hunt down their prey. To identify this chemical camouflage, the team placed cod—a common predator of reef fish—in tanks with filefish and a species of coral that either matched their diet or a coral species the fish hadn’t been feeding on. The filefish were hidden inside perforated containers within the aquarium so that the cod could only smell, and not see, their prey. The researchers found that cod were much less likely to hang out around the filefish container when the species of coral present matched the reef fish’s last meals. Exactly how the filefish retains the coral smell is still unknown, but the disguise even fooled coral-feeding crabs. When the researchers gave the crabs a choice between their favorite corals and a filefish that fed on their favorite corals, they often chose the filefish. Many invertebrate species, like caterpillars, are known to incorporate compounds from the plants they eat into the outer layer of their skin to hide from hungry predators. But the filefish is the first vertebrate species found to camouflage its smell, which means that the behavior could be even more widespread across the animal kingdom than previously thought.last_img read more