BAHAMAS International Womens Day recognizes women in rural communities

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, March 7, 2018 – Nassau -The Bahamas will focus on women and girls who live in the remote areas of the archipelago, namely the Family Island Communities, in celebration of International Women’s Day, March 8, 2018.The Minister of Social Services and Urban Development, the Hon. Lanisha Rolle, encouraged Bahamians to assist and support women in strengthening their communities, to help to build families and country. Related Items: She said women in rural communities have endured devastating damages as a result of natural disasters, low employment opportunities, limited weekly air and sea travel to and from islands and more.“Despite these challenges, the women in these communities have been resilient and strong. Many of them have managed to eke out a livelihood through sheer grit and determination, using the natural resources around them to become skilled in straw craft, farming, fishing and making preservatives.  As a result, they have been able to sustain their families and remain in their communities,” she said. Minister Rolle saluted the women of the Family Islands, The Bahamas and around the world.A Women’s Forum on Thursday, March 8 at Harry C. Moore Auditorium will address the topic, “Challenges and Opportunities in Achieving Gender Equality and Empowerment of Rural Women and Girls.” A special video documentary showcasing the determination of women and girls in rural communities in The Bahamas and sponsored by the Department of Gender and Family Affairs will be aired on ZNS TV.By: Kathryn Campbell (BIS)Photo captions:Header: The Hon. Lanisha Rolle, Minister of Social Services and Urban Development, speaks about International Women’s Day 2018 (far right); Emma Foulkes, Deputy Permanent Secretary (centre); and Coralee Adderley.Insert: Parliamentary Secretary the Hon. Vaughn Miller is shown first from left.BIS Photos/Derek Smithlast_img read more

Xbox One weekly game deals Best under 10

first_img Xbox One weekly game deals: Best under $10 Gaming deals: Titanfall 2 for $5, Red Dead Redemption for $10, GTA V for $20 and more Microsoft Microsoft has a number of Xbox One games on sale through March 18. Here’s a quick look at our top picks for sale titles that cost less than $10. To get these prices you’re not required to have a Xbox Live Gold membership.   Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of products featured on this page. $5  Metro Last Light Redux ($5)Metro 2033 Redux ($5)Star Wars Battlefront I Ultimate Edition ($5)Burnout Paradise ($5) $10 or less Battlefield 1 Revolution ($10)Mass Effect Andromeda ($9)NBA Live 19 All-Star Edition ($6)Star Wars Battlefront II ($6.25)Unravel 2 ($6)See the complete list of Xbox games on sale this week. This story was originally published on March 12. 0 Share your voice Tags Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Video Games More game deals Post a commentlast_img read more

Ancient shrimp monster not so fierce after all

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Anomalocaris was a meter-long shrimp-like creature with lobed wings that lived around 500 million years ago. It is often illustrated in the act of devouring trilobites or other shelled animals, and has been dubbed the first “super predator” because of its supposed ability to swoop down and attack trilobites on the sea bed.Researchers from the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, led by paleontologist James “Whitey” Hagadorn, reconstructed the mouth parts of Anomalocaris by examining 400 fossils and selecting the best specimens and feeding their data into a 3D computer model. They also reconstructed 12 groups of trilobites of various kinds, modeling their shell strength on modern day lobster and crab shells. Hagadorn said the group tried to model the full range of shapes and sizes of prey and predator mouth parts.The computer model enabled them to test how much force the animal could generate with its bite. The results showed Anomalocaris’ armored mouth parts would break before adult trilobite shells did, the feelers were inflexible, and their mouths could not fully close. The fossils also suggested the teeth were actually flexible protrusions and the mouth parts were able to fold, which would not have been possible if their mouth parts were hard.Hagadorn said there was also no positive evidence of trilobite or other crushed shells within fossil feces or gut contents, and no evidence of the broken or chipped mouth parts that would be expected in a shell-crunching predator. The findings of the research suggest it was extremely unlikely Anomalocaris could have eaten most trilobites.Trilobite fossils have been found that appear to have scars or bite marks resembling Anomalocaris’ bite, but Hagadorn suggested the creatures possibly “ingested things and then spit them out,” but did not eat the trilobites.Hagadorn said the most likely diet of Anomalocaris was similar to that of modern arthropods such as crabs, lobsters and shrimps, which mostly eat soft items such as worms in the mud or microorganisms or plankton in the water. It could have eaten very small trilobites and recently molted trilobites whose new shells had not yet hardened, but the vast majority of trilobites would have broken Anomalocaris’ mouth parts.He stressed there is no positive evidence of Anomalocaris’ diet, but said this is not surprising because in the fossil record “mushed-up” worms, phytoplankton or snails are “all going to look like mush.”The results of the research were presented on 1 November at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver, Colorado. (PhysOrg.com) — A Cambrian sea creature, Anomalocaris Canadensis, had long been thought to be a fearsome predator of trilobites, equipped as it was with barbed feelers and an armor-plated mouth, but new research suggests it was incapable of eating adult trilobites and probably survived by dining on “mush.” © 2010 PhysOrg.comcenter_img First great predator not much of one at all Citation: Ancient shrimp monster not so fierce after all (2010, November 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-ancient-shrimp-monster-fierce.html Anomalocaris canadensis, the top predator from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale of British Columbia, pencil drawing, digital coloring. The “tail fins” in this reconstruction should be placed ventrally (on top of the organism), and not at the rear as illustrated. Image: Nobu Tamura, via Wikipedia.last_img read more

Multinational effort underway to build synthetic yeast using artificial chromosomes

first_img ‘Synthetic’ chromosome permits repid, on-demand ‘evolution’ of yeast (Phys.org) —A multinational effort to replicate the genome of brewer’s yeast has been launched. Led by Professor Jef Boeke of John Hopkins University in Baltimore, and with teams in China, India, Great Britain and other countries, the goal of the effort is to build artificial chromosomes to replace the 16 normally found in yeast cells. If successful, the effort will mark the first time the entire genome of an organism with a nucleus has been artificially replicated. © 2013 Phys.org Sacharomyces cerevisiae cells in DIC microscopy. Credit: Wikipedia. Citation: Multinational effort underway to build synthetic yeast using artificial chromosomes (2013, July 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-07-multinational-effort-underway-synthetic-yeast.htmlcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Besides the possibility of providing new insights into how chromosomes work, the project hopes to also serve as a means of learning how to program an organism by altering its genetic functions. Yeast with artificial chromosomes, for example, could be programmed to serve as an engine to manufacture antibiotics, vaccines, biofuels, etc., instead of alcohol.A team of scientists successfully replaced the DNA of a bacteria cell back in 2010, but it had no nucleus, meaning it was a much simpler organism. Replicating all of the chromosomes in a yeast cell will require far more effort. For that reason, the work has been split between teams working at various facilities around the world. Each team will design one chromosome on a computer, which will then be sent to a central facility for its actual creation. Once all of the teams have built their chromosomes, a single yeast cell will be stripped of its natural chromosomes to be replaced by their artificial counterparts—giving it an entirely artificial genome. The project is expected to be expensive—the British team alone has received £1m from the U.K government to fulfill its part in the project which is expected to be completed by 2017.The yeast cell was picked for the project because it is a relatively simple organism—it’s one celled and has only 6000 genes. One the other hand, it’s sufficiently complex to further the science of bioengineering. Another plus is that yeast, because of its ability to convert sugars to alcohol, is seen as a becoming a more useful organism if its DNA could be controlled directly by creating new chromosomes in the lab and replacing the ones that nature gave it.last_img read more