Joanna Krupa Thanks Polish Military For Replacing Animals With Modern Simulators

first_imgPolish-born supermodel and Real Housewives of Miami star Joanna Krupa has just sent a letter to Poland Minister of National Defence Tomasz Siemoniak congratulating him for replacing the use of animals in all military medical training exercises with modern simulators after discussions with PETA and its international affiliates.“I am proud that my home country recognizes that the lives of animals matter and that there are more humane and effective ways to teach people how to perform lifesaving medical treatments than by hurting animals”, Krupa writes. “I know that the momentum created by Poland’s progressive example will encourage the five remaining NATO countries — Canada, Denmark, Norway, the U.K., and the U.S. — that still shoot, stab, burn, and kill animals in their military training drills to modernize their practices.”Polish military officials cited information about the benefits of simulation technology provided by PETA and protest letters from supporters of PETA and its international affiliates as the motivation behind the shift. Studies show that medical-care providers who learn trauma treatment using life-like simulators that replicate human anatomy and physiology are better prepared to treat people than those who are trained by cutting into animals who have been shot and dismembered.Poland’s decision means that more than 80 per cent of NATO nations are now training service members without harming any animals, leaving only a handful of countries, including the UK, still using animals.last_img read more

McMichael Canadian Art Collection bets big on past for 50th anniversary

first_img Login/Register With: A 50th anniversary is a big deal for a cultural institution. There’s enough history to celebrate, consider and, in some instances, reconsider. There’s the opportunity to refresh the institution’s profile and evaluate its position within contemporary art discourse. It’s an occasion, too, to strategize, to wonder, “Now what? Sure, we’ve made it this far – but what needs to be done to ensure another half-century?”The McMichael Canadian Art Collection is in the midst of just such a rumination – an exercise brought into even sharper focus last week when the famous woodsy gallery here, 40 kilometres northwest of Toronto, named British museum professional Ian Dejardin as its new director and chief executive officer. Lest we forget, it was 50 years ago this summer that the McMichael first opened its doors to the public as a Crown corporation of the province of Ontario. The deal that, on paper at least, transformed the McMichael from the fiefdom of founders Robert and Signe McMichael into a public trust had been reached in November, 1965. However, extensive and expensive renovations to the site meant that its roughly 200 artworks weren’t ready for their close-up until July.Alexander Young Jackson, October Morning, Algoma, 1920. (Toni Hafkenscheid/ University of Toronto Purchased by the Hart House Art Committee 1931/32) Advertisement Facebook Called, initially, the McMichael Conservation Collection of Art, the “collection” referenced in the moniker was unashamedly Canadian. Or at least unashamedly Canuck in its devotion to art of a particular ilk, namely oil sketches, drawings and paintings by the Group of Seven, Emily Carr and their contemporaries and followers, plus work by First Nations artists. Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more