Parties gear up for post-poll scenarios

first_imgWith polling for Lok Sabha 2019 ending on Sunday, political parties in Maharashtra have called all their MLAs, sitting MPs and candidates for meetings on Monday and Tuesday to discuss the possible scenarios that may emerge afterresults are announced on May 23. The Bharatiya Janata Party’s (BJP) core committee will meet on Monday, while all its MLAs, MPs and candidates in Maharashtra will meet in Mumbai the following day. Revenue Minister Chandrakant Patil said, “This is a regular meeting. We have called the elected representatives on Tuesday. We are confident of a majority; there is no question of us getting panicky.” He reiterated that BJP-Shiv Sena combine will win up to 45 of the 48 seats in Maharashtra. Sena leaders, on the other hand, have been asked to remain in their constituencies. Sena chief Uddhav Thackeray is currently on a holiday in Europe and is likely to return within a day or two. Congress meetingNationalist Congress Party (NCP) president Sharad Pawar will in Delhi from Tuesday and will be joined by senior party leaders like Praful Patel. According to party sources, Mr. Pawar will remain in Delhi till there is some clarity on who will form the next government. Meanwhile, the Congress will hold a meeting of all its MLAs and leaders on Monday, chaired by its Maharashtra in-charge Mallikarjun Kharge. State unit Congress president Ashok Chavan said the party will discuss a new group leader in the Assembly, since Radhakrishna Vikhe-Patil has resigned from the post and as Leader of Opposition. The Congress will also discuss reports from its candidates about local leaders who worked against the official party candidate. Five Congress MLAs — Mr. Vikhe-Patil, Jaikumar Gore, Nitesh Rane, Abdul Sattar and Kalidas Kolambkar — are under the scanner for anti-party activities during elections.last_img read more

McMichael Canadian Art Collection bets big on past for 50th anniversary

first_img Login/Register With: A 50th anniversary is a big deal for a cultural institution. There’s enough history to celebrate, consider and, in some instances, reconsider. There’s the opportunity to refresh the institution’s profile and evaluate its position within contemporary art discourse. It’s an occasion, too, to strategize, to wonder, “Now what? Sure, we’ve made it this far – but what needs to be done to ensure another half-century?”The McMichael Canadian Art Collection is in the midst of just such a rumination – an exercise brought into even sharper focus last week when the famous woodsy gallery here, 40 kilometres northwest of Toronto, named British museum professional Ian Dejardin as its new director and chief executive officer. Lest we forget, it was 50 years ago this summer that the McMichael first opened its doors to the public as a Crown corporation of the province of Ontario. The deal that, on paper at least, transformed the McMichael from the fiefdom of founders Robert and Signe McMichael into a public trust had been reached in November, 1965. However, extensive and expensive renovations to the site meant that its roughly 200 artworks weren’t ready for their close-up until July.Alexander Young Jackson, October Morning, Algoma, 1920. (Toni Hafkenscheid/ University of Toronto Purchased by the Hart House Art Committee 1931/32) Advertisement Facebook Called, initially, the McMichael Conservation Collection of Art, the “collection” referenced in the moniker was unashamedly Canadian. Or at least unashamedly Canuck in its devotion to art of a particular ilk, namely oil sketches, drawings and paintings by the Group of Seven, Emily Carr and their contemporaries and followers, plus work by First Nations artists. Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more