BAHAMAS International Womens Day recognizes women in rural communities

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, March 7, 2018 – Nassau -The Bahamas will focus on women and girls who live in the remote areas of the archipelago, namely the Family Island Communities, in celebration of International Women’s Day, March 8, 2018.The Minister of Social Services and Urban Development, the Hon. Lanisha Rolle, encouraged Bahamians to assist and support women in strengthening their communities, to help to build families and country. Related Items: She said women in rural communities have endured devastating damages as a result of natural disasters, low employment opportunities, limited weekly air and sea travel to and from islands and more.“Despite these challenges, the women in these communities have been resilient and strong. Many of them have managed to eke out a livelihood through sheer grit and determination, using the natural resources around them to become skilled in straw craft, farming, fishing and making preservatives.  As a result, they have been able to sustain their families and remain in their communities,” she said. Minister Rolle saluted the women of the Family Islands, The Bahamas and around the world.A Women’s Forum on Thursday, March 8 at Harry C. Moore Auditorium will address the topic, “Challenges and Opportunities in Achieving Gender Equality and Empowerment of Rural Women and Girls.” A special video documentary showcasing the determination of women and girls in rural communities in The Bahamas and sponsored by the Department of Gender and Family Affairs will be aired on ZNS TV.By: Kathryn Campbell (BIS)Photo captions:Header: The Hon. Lanisha Rolle, Minister of Social Services and Urban Development, speaks about International Women’s Day 2018 (far right); Emma Foulkes, Deputy Permanent Secretary (centre); and Coralee Adderley.Insert: Parliamentary Secretary the Hon. Vaughn Miller is shown first from left.BIS Photos/Derek Smithlast_img read more

UPDATE ZERO Letters Of Interest Received For Vacant School Committee Seat So

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington Board of Selectmen and Wilmington School Committee will hold a joint meeting on Monday, August 13, 2018 to fill the School Committee seat recently vacated by Peggy Kane.  The meeting will take place within the Board of Selectmen’s Meeting scheduled for that evening.Per Massachusetts General Law Chapter 41, Section 11, the remaining six School Committee members and the five Selectmen are responsible in appointing a resident to fill Kane’s unexpired term, which is up in April 2019. The “winning” candidate would need a simple majority — affirmative votes from at least six of the eleven officials — to secure the appointment.Residents wishing to serve on the School Committee must send a letter of interest to the Town Manager’s Office (directed to Kevin A. Caira, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 121 Glen Road, Wilmington, MA 01887) by Friday, July 27, 2018 at 4:30pm.At the Monday, July 9 Board of Selectmen Meeting, Town Manager Jeff Hull announced that ZERO letters of interest had been received since the announcement two weeks ago.“We have not received any applications to this point. I would encourage individuals with an interest in serving on the School Committee to please submit a letter of interest,” requested Hull.The Town Manager’s Office will distribute any received letters to each member of the Board of Selectmen and School Committee, giving them a couple of weeks to have conversations with candidates prior to the August 13 meeting.**UPDATE** What do you know? After telling Wilmington Apple several weeks ago he was interested in the seat, Jesse Fennelly — who was the runner up in April’s School Committee race — reports he did just send his letter of interest to Town Hall.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSELECTMEN NEWS: Selectmen To Discuss Senior Center, Palmer Park, WHS Gym Floor At September 9 MeetingIn “Government”SELECTMEN NOTEBOOK: 6 Things That Happened At This Month’s Selectmen’s MeetingIn “Government”SELECTMEN NOTEBOOK: 5 Things That Happened At Last Week’s Selectmen’s MeetingIn “Government”last_img read more

3 awarded death penalty one 20yr jail for war crimes

first_imgwar crimesThe International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) on Tuesday sentenced three war criminals to death and one another to 20-year jail for crimes against humanity committed during the 1971 liberation war in Sudharampur upazila of Noakhali district.The three condemned convicts are – Amir Ahmed alias Amir Ali, Abul Kalam alias AKM Mansur, Md Joynul Abedin. Abdul Kuddus was sentenced to 20-year jail.Of them, Abul Kalam alias AKM Mansur has been on the run.A three-member ICT bench led by justice Md Shahinur Islam pronounced the verdict, said prosecutor Jahid Imam.Earlier on 6 February, the tribunal concluded the hearing of arguments from both sides on the trial of four men for their alleged involvement in crimes against humanity conducted during the liberation war in 1971 in Noakhali’s Sudharampur upazila and kept the verdict pending for any day.The prosecution pressed charges against five people, including the four in the war crimes case. As another accused of the case, M Yusuf, died after the pressing of the charges, the deceased was not indicted.On 20 June 2016, the tribunal framed three specific charges against four people for their alleged involvement in crimes.The investigators started the probe against the five suspected war criminals on 16 November 2014 and submitted a report before the prosecution on 31 August, 2015.Three charges include killing of over 100 people, including 41 of Sonapur and Sreepur villages, in Sudarampur upazila on 15 June 1971.last_img read more

UNESCO controversial custodian of culture

first_imgUNESCO on Friday was to pick its new head after a cliffhanger election that came as the US and Israel announced plans to withdraw from the troubled UN cultural body.The sprawling Paris-based agency was founded in 1945 when the United Nations was created to prevent another world war.The organisation has seen its share of controversy over the past seven decades.Here are five facts about the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization:195 countriesUNESCO, which currently has 195 members, says it aims to build peace through education, science, culture and communication.It is best known for its prestigious World Heritage List of outstanding cultural and natural sites.UNESCO also promotes the right to education for all, sustainable development and efforts to tackle social and ethical issues-particularly in Africa.Heritage sitesThe constantly evolving World Heritage List currently runs to 1,073 cultural and natural sites considered to be of universal value.Among the most well-known are the Grand Canyon, the Great Wall of China, the Old City of Jerusalem, Ha Long Bay in Vietnam and Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe.UNESCO also currently has 54 sites on its list of World Heritage in Danger, including national parks in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which are under threat from war, and the fabled Malian desert town of Timbuktu.ControversyIn 2011 US president Barack Obama suspended funding for UNESCO-about 22 per cent of its annual budget-for accepting Palestine as a member.The Jewish state, Israel, and its ally oppose any move by UN bodies to recognise the Palestinian territories as a state, saying the matter can be resolved only in a negotiated Middle East peace deal.In the years since, UNESCO has been the scene of several flare-ups over Arab-sponsored resolutions critical of Israel.In May, Israel was infuriated by a resolution identifying it as “the occupying power” in the disputed city of Jerusalem.In July, the UN body declared the Old City of Hebron in the occupied West Bank an endangered World Heritage site, further angering Israel while delighting Palestinians.Former president Ronald Reagan first withdrew the US from UNESCO in 1984, accusing it of anti-Americanism and corruption. Washington reclaimed its seat in 2002, under George W Bush.Apartheid South Africa also spurned UNESCO. The country returned in 1994, only after Nelson Mandela became leader.Massive monument rescueUNESCO spearheaded a 1960s campaign to save the 3,000-year-old temples of ancient Nubia, which were threatened by the construction of the Aswan dam.A multinational team of archaeologists, engineers and heavy equipment operators dismantled the Abu Simbel temples block by block and reassembled them out of harm’s way at a cost of $300 million in 2017 dollars (250 million euros).The mammoth project drew international attention to the value of safeguarding cultural heritage.last_img read more

Bangladeshi survivor recalls Tunisia boat capsize

first_imgA survivor of a boat carrying migrants that sunk in the Mediterranean during the night of 9 and 10 May rests at a shelter in the Tunisian coastal city of Zarzis on 11 May, 2019. Photo: AFPA Bangladeshi farmer watched dozens drown beside him in the Mediterranean before “God sent us the fishermen”, who saved him from the cold waters and took him to Tunisia.Ahmed Bilal was one of 16 survivors of the shipwreck, in which an estimated 60 people died on Friday while trying to reach Italy.”I can’t stop myself crying,” said Bilal, who lost two younger relatives in the accident, from a Red Crescent emergency centre in the southern Tunisian coastal town of Zarzis.The 30-year-old said he began his journey to Europe six months ago, flying with three others to Dubai and onwards to Istanbul in Turkey.From there they took another flight to the Libyan capital Tripoli, Bilal said, where they joined around 80 other Bangladeshis and were held in a room in western Libya for three months.”I already thought I would die in Libya,” he said. “We had food only once a day, sometimes less. There was one toilet for 80 people. We could not wash — only our teeth — and we were crying, begging for food.”Medical charity Doctors Without Borders (MSF) estimates 6,000 migrants in Libya are being detained “in conditions that generally fall well below international standards”. Survivors of a boat carrying migrants that sunk in the Mediterranean during the night of 9 and 10 May, gather at a shelter in the Tunisian coastal city of Zarzis on 11 May, 2019. Photo: AFPThe situation has worsened since eastern commander Khalifa Haftar launched an offensive to take Tripoli last month, with more than 450 people killed due to fighting linked to that military campaign, according to the World Health Organization.- ‘I have nothing now’ -Bilal had no idea what he would face when he embarked on the journey from Bangladesh’s Sylhet region, where he had seen villagers with relatives in Europe live a better life.After his family sold their land, the father of two paid a Bangladeshi smuggler nicknamed “Good Luck” around $7,000 (6,230 euros) to arrange the trip.”He said we would have a better life and we believed him. I am sure most of the people he sends die on the way”, said Bilal.He and the other migrants left northwestern Libya on a large boat, before being transferred to a smaller one.Manzour Mohammed Metwella, an Egyptian who was on board, said the boat “started to sink almost immediately.””We swam all night,” said the 21-year-old.Survivors said all the passengers were men, with 51 from Bangladesh, three Egyptians, several Moroccans, Chadians and other Africans.After seeing people drown in front of his eyes, Bilal said he “was losing hope myself, but God sent us the fishermen who saved us.”The fishermen were able to rescue 14 Bangladeshis, one Moroccan, and the Egyptian Metwella.”If the Tunisian fishermen hadn’t seen them, there wouldn’t have been any survivors and we would have never known about this” boat sinking, said Mongi Slim from the Red Crescent.The survivors now have 60 days to decide whether to return home, seek asylum through the United Nations refugee agency, or try their luck in Tunisia.But there is no asylum law in Tunisia and residents are already facing high unemployment and overstretched public services.”We lost so much, I have nothing now,” said Bilal, admitting he still wants to reach Europe to earn money.”But I don’t want to go on the sea like this again, I am done with this risk.”Humanitarian organisations have faced hostility from governments for running rescue missions in the Mediterranean.last_img read more