Mikel Arteta calls on Arsenal fans to provide ‘powerful energy’ but knows he must convince them first

first_imgMikel Arteta knows he needs to build the trust of the Arsenal fans (Picture: Getty Images)Mikel Arteta wants Arsenal fans to provide his team with a powerful energy and in turn he promises to make their lives better as they will enjoy watching their team.The new Arsenal boss is desperate to repair a tense relationship between the team and the fans which festered under his predecessor, Unai Emery.A toxic atmosphere had developed at the Emirates, which was part of Granit Xhaka being stripped of the club captaincy after a clash with fans when he was substituted against Crystal Palace earlier in the season.Arteta, who captained the Gunners and won two FA Cups during his time as a player at the club, knows that the fans in north London can be a driving force for success and wants to build on the positive response his team received during his opening match as manager – a 1-1 draw at Bournemouth.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘I think energy is everything, in life, in football and in sports. If we are able to generate this it will give us a lift,’ said the Spaniard. Comment Mikel Arteta calls on Arsenal fans to provide ‘powerful energy’ but knows he must convince them first Arteta is looking to foster a relationship with players and fans (Picture: Getty Images)‘I was really pleased with how the fans treated the players [against Bournemouth] and I was happy that the players went to see the fans after the game as well because we need that connection.‘Slowly, we need to build that back to where it was. It’s going to be very powerful for us to use that.’Arteta knows full well that it is a two-way street and the fans need to have some encouragement in order to provide the energy he is looking for, especially when the atmosphere has been so poor in recent weeks.‘Hopefully we can change it,’ Arteta continued. ‘First I need to convince the players and then, if I can convince the players, afterwards we can convince the fans.‘I think it’s very, very important in my job. At the end of the day they’re expecting a lot from us.‘We have to give them enjoyment, we have to make their lives better and, when we win, it will be better because they will be happier.‘It’s our responsibility and we have to do everything we can to achieve that.’Arsenal host Chelsea at the Emirates on Sunday in a huge test for Arteta so early in his managerial career.The draw at Bournemouth left the Gunners 11th in the Premier League table and closer to the bottom three in points than fourth place, where Chelsea currently reside.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityAfter the point on the south coast, Arteta insisted his aim for the season was simply to make an impact on the team as quickly as possible.‘My only one now is to review the game and find solutions to do it better,’ he said after the draw with the Cherries.‘To attack better, to concede less on the counter-attack, to defend better and prepare a good training session for them to improve them, that’s all.‘I don’t look at the games against Chelsea or [Manchester] United – it’s now. At the moment the urgency is now. And we need an impact now.’MORE: Paul Scholes names Arsenal’s three key players and the problem Mikel Arteta must sort out firstMORE: Granit Xhaka ‘angry’ with Mikel Arteta after talks over Arsenal exit Phil HaighFriday 27 Dec 2019 11:17 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link2.4kShares Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Beat writers predict outcome of SU’s final regular season game against Pittsburgh

first_imgSyracuse (4-7, 2-5 atlantic Coast) goes down to Heinz Field for its last game of the season against Pittsburgh (7-4, 4-3) Saturday at 12:30 p.m. The Orange is coming off a 45-14 beat down by Florida State, while the Panthers won, 56-14, over Duke.Tomer Langer (5-3)Squeezed outPittsburgh 34, Syracuse 14With some spots still open, Syracuse still has a chance to make a bowl game if it makes to five wins, but it’s unlikely that’ll happen. Overall, head coach Dino Babers’ first year went about as expected. The biggest question mark now is the health of quarterback Eric Dungey. SU has been banged up a lot this year, especially down the stretch, and a lot of other key players missed games. But, assuming Dungey doesn’t play, this will be the second straight season he misses the last several games with some sort of “upper-body injury.” And the only thing that’s maybe even more concerning than his injuries is to what lengths the team’s gone to try to conceal it.Chris Libonati (8-3)On the prowlPittsburgh 38, Syracuse 17I had Syracuse as a 5-7 team at the beginning of the season, and I stand by my thinking that SU would have gotten there had Eric Dungey not gotten hurt. But the reality is that he did. Pitt’s biggest weakness is its pass defense, and I’m just not sure that Zack Mahoney has enough tools to take advantage of that. The Orange doesn’t get its fifth win and narrowly misses a bowl game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textJon Mettus (8-3)Hail 2 PittPittsburgh 48, Syracuse 14Babers’ first year will come to an end Saturday with a loss to Pittsburgh. Because of the win over Virginia Tech and 4-4 record at one point, it’ll be a disappointment when the Orange misses a bowl game. But remember, at 4-8 SU is exactly where we (or at least I) expected it to be. SU has dealt with massive injuries on both sides of the ball yet still made progress. Get ready for the fun part: Year 2. Comments Published on November 25, 2016 at 10:33 pm Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Badgers to take on UCF in NCAA second round matchup

first_imgFollowing a memorable sendoff from the McClimon Soccer Complex this season with a 2-0 win over DePaul in the opening round of the NCAA Tournament, the fourth-seeded Wisconsin women’s soccer team (19-2-2) looks ahead to this Friday’s second round matchup against Central Florida (17-4-0) as they aim for a deep playoff run.Unlike the Badgers, who essentially cruised to their first round victory over DePaul following two early goals by senior forward Cara Walls in the first half last Saturday, the UCF nights found themselves in a 1-1 deadlock with more than 20 minutes in their match against Georgia. It took a timely effort from midfielder Ashley Spivey the team’s leading scorer, to finish off a cross in the 69th minute from forward Hannah DeBose for the 2-1 lead and eventual final score.Friday’s second round match marks the meeting of two of the nation’s premiere defenses, with the Badgers allowing just 0.30 goals per game and the Knights yielding 0.48. Wisconsin also boasts 18 shutouts out of their 23 total games this season while UCF has 18 of their own through 21 games. Both starting goalies won the goalkeeper of the year awards this season for their respective conferences, with Wisconsin’s redshirt senior Genevieve Richard earning the Big Ten’s distinction and UCF junior Connie Organ taking the honor for the American Athletic Conference.As dominant as both defenses have been all season, the two sides also bring forth formidable offensive attacks that have played an instrumental role in their team’s success so far. For Wisconsin, Walls leads the way with 14 goals in 19 games this season for a squad that averages 1.83 goals per game this season. Setting up the majority of Wall’s goals this season have been the midfield duo of junior Kinley McNicoll and sophomore Rose Lavelle, whose combined 18 assists have helped produce less than half (43 percent) of the team’s total goals scored this season (42).When the Badgers find themselves in a tight match and in desperate need of a game-winner, redshirt senior forward Kodee Williams has been the one to answer the call. Among her total of seven goals this season, five of them have been game winners for Wisconsin this season.Perhaps the biggest matchup coming into Friday’s match will be UCF’s star forward Tatiana Coleman against Wisconsin’s stout defense. With a team-leading 12 goals and 10 assists already this season, the AAC Co-Offensive Player of the Year will look to get past the experienced Badger backline, led by senior Alexandra Heller, junior Brianna Stelzer and sophomore Kylie Schwarz. So far this season, Wisconsin’s opponents have been held to just nine shots per game and a measly 34 percent shot percentage. When Coleman manages to get an on-target attempt, however, she’s been efficient this season, scoring on less than half (49.3 percent) of those shots.Rutgers and No. 2 seeded Penn St., the other two Big Ten Teams in the tournament, survived their opening round matches and will be in action this weekend. Rutgers takes on the No. 2 seed Virginia while the Nittany Lions face off against Connecticut.The remaining rounds of the tournament will be at neutral sites. Wisconsin and UCF will kick off Friday at 1:30 p.m. central time, at Florida State’s Seminole Soccer Complex.last_img read more

NFL schedule: Week 14 games, TV coverage

first_imgThe NFL schedule in Week 14 features a handful of games that will have a direct impact on the playoff picture regardless of the results. And they’re the last few games of the weekend.First, in the late Sunday afternoon slot, the Eagles travel to Dallas in hopes of avenging their loss to the Cowboys earlier in the season. Then, on “Sunday Night Football,” two first-place NFC teams in the Rams and Bears clash with playoff seeding on the line. The capper on Week 14 is a massive game as far as the NFC wild-card playoff picture is concerned. Minnesota travels to Seattle as both second-place teams battle for the 5th and 6th seeds in the NFC playoffs. MORE: Watch the NFL live and on-demand with fuboTV (7-day free trial)Below is the full schedule for Week 14 of the 2018 NFL season.NFL schedule: Week 14(All times ET)GameTimeTV/streamingJaguars at Titans (Thursday)8:20 p.m.FOX/fuboTVJets at Bills1 p.m.CBS/fuboTV (regional)Giants at Redskins1 p.m.FOX/fuboTV (regional)Saints at Buccaneers1 p.m.FOX/fuboTV (regional)Patriots at Dolphins1 p.m.CBS/fuboTV (regional)Ravens at Chiefs1 p.m.CBS/fuboTV (regional)Colts at Texans1 p.m.CBS/fuboTV (regional)Falcons at Packers1 p.m.FOX/fuboTV (regional)Panthers at Browns1 p.m.FOX/fuboTV (regional)Broncos at 49ers4:05 p.m.CBS/fuboTV (regional)Bengals at Chargers4:05 p.m.CBS/fuboTV (regional)Lions at Cardinals4:25 p.m.FOX/fuboTV (regional)Steelers at Raiders4:25 p.m.FOX/fuboTV (regional)Eagles at Cowboys4:25 p.m.FOX/fuboTV (regional)Rams at Bears8:20 p.m.NBC/fuboTVVikings at Seahawks (Monday)8:15 p.m.ESPNlast_img read more

Ohio FFA Convention schedule

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 91st annual Ohio FFA State Convention and Expo is being held May 2nd and 3rd at the state fairgrounds in Columbus. FFA Chapters from across the state will be interviewing, competing, and recognized on stage. A complete schedule can be found here.last_img

Virginia Farmhouse Wins Top LEED Honors

first_imgA house built into the side of a Virginia hillside on a working water buffalo farm has been named the outstanding single-family home of the year in the 2013 LEED for Homes Awards by the U.S. Green Building Council.“Earthship Farmstead” in the western Virginia town of Stuart, was one of seven projects recognized last month by the U.S. Green Building Council. It was designed by Kaplan Thompson Architects of Portland, Maine. (Jesse Thompson, the lead architect on the project, is partnered at the firm with Phil Kaplan of GBA’s Green Architects’ Lounge.) The house was built by Structures Design/Build.The 3,600-sq. ft. house, which was completed in 2012, includes three bedrooms and an outside terrace nearly as big as the house itself. It meets both the Passivhaus and LEED Platinum standards, the USGBC says. “Earthship Farmstead,” Thompson said, is a reference to the New Mexico Earthships of Michael Reynolds.According to an article about the house appearing in the Wall Street Journal‘s “Mansion” section on May 9, the house was built for David and Liisa Wallace, an English couple who had wanted to leave the Britain and found the 104-acre parcel in rural Patrick County with the help of Ms. Wallace’s brother.The Wallaces wanted a house that disappeared into the landscape, and when viewed from atop its sod roof that’s more ore less what they got. But Thompson said building this insulated, underground structure capable of meeting the Passivhaus standard was very complex. “It got complicated,” he said. Energy-saving featuresAnother challenge was getting enough direct solar gain from a building site that faces east. Portions of the building are underground, but Thompson brought some of the structure away from the hillside and installed large south-facing windows to pull in winter sunlight, a description of the project on the firm’s website says.Because the house is designed to meet the German Passivhaus building standard, Kaplan Thompson says it will use 90% less energy for heating than a conventionally built house and will have a heating budget of roughly $500 a year.Other features listed by Kaplan Thompson:Insulation levels of R-30 in the slab, R-30 in the walls, and R-40 to R-60 in the roof. Insulation is cellulose and water-blown EPS foam.Domestic hot water via rooftop solar panels. The system has electric-resistance backup.Tripled-glazed windows and doors manufactured by Makrowin.Heating and cooling provided by Mitsubishi heat pumps with a total output of 18,000 Btu/hour. Thompson says there are three units, both ducted and ductless, each with a half-ton capacity.An energy recovery ventilator made by Zehnder.A 12-kW photovoltaic array mounted on a barn roof that supplies all of the power for the farm.Environmentally friendly materials, including local white oak flooring, cabinets of Virginia black walnut, American Clay Paint, and local patio stone. Commissioning a house that will lastThompson said the Wallaces were completely uninterested in building a conventional, wood-framed house, and drawn instead to a structure more in keeping with their European roots.“It’s not inexpensive to build like this,” he said. “They wanted a very nice house that also had these technical features. That was one of their prime goals. You’re building a very tough concrete structure; it’s not how American houses are usually built.“They thought American homes were far too flimsy,” he continued, “and they said, ‘We are not having an American 2×4 or 2×6 house where you could put your fists through the walls. We are not doing that kind of house. We want a tough house. We want a house like we would expect at home.”center_img The roof was a major building challengeTo comply with the Wallaces’ request for a roof where sheep could graze, Kaplan Thompson used Lite-Deck steel-reinforced EPS panels as a base and then poured a concrete cap that is 8 to 10 inches thick on top of them. The concrete is waterproofed with a fluid-applied membrane made by Carlisle. All of that is insulated with 4 inches of termite-treated EPS rigid insulation, followed by 18 inches of earth.The Carlisle membrane is protected by an embedded electric field, Thompson said, that can be used to test for leaks over the lifetime of the house. The technology is used in structures such as parking garages to pinpoint leaks in places that can’t be inspected visually.Although the Wallaces didn’t say how much the house cost in total, David Wallace said the roof alone was several hundred thousand dollars, the WSJ reported. It should, however, last for 50 years or more, Thompson said, in part because the steel-reinforced concrete is thermally stable and not subject to freeze-thaw cycles.And as to the couple’s wish to graze their farm animals on the roof, Thompson said engineers nixed the idea.“The engineer said no, no cows,” Thompson said by telephone. “They mostly worried about the punching loads of the hooves and the waterproofing, so they said, ‘Please, don’t actually put cows and sheep on the roof.’ ” (The cow standing on the roof in the photo at the firm’s website is there courtesty of Photoshop).last_img read more

Can Atmospheric Combustion Work in a Spray-Foam-Insulated Attic?

first_imgLet’s say you bring the attic inside the building enclosure by putting spray foam insulation at the roofline (the case with the two furnaces in my previous article on this topic). Now, let’s put some numbers to it. (Yes, we’re going to do math, but it’s just simple arithmetic. I know some of you were hoping for partial differential equations, but you’ll just have to console yourself today by memorizing some more digits of Pi, I guess.)If the attic has a floor area of 800 square feet and an average height of 4 feet, for example, the volume would be 3,200 cubic feet. Divide that number by 50 to find the maximum capacity appliance you could put in the attic, and you get 64,000 BTU/hr.That would be a medium-sized furnace. But you could put only one in this attic. Put two of them up there, and the codes say you don’t have enough air for them. And an 80,000 BTU/hr or 100,000 BTU/hr furnace, neither of which is uncommon in homes, would be right out.One way to get more volume of indoor air for your atmospheric combustion appliances would be to connect the space they’re in to other spaces in the home. You could put a couple of grilles in the wall separating a mechanical room from the conditioned space, for example. The codes specify how you should do that and how big the openings have to be.Another way to get more air is to count infiltration. Again, check the codes if you’re planning to do that. Another method specified in the code is to use a single opening. The image at left shows a basement mechanical room attempting to satisfy the code requirement this way.With both the high-low vents and single opening methods, the building codes specify the amount of vent area required. As with calculating volume when you use indoor air, the vent area required is based on the total capacity of the combustion appliances.Here are the rules for the two-permanent-openings method:1 square inch per 4,000 BTU/hr  –  vertical ducts1 square inch per 2,000 BTU/hr  –  horizontal ductsWhen using the one-permanent-opening method, you need:1 square inch per 3,000 BTU/hr  –  vertical or horizontal ductHow many code violations do you see?Now go back and look at the two photos I opened the article with (at the top of the page). Both use the one-permanent-opening method and would require 1 square inch for each 3,000 BTU/hr of capacity. The first one is a 4-inch-diameter duct, so the area would be about 12.6 square inches. Code would allow it for a maximum capacity of about 37,700 BTU/hr. In other words, it’s probably too small because there aren’t many furnaces that small.There’s still the issue of the tape covering the louvers, of course. And there’s another code violation as well. Combustion air vents are supposed to have a minimum clearance of 6 inches from the front of the combustion appliance.The furnace in the second photo comes closer to meeting code. If it’s a 6-inch duct, it would have an area of 28 square inches and meet the requirement for an 84,800 BTU/hr furnace. If it’s an 8-inch duct, it could meet the requirement for about 150,000 BTU/hr in total capacity. It still doesn’t meet the 6-inch clearance requirement, though.But will it work?Whether any of the methods above will work is debatable and depends on what criteria you use to gauge acceptability. Here are a few pitfalls:Using indoor air still means using outdoor air. Each cubic foot (or cubic meter) of indoor air that gets pulled into a combustion appliance will leave the house with the exhaust gases. When that happens, another cubic foot gets pulled in from leaks through the building enclosure.Air doesn’t always follow the arrows we draw on diagrams. You can put all the vents you want into a mechanical room, but whether air moves in the direction we’d like it to depends on the which way the pressure difference pushes it. Wind, stack effect, and other mechanical systems could cause air to flow the “wrong way.”Bringing combustion air in from outdoors can waste energy and lead to comfort problems. We know the old saw about how “a house needs to breathe” is a myth. Houses need to be able to dry out and they need good indoor air quality. They don’t need extra leaks. It’s the people who need to breathe.Occupants sometimes seal them up because they don’t understand why there’s a hole in their house. It happens, just like they sometimes caulk the weep holes in a brick wall.As I’ve said before, it’s time to put atmospheric combustion appliances on the pile of obsolete technologies. Let them take their rightful place as relics of a bygone era, along with steam engines, typewriters, and slide rules. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. Check out his in-depth course, Mastering Building Science at Heatspring Learning Institute, and follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. Some older homes, though, have a type of furnace that isn’t made anymore: the natural draft furnace. The photo at left shows what they look like. Notice that there are two places where this furnace pulls in air, and these guys pull in a lot of air. They’re also easier to backdraft, but that’s not our focus here.Where does the air come from?So if you’ve got any type of atmospheric combustion appliance, you need to make sure it gets air for combustion. The two options are:Indoor airOutdoor airLet’s take a look at them separately.Using indoor air for combustionIf you’re going to use indoor air, there’s got to be enough of it inside the house. Two building codes that address this issue are the National Fire Protection Association Standard 54 (NFPA-54) and the International Residential Code (IRC).Both say the same thing about using indoor air for combustion. The space that the atmospheric combustion air can draw from has to have at least 50 cubic feet of volume for each 1,000 BTU/hour of appliance capacity. Using outdoor air for combustionThe other way to provide air for your combustion appliances is to bring it in from outdoors. The standard way to do this is with “high-low vents.” The image at left shows an example. Two ducts are open to this mechanical room in a basement. One of them terminates near the ceiling, the other near the floor.[Image credit: International Code Council]The image at left and the image below are from the 2012 IRC and show two ways to do the high-low vents with vertical ducts. It’s OK for the ducts to pull combustion air from the crawl space or attic as long as those spaces communicate directly with the outdoors. In the first diagram, the low vent is connected to the vented crawl space, and the high vent is connected to the attic.[Image credit: International Code Council]In the diagram at left, both vents are shown connected to the attic. That’s why the furnace in the image at left has louvers in the cover. It allows air from the surrounding space to be pulled in for combustion. This is what we call the standard efficiency furnace. If you buy a new furnace these days and want to get the cheapest one you can, this is probably what it’ll look like. A while back I wrote about the incompatibility of putting an atmospheric combustion furnace in a sealed attic. Most often the attic is sealed by installing spray foam insulation at the roofline, thus bringing the attic inside the building enclosure and turning it into conditioned space (directly or indirectly). The good news is that some installers understand this problem and seek to address it. The bad news is what a few of them do.Combustion air retrofitsThe photo at right is a case in point. The furnace was up in the attic before the spray foam was installed. The homeowner hired a spray foam contractor to improve the building enclosure but the budget didn’t include enough money to change out the furnace at the same time.I don’t know if the combustion air retrofit you see above was done by the spray foam installer or the HVAC contractor, but in either case, this one’s almost certainly not going to work. Here are the main problems:Inadequate duct size. They used a 4-inch flex duct that you usually see on bath fans (which have their own problems), and it ran at least 20 feet to the place where it exited the attic. This would not meet the code requirement for combustion air inlets, as you’ll see below.Poor duct installation. The duct wasn’t pulled tight, further reducing the air flow through the duct.Tape over furnace louvers. The louver area is designed to allow the proper amount of combustion air to enter the furnace. By covering some of them with tape, the installer of this retrofit may be guaranteeing the opposite of what they were aiming for: less combustion air, not more.[Photo credit: Nikki Krueger]The image at left shows a better installation. The duct looks like it’s 6 inches or 8 inches in diameter, and it’s made of rigid metal. Both of those things will allow more air to move through.And that air might even move toward the furnace instead of away from it. Of course, there’s no guarantee of that. As my friend David Richardson likes to say, combustion air doesn’t care which way we show the arrows pointing on our diagram. Air flows from areas of higher pressure to areas of lower pressure. Under some circumstances, air might flow out through that inlet rather than in.The need for airNow let’s go a little further. Let’s look at what building codes say is the right way to do it. The image at left shows the burners in a particular type of furnace. When you pull the cover off of this furnace, you could stick your fingers right there in the flames. (I said you could do it. I certainly don’t recommend it, though.)What that means is that the flames are open to the air inside the furnace cabinet. Since we know combustion is the chemical reaction of a fuel (natural gas in this case) with oxygen, there’s got to be a supply of air to keep it going. The air in the furnace cabinet itself would be exhausted quickly, so more air has got to come in somewhere, right?last_img read more

Cool Kickstarter Campaigns for Video Professionals

first_imgThe Pulse is an interesting camera add-on for Canon and Nikon DSLRs. Essentially, the add-on allows users to control their DSLR camera remotely via smartphone and Bluetooth from up to 100 feet. This will come in handy for many videographers during shoots where timelapse video is needed.Pulse’s interface is well designed and seems to be incredibly easy to navigate through. It uses USB to connect to the camera, which is compatible with most Canon and Nikon DSLR cameras. Through Pulse you can control up to 3 pulse-equipped cameras at one time for maximum coverage. You can also use Pulse to control the ISO and Shutter Speed in order to capture sunrise and sunset timelapse videos.The Pulse app is going to be available for free on both iPhone and Android devices.Seeking: $50,000 USD3. PhoneDrone Ethos It may sound crazy, but when you’re in a pinch, the latest smart phones can actually capture footage high quality enough that it can be mixed in with cinema footage. Both iPhone and many Android smart phones can capture video in 4k, so your phone is a real option for you. With that in mind — if you don’t have thousands of dollars to purchase a high-end drone, then the PhoneDrone Ethos could be a nice solution for you.This small drone is compact, lightweight, and compatible with both iPhone and Android. A lot of people might be hesitant to send their phone 100 ft. in the air, but they need not worry. The PhoneDrone comes with a backup system to bring your device home in one piece. Your phone is also in a Protective Universal Mount case, which keeps your phone safe and waterproofed.Seeking: $100,000 USDGot any Kickstarter campaigns we should know about? Let us know in the comments below! The search for “the next big thing” in video gear never stops. Here are a few contenders for the title that are currently raising cash on Kickstarter.With video gear technology advancing so rapidly these days, people are constantly on the hunt for the next big thing. Trying to find tech that’s worth your time and money can be overwhelming, but Kickstarter is always a great place to look. Here are three campaigns that we believe are worth some time and money.1. Hercules Camera Motion Control Systemcenter_img Project Premise: With the Hercules, Rollocam has developed the World’s Smallest Camera Motion Control System. This patent pending technology will work with cameras up to 20 pounds, so users can attach anything from a smart phone to a RED SCARLET.The small (but robust) design of the Hercules allows users to store it in something as small as a shirt pocket, and the system itself can be assembled in a matter of seconds. Another great aspect of the Hercules is it’s ability to provide steady camera movement on any flat surface without the need of tracks.Hercules is currently at the tail end of its campaign and had been seeking to obtain at least $25,000 in funding. They have eclipsed that number and are sitting north of $250,000. While many of the premium rewards have been spoken for, there are plenty of the standard rewards, which gets you a Hercules for $50 less than the suggested retail price.Seeking: $25,000 USD2. Pulse Wireless DSLR Controllast_img read more

CWG probe: CVC asks for reports by month-end

first_imgThe Central Vigilance Commission (CVC), probing alleged financial irregularities in construction and procurement works related to the Commonwealth Games, has directed all agencies concerned to submit their reports by the month-end.Official sources said a reminder has recently been issued to Central Public Works Department (CPWD), Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD), Delhi Development Authority (DDA) and Public Works Department (PWD) in this regard.The move came after Central Vigilance Commissioner P J Thomas objected to the “lackadaisical approach” and continuous delay by agencies in submitting replies to the queries raised by the anti-corruption watchdog, they said.”We have issued reminders to all the agencies and directed them to submit replies. They have been told to give point-wise answers to our queries by the end of October,” a senior CVC official said.He said, based on their replies, the CVC will give its findings or final report to a committee formed by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh headed by former Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) of India V K Shungloo.”All the Chief Vigilance Officers (CVOs) in the concerned organisations have been asked specifically to pursue the matter,” the officer said.An analysis by Chief Technical Examination Wing of CVC has found alleged financial and administrative irregularities in 16 construction and procurement projects.Six of them are being done by PWD, three by MCD, two each by CPWD, DDA, NDMC and one by RITES, a Government of India Enterprise, the CVC report said.According to the report, “Almost all the organisations executing works for Commonwealth Games have considered inadmissible factors to jack-up the reasonable price to justify award of work at quoted rates citing urgent or emergent circumstances.”advertisementThe CVC has written a letter of complaint to CBI asking for a probe into alleged criminal conspiracy by unknown MCD officials in granting work for upgradation of street lighting in the national capital.Meanwhile, the agency has also asked the CWG Organising Committee and the Sports Ministry to keep a sample of each items of the equipment and props hired from foreign suppliers for the Games venues ready for its inspection.last_img read more

March 10 2008 We continue our series of reports a

first_imgMarch 10, 2008 We continue our series of reports about the installation of a set of solar panels that will provide power for lighting in the visitors parking lot and for the visitors path from the parking lot to the entrance of the visitors center. [See prior reports from 2/18 through 3/3/08]. The frame to hold the solar panels has been completed and utilities manager Scott Riley and crew Brendan Scott install the first panel. We continue our series of reports about the installation of a set of solar panels that will provide power for lighting in the visitors parking lot and for the visitors path from the parking lot to the entrance of the visitors center. [See prior reports from 2/18 through 3/3/08]. The frame to hold the solar panels has been completed and utilities manager Scott Riley and crew Brendan Scott install the first panel. [Photo: Amber Klatt & text: sa] Construction crew David Ledbetter and Brendan tighten the panels to the steel frame. The top of the Crafts III Visitors Center is visible in the background. Arizona State University, under the leadership of Program Manager William Shisler, has awarded Arcosanti this gift of solar panels from their Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory. [Photo: Scott Riley & text: sa] Our site electrician Dr. Sparks, in an interview with BigBug Canyon Country News reporter Bruce Colbert: “The real coup was getting the eight solar panels. Arizona State University Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory donated the solar panels to us. The ASU PTL tests the paenls for their wattage capacity, heat and humidity durability and basically put the panels through the wringer to see how they stand up, then they gave them to us.” We send a very big THANK YOU to William Shisler and the ASU Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory. Report continues on 3/13/08. [Photo & text: sa]last_img read more