HHS funds work on dose-sparing H5N1 vaccines

first_img See also: The $14.4 million award to Iomai is intended to support completion of phase 1 clinical trials of a candidate vaccine with adjuvant, according to HHS. The company “may receive an additional $114 million in funding upon successful completion of the phase 1 trials.” The Novartis contract will help the company bring its MF59 adjuvant, used in seasonal flu vaccines for elderly people in Europe, to the United States, the company said. Iomai will use the funds to develop an adjuvant skin patch to be used with flu vaccines, while a GSK news release said only that the money would be used for an “innovative adjuvant technology.” GSK will use the HHS contract to conduct “research and development leading towards licensure of antigen-sparing prepandemic and pandemic vaccines with adjuvant” to protect more people, according to a company statement. The contract gives HHS the option to provide another $44 million for “future clinical development programs” for antigen-sparing vaccines, the company said. Hall said the company’s H5N1 vaccine is egg-based. In July 2006 GSK reported that in a clinical trial, an H5N1 vaccine coupled with the company’s adjuvant triggered a good immune response with only 3.8 micrograms (mcg) of antigen, as compared with 15 mcg of antigen in a typical dose of seasonal flu vaccine (for one flu strain). As noted in today’s HHS statement, early trials of the (unadjuvanted) H5N1 vaccine in the current stockpile showed that it took two 90-mcg doses to induce what was considered a protective immune response. The patch is applied to the skin over the site of vaccination, the company said. “Once the patch is applied, the adjuvant passes into the skin, targeting cells called Langerhans cells. Those specialized skin cells carry the adjuvant to the lymph nodes, where it works to boost an individual’s immune response to the vaccine.” The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awarded a 5-year, $63.3 million contract to British-based GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and a 5-year, $54.8 million contract to Swiss-based Novartis. In addition, Iomai Corp., Gaithersburg, Md., received a $14.4 million, 15-month contract, which could lead to an additional $114 million award, HHS announced in a news release. The aim of the contracts, HHS said, is to put each company in a position to produce, within 6 months after the emergence of a flu pandemic, either 150 million doses of an adjuvant-based pandemic vaccine or enough adjuvant for 150 million doses of such a vaccine. “The contracts also require each company to provide its proprietary adjuvant for U.S. Government–sponsored, independent evaluation with influenza vaccines from other manufacturers,” HHS said. “If we actually had licensed cell-based vaccines with an immunogenic adjuvant, it would put us in a much better position in the US to respond to pandemic influenza,” Osterholm said. The Novartis vaccine Fluad, which contains MF59, is licensed in Europe for preventing seasonal flu in people aged 65 and older, the company said. It said many studies have shown that the vaccine induced stronger antibody responses in elderly people than were seen with an unadjuvanted vaccine. In a news release, Novartis officials said their contract will be used to test the safety and effectiveness of the MF59 adjuvant in a pandemic flu vaccine and to support work on an MF59 production facility in Holly Springs, N.C. The vaccine will be grown in cell culture rather than in eggs. In May 2006 the company received an HHS contract to develop a cell-culture-based flu vaccine and a manufacturing facility for it. Jan 17 HHS news releasehttp://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2007pres/01/20070117b.html Jan 17 Novartis news releasehttp://cws.huginonline.com/N/134323/PR/200701/1098644_5.html With current technology, it would take about 6 months to start producing a vaccine well matched to the pandemic strain, HHS spokesman Bill Hall noted. “By having an adjuvant you can rapidly extend the number of people you can cover early on with vaccine,” he told CIDRAP News. Jan 17, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – In an effort to stretch the nation’s supply of vaccines for a potential influenza pandemic, federal health officials today announced contracts totaling $132.5 million to help three companies develop dose-sparing substances, or adjuvants, to be used with H5N1 flu vaccines. He also expressed gratification that the Novartis contract will support development of a cell-based vaccine. Cell-based production “will definitely shave time off the production of the [pandemic] vaccine,” although the pandemic strain will have to be identified first, he said. Nov 20, 2006, CIDRAP News story “HHS awards 3 contracts for more H5N1 vaccine” Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of the CIDRAP Web site, praised HHS for awarding the contracts. “Adjuvants likely will play an important role in extending the number of doses that will be available once a pandemic strain is identified and vaccine production begins,” he said. Novartis said several published studies have indicated that MF59 may reduce the amount of antigen needed in H5N1 vaccines and may help such vaccines provide cross-protection against slightly different, or “drifted,” strains of the virus. An Iomai news release said the additional funding is the estimated amount needed to bring the combination of vaccine and dose-sparing patch to licensure. If the H5N1 avian flu virus evolves into a pandemic strain, vaccines are expected to be in extremely short supply. HHS is stockpiling H5N1 vaccines, but in November the stockpile amounted to enough for only about 3 million people. And no one knows how effective the vaccines will be against an emerging pandemic strain. Hence HHS is funding efforts to make vaccine supplies stretch further and to produce vaccines faster than with the conventional method of growing them in chicken eggs. Jul 26, 2006, CIDRAP News story “Glaxo says its H5N1 vaccine works at low dose”last_img read more

Japan ‘Twitter killer’ victims consented to death, lawyers argue

first_imgA Japanese man dubbed the “Twitter killer” for luring his victims on social media admitted in court Wednesday to murdering nine people, local media said.But lawyers for Takahiro Shiraishi, 29, argued the charges should be reduced because the victims — who had expressed suicidal thoughts — gave their consent to be killed.Shiraishi, who is also accused of dismembering his victims and storing body parts in coolboxes, did not contest nine counts of murder, saying they “are all correct”, public broadcaster NHK reported. Topics : In an interview with the Mainichi Shimbun daily, Shiraishi said he disagreed with his lawyers and would tell prosecutors that he had “killed without consent”.”There were bruises on the back of the victims’ heads. It means there was no consent and I did it so that they wouldn’t resist,” he said in comments published on Wednesday.Shiraishi was detained three years ago by police investigating the disappearance of a 23-year-old woman who had reportedly tweeted about wanting to kill herself.After she went missing, her brother apparently gained access to her Twitter account, and noticed a suspicious handle.Police uncovered a grisly house of horrors behind Shiraishi’s front door on the morning of Halloween in 2017.Nine dismembered bodies, with as many as 240 bone parts stashed in coolers and toolboxes, had been sprinkled with cat litter in a bid to hide the evidence.Shiraishi told the Mainichi Shimbun he “didn’t plan on getting caught” and boasted of not being identified until his final killing.More than 600 people lined up for 13 public gallery seats to observe Wednesday’s first hearing, NHK said.Japan has the highest suicide rate among the Group of Seven industrialized nations, with more than 20,000 people taking their lives annually.The suicide rate has been falling since it peaked in 2003, however.center_img He is also facing rape charges, according to media reports.Shiraishi is accused of using Twitter to contact victims aged between 15 and 26 who posted online about taking their own lives, telling them he could help them in their plans — or even die alongside them.If convicted of murder, Shiraishi faces the death penalty, which is carried out by hanging in Japan.But his lawyers want the charges against him reduced to “murder with consent”, which carries a prison sentence of between six months and seven years.last_img read more

Inter to sign PSG star as replacement for Barca-bound Martinez

first_imgInter hope to sign striker Edinson Cavani as a free agent this summer to replace Barcelona-bound star Lautaro Martinez.Advertisement Loading… That is according to a report in Diario Sport, as outlined on the front page of their Friday edition, who outlined how the player’s proven quality and lack of a transfer fee make the Uruguayan a prime target.Cavani is out of contract in the France capital this summer and has been widely linked with an exit from Paris Saint-Germain, with Atletico de Madrid among the clubs linked to his signature.The 33-year-old was said to have agreed a personal agreement with Atleti in January while Marca and Cadena Ser both claimed at the time that the player was waiting on the deal to be completed as he is enthusiastic for moving to the Spanish capital.It was reported in January that PSG blocked a January move as they were demanding a €30m transfer fee, which Atleti were unwilling to play.Lautaro Martinez Read Also: Goalkeeper Ter Stegen to pen long-term Barcelona contractNow it appears the Milanese club are favourites for his signature as they seek a replacement for Martinez, who is Barcelona’s primary transfer target this year.The Argentine has a €111m release clause in Italy and it is thought that Barcelona will offer cash upfront plus players in exchange for the striker.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Promoted ContentWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?A Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of Art14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right Now7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeTV Characters Who Hated Each Other But Later Became Friends7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A VegetarianEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouAmazing Bridal Looks From Around The World10 Largest Cities In The WorldWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?last_img read more

The Government will give permission to open the CARs on May 11

first_imgMany professional athletes will return to activity on May 4, but the CARs, which are being disinfected with ozone, will not open until the 11th. This assuming that there are no unexpected and unwanted regrowths. A single positive in any of the CARs would mean the closure of the facilities.The CSD has kept the 59 federations informed of the deadlines in the meetings held by the CSD Working Group and also the Spanish Olympic Committee (COE) presided over by the highly respected and loved by the Olympic family, Alejandro Blanco. The Government will authorize via individual Superior Council of Sports (CSD) the individual trainings in the High Performance Centers (CAR) from May 11, according to confirmed to this newspaper sources of the Administration. The Blume Residence, together with the CSD, will be precisely the only one that could not take advantage of this term, since it needs aseptic measures that will take a little longer. The reinstatement of the Blume athletes will also be staggered.last_img read more