Ex-49ers safety Eric Reid on NFL drug testing: It just doesn’t add up

first_imgClick here if you’re having trouble viewing the videos below on a mobile device.No sooner had former 49ers safety Eric Reid found a taker for his services this season than he began to complain he was being targeted by the NFL’s drug-testing gendarmes.By Reid’s count, he was tested seven times in 11 weeks. “That has to be statistically impossible,” he said. “I’m not a mathematician, but there’s no way that’s right.” (The NFL tests for banned drugs because it has never been able to otherwise …last_img read more

A Media Bias Sampler

first_imgSupport for conservatism in secular science media is as rare as a true transitional form in the fossil record.Whenever mainstream journals or leading science news sites touch on political or philosophical issues, the slant is predictable. Conservative positions will be discredited, explained away, or mocked—that is, if they are mentioned at all. Recent examples below.Three cheers for atheism. On Live Science, Clara Moskowitz gives a pulpit to atheist Sean Carroll of Caltech to explain his views on meaning in nature in a “Godless Universe,” helping him sell his new book on cosmological naturalism, The Big Picture, in the process. Barry Loewer also gives Carroll good press at Science Magazine. “He sets out to show how various phenomena, including thought, choice, conscioussness, and value, hang together with the scientific account of reality that has been developed in physics in the past 100 years,” Loewer swoons. “He attempts to do all this without relying on specialized jargon from philosophy and physics, and succeeds spectacularly in achieving both aims.”Whitewashing history: Sigmund Freud has a largely bad reputation in science. He invented words and concepts that have not stood the test of time; his methods were unscientific if not fraudulent; and his practice of “psychoanalysis” abused women by calling them “hysterical” as if that diagnosis had any meaning. Nevertheless, perhaps because he was a staunch follower of Darwin, he got kid gloves treatment in Live Science by Alina Bradford, who only mentioned that his ideas are “controversial.” She gives the last word to a Freudian.Obamacare: Watch a conservative video about six broken promises of Obamacare. Then read a Medical Xpress report claiming that doctors want more of it. One group of doctors wants to take this system, built on lies and promises that didn’t come true, and extend it into a single-payer system managed by government (i.e., socialized medicine)—something conservatives warned was the ulterior motive from the start. The article quotes an editorial by one side but no rebuttal from any conservative leader. The article mentions socialist Bernie Sanders favorably.Toying with embryos: Now that researchers kept a human embryo alive in a petri dish for 13 days, secular scientists want to extend the internationally-accepted limit of 14 days. Nature is leading the charge with “Revisit the 14-day rule.” In another Nature piece, David Cyranoski points out that “Stem-cell scientists attempt to fend off the need for government regulation that could impede research.” Scientists want to regulate themselves, but ethics gets short shrift.Assisted suicide: Is California ready for physician-assisted suicide? Medical Xpress calmly discusses the new law about to go into effect June 9. The focus of the article is allaying fears that the law might be misused. At Evolution News & Views, however, Wesley J. Smith, speaking from long experience, warns that “the culture of death brooks no dissent.”Spanking: Views on corporal punishment of children differ among conservatives, but one can be sure liberals will always portray it as child abuse, no matter what Solomon said about discipline with the rod. Science Daily‘s coverage is a case in point: “Risks of harm from spanking confirmed by analysis of 5 decades of research.” Who did the research? Evolutionary psychologists.Reductionist values: What is love? Just a chemical reaction with survival value brought about by natural selection, say evolutionists. Human love differs only in amount, not in kind, perhaps. That’s the view promulgated on The Conversation by evolutionary psychologist Gayle Brewer, whose headline postures her as an authority figure: “What is love? Here’s the science.” It’s not a many-splendored thing in her view. She enters her just-so story trance: “Romantic love may serve an important evolutionary function, for example by increasing the level of parental support available to subsequent children.”_______________In considering leftist viewpoints, it’s important to look back at where they led in history. National Geographic published “long-hidden photos of China’s Cultural Revolution” taken by a brave photographer.Photographer Li Zhensheng had a unique view of China’s Cultural Revolution—a chaotic period of purging and punishment that began on May 16, 1966, and lasted in different phases until Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong’s death 10 years later.Li was working for a newspaper in Heilongjiang Province at the time, and the job allowed him to take state-approved pictures of Mao’s campaign without fear of harassment. He later hid the negatives under his floorboards in case government officials ever came looking for him. And they did. In 1968, the government accused him of “counterrevolutionary” activities and raided his apartment.If officials had found the negatives, they likely would have destroyed them. But the images remained hidden under the floorboards, and Li continued to protect them through the years. Today, his remarkable photos have toured the world and been published in a book.Here, we present mosaics of Li’s images, which show the incredible scale of the Cultural Revolution.The photos are haunting: peasants en masse paying homage to the powerful image of Mao, hoping for an improvement in their poverty, while knowing that failing to show enthusiastic support could mean imprisonment or death. One caption quietly mentions, “Millions of people were killed, injured, or imprisoned during the revolution” — 77 million, to be precise (see 11/30/05).Nazism is sometimes portrayed as right-wing, but in actuality, Hitler’s big-government, totalitarian state had more in common with communist dictatorships than with anything resembling American values (capitalism, liberty, natural rights and limited government). Stephanie Pappas at Live Science continues that distortion in her piece on “How Adolf Hitler Rose to Power and Seduced Germany.” She also fails to mention his devotion to Darwin, which historian Richard Weikart has documented in detail. Instead of focusing on the ideas that motivated him, Pappas portrays him as an obscure person whose rise to power was almost determined by political circumstances. What he did to millions of people, though, is a matter of historical record. Hitler is the epitome of evil to the modern western mind. You won’t find the word in her article.If you can provide examples of secular scientists promoting conservative values, we’ll be happy to share them. The exceptions prove the rule: week after week, we find secular news services portraying scientists and their reporters as objective truth seekers, but it’s only a mask for leftist ideology. Darwin leads to denial of God (and objective moral standards). That leads to materialism, atheism, moral relativism, leftism, utopianism, oppressive government, and ultimately, to serfdom and even democide.If one believes we are made in the image of God, endowed with unalienable rights, accountable to a Creator, with a purpose on earth to love God and our neighbor as ourselves, yet knows we are each fallen and in need of redemption, the difference in worldview could hardly be more opposite. A steady diet of mainstream media can lead to a highly distorted view of the world.Thank goodness the internet has opened up channels for news and views censored by the mainstream media. Here are a couple of daily podcasts we can recommend: ID the Future from the Discovery Institute, Washington Watch from the Family Research Council, The Briefing by Al Mohler. I listen to these on my daily health walks. For conservative news, you might check out WND and Breitbart News. (Visited 33 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Tottenham facing up to reality check as stadium costs escalate

first_imgShare on LinkedIn Sign up to The Recap, our weekly email of editors’ picks. Mauricio Pochettino has expressed the belief on several occasions. When Tottenham Hotspur move into their 62,062-seat stadium next season, the club will enter a new era of financial power. “It would be the time to say: ‘Now, we will win the title,’” the manager said in December. The theory has been that the stadium’s increased revenues will help the club to attract and keep the A-list players.The view has sat uncomfortably with the cost of construction. It seems a long time ago that £400m was the ballpark figure. Then, it became £750m and £850m, and now, nobody would be surprised if it reached a billion. Tottenham have taken out £400m in bank loans, which are repayable over a five-year period. This month they announced in their financial results for the year ended 30 June 2017 that the “cumulative spend” on the project had increased from £115.3m to £315.1m. The club’s profits were robust. They stood at £41.2m after interest and tax. But whichever way you dress it up, there is a lot of money to find. It is no wonder chairman Daniel Levy “struggles to sleep at night”, according to Pochettino. The penny – or great mountains of them – appears to have dropped with Pochettino and when he addressed the press, before Monday’s game against Watford at Wembley, there was a shift in his stance.“The move to the new stadium is not suddenly going to change everything and millions of pounds will rain from the sky,” Pochettino said. “You have to manage and know exactly the expectations. It will be important to review and set the principles again; how it will be with the team once we move.”Pochettino’s comments felt significant, just like the ones he made after the FA Cup semi defeat against Manchester United. In four post-match interviews he used the same phrase. The club needed more time to achieve success, he said, and it would be “with me or another” manager.Pochettino was asked for clarification and explained Tottenham’s project was fixed so strongly for the long term it was inevitable another manager would one day take over the responsibility. His contract runs for a further three years. The project is designed for many more.It remains difficult to escape the impression that Pochettino is approaching a crossroads. He has urged Levy on more than one occasion to move quickly in this summer’s transfer market while he ignored a question about whether he would lead the club into the new stadium and, instead, answered one of his own – the classic politician’s trick. “If I stay here for three more years, the project will not change,” Pochettino said. “We cannot change because the club cannot change. Whether it is me or another, that is the right project to keep pushing. Tottenham Hotspur Mauricio Pochettino: ‘The move to the new stadium is not suddenly going to change everything and millions of pounds will rain from the sky.’ Photograph: Tottenham Hotspur FC/Getty Images “We are the victims of our own success because we are ahead in our project. It’s not easy to accept being close [to a trophy] and being disappointed. The easy thing is give up and say we need to change everything. No. We need to keep going. You have to keep dreaming.”The supporters’ fear is that Pochettino will be prised away. The good news for them is that PSG are likely to replace Unai Emery with Thomas Tuchel while Real Madrid will surely not dispense with Zinedine Zidane if, as expected, he takes them to a third successive Champions League final.But Pochettino has seen the future at Tottenham with clarity. The new stadium will change little for him. His transfer dealings since his arrival in the summer of 2014 have shown a net spend on permanent fees of £40.25m – a remarkably low figure – and he will continue to have to sell in order to buy; to keep the books balanced.Meanwhile the Manchester clubs, in particular, will carry on splurging. At what point does that get to Pochettino – a manager whose stated ambition is to win the Premier League title? Share on Twitter Topics Mauricio Pochettino Read more Tottenham remain in a curiously hemmed-in position with regard to strengthening the squad. Last summer they sold Kyle Walker to Manchester City for an initial £50m to fund purchases that would make the collective stronger and this time they are expected to do something similar. Toby Alderweireld is for sale while they would listen to offers for Danny Rose and, surprisingly, Mousa Dembélé.However, the incoming signings would have to fit into Levy’s wage structure, which is capped at a basic £100,000 a week, although not for him. He earned £6m, including bonuses, equating to £115,000 a week, in the year covered by the most recent accounts.It will be difficult to find too many players who would improve Pochettino’s best XI and be happy to sign for, say, £60,000 to £70,000 a week, which is the threshold for many of his starters.One example is Wilfried Zaha, who earns more than £120,000 a week at Crystal Palace. A deal for the winger would be complicated on many levels, not least in terms of the impact it would have on existing squad harmony, which Pochettino has fostered expertly.Will Levy raise the wage ceiling? Yes, although not to market rates. In other words, the club’s stars could get more elsewhere, if they could get out – which is a big if under Levy.Are Tottenham stronger without Walker or, indeed, Alderweireld, who has been marginalised? One thing can be said for certain and it is that the club’s players have noted with interest how Walker has trebled his salary at City and won the title. Could they do one or both at Tottenham? For Pochettino, the balancing act does not get any easier. Share on Messengercenter_img Tottenham Hotspur v Watford: match preview Premier League features Share on Facebook Facebook Share via Email Twitter Share on WhatsApp Pinterest Share on Pinterest Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Are Pro Wrestlers Dying at an Unusual Rate

I was barely 13 years old during WrestleMania VI on April 1, 1990, and just about at the height of my pro-wrestling fandom. I watched every televised event and read wrestling magazines, and I had been to a live event at the Blaisdell Arena in Honolulu. I even watched unofficial wrestling-analysis shows that aired in the middle of the night. I was delirious.My favorite wrestler was Brutus “The Barber” Beefcake, who took on “Mr. Perfect,” who had yet to lose in a televised head-to-head matchup. Brutus won. “Mr. Perfect,” a.k.a. Curt Hennig, had finally lost.Hennig died in 2003 at age 44.Of course, the main event at WrestleMania VI was the “Ultimate Challenge,” in which The Ultimate Warrior defeated Hulk Hogan to unify the Intercontinental Championship and the WWF Championship for the first — and so far only — time ever (the WWF changed its name to the WWE in 2002).The Ultimate Warrior, James Hellwig, died two weeks ago at age 54.Here are a few other pieces of information about WrestleMania VI:One match — Earthquake’s defeat of Hercules — featured two wrestlers who are now both dead.It was Andre the Giant’s last major televised match; he died in 1993 at age 46.Dusty Rhodes, who won his first wrestling title in 1968, is 68. His tag-team partner, Sapphire, his opponents “Macho Man” Randy Savage and the Sensational Queen Sherri, and his surprise manager, Miss Elizabeth (who was in a “feud” with Macho Man, her real-life husband), died in 1996, 2011, 2007 and 2003, respectively.Just five of 14 matches featured wrestlers who are all alive today.Here’s the card with all of the televised matches for the night. I’ve marked the ones who are dead in red; it’s one-third of the wrestlers who appeared (12 of 36, plus Miss Elizabeth).For all the dramatized bloodshed of professional wrestling, the card for WrestleMania VI certainly looks like a bloodbath. Is there anything fishy about pro wrestling, or are my intuitions about what percentage of young 1990s athletes should be alive 25 years later just way off?Let’s look at some data.I collected biographical information (including date of birth and date of death, if applicable) from the Internet Wrestling Database on all WWF wrestlers who are/would be younger than 60 in 2014, and who had at least 20 pay-per-view appearances between WrestleMania I in 1985 and the time the WWF was forced to change its name by the World Wildlife Fund in 2002 — for 203 in all.I then calculated each wrestler’s chances of dying between the ages of 25 (roughly around when his or her career may have started) and however old he or she is/would be in 2014, using actuarial tables from the Social Security Administration. Because health technology has improved significantly, I used a 1990 actuarial table to cover years before 2000, a 2000 table to cover years 2000 to 2009, and a 2010 table to cover 2010 to the present.I then broke them down by age groups and compared each group’s death rate with its expected death rate:We can also calculate the probability of so many wrestlers dying in each age group and overall by chance (using binom.dist), and it comes out like so:Note: I calculated each wrestler’s odds individually, but the probabilities in the last column of this table are based on the average probability for each group (which gets us extremely close, though technically it could be calculated precisely).I don’t want to speculate as to the cause of this phenomenon, though a number of theories in varying shades of sinister spring to mind. But it saddens me to think that my 13-year old self was so thoroughly entertained by watching ghosts. Rest in peace. read more

Which Positions Teams Valued Most in the 2014 NFL Draft

The first pick of this year’s NFL Draft, Jadeveon Clowney, is a defensive end, and his selection marks the first time since 2006 that a defensive player was taken No. 1 overall. But does that mean teams put more emphasis on defensive prospects as a whole this year? And while we’re at it, how much did they invest in each position?We can begin to answer these questions by looking at how many Jimmy Johnson draft-value-chart points teams devoted to each position (3,000 points for the top pick, 2,600 for the second, etc.). “The Chart,” as it’s affectionately known in NFL circles, isn’t a very good gauge of the relative value of each draft spot, but that’s mainly because NFL general managers tend to overvalue the right to pick early. Research on draft-day trades has shown The Chart does a great job of describing how valuable teams perceive each slot to be, which is a more relevant shade of meaning for our questions anyway.As it turns out, while Clowney and the 3,000 draft points the Houston Texans spent on him were a feather in the cap for defense, teams spent the majority of their draft points on the other side of the ball this year. Specifically, they used 52.9 percent of points on players listed at offensive positions, 47.1 percent on defenders and 0.03 percent (21.1 draft points) on punters and kickers.How do those proportions compare to other drafts? Well, last year, the numbers were flipped: 52.2 percent of draft points were devoted to defense, 47.6 to offense and 0.2 percent to specialists. The long-term tendency, though, is somewhere in between. Over the last 10 years’ worth of drafts, the average NFL team spent 50.3 percent of its draft points on offense, 49.3 on defense and 0.3 percent on special teamers. Here’s what that looks like graphically:Positionally, you might think this was a big year for defensive linemen, given Clowney’s top billing. But overall, defensive linemen received only 17.7 percent of all draft points, 3 percent below the position’s overall 2004 to 2014 average of 20.7 percent. (Meanwhile, their counterparts on the offensive line were up 3.4 percentage points to 20.5 percent.) Quarterbacks were also down 1.8 percent compared to their long-term average, and running backs had a 3.9 percent shortfall. The big winners of this year’s draft, then, appear to be pass-catchers: Teams spent 3.5 percent more on wide receivers and 1.3 percent more on tight ends than those positions’ usual distribution.Here’s the summary of the percentage of draft points spent on each position over the last 10 years of drafts:These long-term percentages can also give us an idea of how general managers tend to value positions relative to one another, but we need to adjust for how many players in each position are typically on the field at any given time — something we can do thanks to Pro Football Focus’s snap counts. Armed with that data, I computed an “index” of how important teams seem to consider a given position (given the amount of draft investment in it) relative to the average player on the same side of the ball.Teams spent 15.2 percent of their points on running backs over the past decade, despite running backs only making up, on average, 1.3 of the 11 offensive players (11.8 percent) on the field for any given snap. Running backs have an index of 128, then — meaning teams used 28 percent more draft points on them than we’d expect.This metric is far from perfect — the draft is a fundamentally forward-looking endeavor, while the snap counts are retrospective and track an entirely different set of players — but it provides a good reference point when comparing this year’s draft to the long-term valuation of each position. read more

Ameryst Alstons 4th 30point game of season leads Ohio State past Northwestern

Sophomore guard Ameryst Alston sets up for a free throw during a game against Penn State Feb. 23 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 71-62.Credit: Ritika Shah / Asst. photo editorThe Ohio State women’s basketball team came into Indianapolis having never lost a first round game in the Big Ten tournament.That trend continued with an impressive 86-77 victory against the No. 9 seed Northwestern Wildcats (15-15, 5-11) Thursday.The Buckeyes (16-17, 5-11) were once again led by first team All-Big Ten sophomore guard Ameryst Alston, who poured in a game-high 30 points. It was the fourth time she has reached the 30-point mark this season and the second time she has done so against the Wildcats — the other being during a 71-62 victory Feb. 23.OSU coach Kevin McGuff, whose career record improved to 18-7 in conference tournaments, had plenty of praise to give his star guard.“She is a really special player and a great kid and she was just so aggressive,” McGuff said in a post-game interview with the Big Ten Network’s Shelley Tills. “She is really hard to contain off the dribble and got to the rim all night.”Alston, who scored 20 of her 30 points in the second half, said it wasn’t just her doing.“I have to thank my teammates for that,” Alston said to the Big Ten Network’s Katie Witham on her 30-point performance. “They gave me the ball at the right times and the right places.”OSU also received two double-double performances from senior center Darryce Moore and senior forward Martina Ellerbe. Moore, despite fouling out, finished one point shy of her career-high as she recorded 19 points and 10 rebounds. Ellerbe tallied a career-high in rebounds, pulling down 13 boards to go along with 16 points.“Our players stayed relentless,” McGuff said. “We were really aggressive, especially in the second half.”The Buckeyes jumped out to an early lead before the Wildcats ended the first half on a 16-0 run to take a 39-35 lead into the half, culminated by a buzzer-beating 3-point shot by freshman forward Nia Coffey.Northwestern coach Jim McKeown said at the half he was happy with the way his team was playing.“We played better defense, we got out and ran and got better shots,” McKeown said.The Wildcats had four players score in double-figures, including 17 from Coffey, who also grabbed 11 rebounds. Sophomore guard Maggie Lyon recorded a team-high 23 points, on 6-18 shooting for the Wildcats in the loss.The Buckeyes will now turn their attention to the No. 1-seeded and regular season Big Ten conference champion Penn State Nittany Lions (22-6, 13-3) who defeated OSU in both regular season meetings — outscoring the Buckeyes 140-96 in the two games combined.Although OSU has not had success against the Nittany Lions this season, McGuff said his team will be ready to go Friday afternoon.“I am happy we won this one but we are going to quickly turn the page to Penn State,” McGuff said. “They have a great team, they are very well-coached, so we will have to be on our A-game tomorrow, but we are going to show up ready to play.”In order to pull the upset against Penn State, Alston said the Buckeyes will need to come out with the same intensity they had against the Wildcats.“We are going to take the energy from this game and take it to the next game,” Alston said. “We have to win the boards and that is what happened today, getting second chance shots.”“We don’t want to go home.”The Buckeyes and Nittany Lions are scheduled for a noon tipoff Friday at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. read more

Ryan Day and Greg Schiano become Ohio States first 1 million assistant

Ohio State announced Ryan Day, along with Greg Schiano, will become the first million-dollar assistant coaches in Ohio State football history on Feb. 14. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorAfter paying $700,000 in base salary for its highest-paid assistant coach last season, Ohio State will pay two assistant coaches — associate head coach and defensive coordinator Greg Schiano and offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Ryan Day — at least $1 million in 2018, the university announced Wednesday. Schiano earned more money than any other Buckeye assistant coach last season and will remain the highest-paid assistant, earning $1.5 million next season in base salary on a one-year deal. His $800,000 raise is a larger sum of money than his 2017 base salary of $700,000. Schiano had been pursued by teams in the NFL as an assistant coach and in the NCAA as a head coach.Day, who was promoted from co-offensive coordinator to offensive coordinator after the season, will earn a $1 million base salary next season. He signed a three-year deal, according to Ohio State.Ohio State co offensive coordinator Greg Schiano (middle, in red), leads into the air after the Buckeyes beat Penn State 39-38 on Oct. 28 at Ohio Stadium. Credit: Ashley Nelson | Station Manager“The reality is we have to compensate people consistent with the expectations and their performance,” Athletics Director Gene Smith said last week. Ohio State anticipates all 10 assistant coaches will be in the top-three in base salary in the Big Ten at their respective positions, according to a release.Every other returning assistant coach, except for linebackers coach Bill Davis, will receive raises. Davis, who earned $500,000 in his first season as an Ohio State coach, will be paid the same amount in 2018.Offensive coordinator and tight ends coach Kevin Wilson earned a $150,000 raise and will make $800,000 next season. He will have the third-highest base salary of the program’s 10 assistant coaches. Defensive line coach Larry Johnson’s base salary will increase from $575,225 to $750,000 in 2018, making him the fourth-highest paid Ohio State assistant coach. Former Washington State defensive coordinator Alex Grinch was hired as a defensive assistant coach and will have an $800,000 base salary next year. His specific role as an assistant has not been announced. Taver Johnson was hired Tuesday as Ohio State’s cornerbacks coach and will make $345,000 in base salary.In 2018, running backs coach Tony Alford will make $525,000, which is $75,000 more than he made last season. Offensive line coach Greg Studrawa will receive a $90,000 pay bump to raise his base salary to $500,000.Wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator Zach Smith received a $40,000 raise, but will be the lowest-paid assistant coach, making $340,000. He is the only remaining member of Urban Meyer’s first staff at Ohio State.The Lantern requested contracts of each assistant coach, but has yet to receive the documents, which will include bonuses, supplemental income and other amenities. read more

Football Ohio State releases depth chart for Oregon State game

Sophomore defensive lineman Jonathon Cooper (18) during the Ohio State vs. UNLV game on Sept. 23. Ohio State beat UNLV 54-21. Credit: Ris Twigg | Former Assistant Photo EditorThe first depth chart of the season was released by Ohio State prior to the season opener against Oregon State.Notable starters include sophomore safety Isaiah Pryor, who acting head coach Ryan Day said was battling with redshirt sophomore Jahsen Wint for the starting position, but has the sole starting position in the safety position opposite junior captain Jordan Fuller.Day also labeled sophomore tight end Luke Farrell as starter, but is marked as a co-starter with redshirt junior Rashod Berry on the depth chart.Junior wide receiver Austin Mack is listed as the starter, with redshirt senior and captain Terry McLaurin at the No. 2 position.Redshirt senior and captain Parris Campbell is listed as an H-Back on the depth chart, along with redshirt junior K.J. Hill and senior C.J. Saunders.At running back, sophomore J.K. Dobbins and redshirt junior Mike Weber are listed as co-starters.On the defensive side, junior Jonathon Cooper and sophomore Chase Young will be co-starters at defensive end alongside junior and captain Nick Bosa.Redshirt junior cornerback Damon Arnette earned the starting spot over sophomore Jeffrey Okudah, though defensive coordinator Greg Schiano said they will rotate.Saunders and redshirt sophomore Demario McCall will be splitting punt returns, and McCall will be doing kick returns with redshirt senior Johnnie Dixon.Freshmen on the depth chart include right tackle Nicholas Petit-Frere, tight end Jeremy Ruckert, Brian Snead and Master Teague at running back, wide receiver Chris Olave, Tyreke Smith and Tyler Friday at defensive end, Taron Vincent and Tommy Togiai at defensive tackle and safety Josh Proctor.Ohio State will play Oregon State on Sept. 1 at 12 p.m. at Ohio Stadium. read more

Man Convicted of Killing Son Arrested in Death of Girlfriends Baby

first_imgBy Michelle Richardson, Special to the AFROA man who once spent time in prison for the death of his own son, has been arrested for the murder of his girlfriends 18-month-old child; one of two children who died of murder on consecutive days (the other was seven-year old Taylor Hayes), in Baltimore.Francois Browne, 35, was taken into custody July 20 and charged with first degree murder, according to the Baltimore Police Department (BPD).Francois Browne, 35, was taken into custody July 20 and charged with the murder of his girlfriend’s 18-month-old baby. He spent three years in prison after being charged in the death of his son in 2012. (Courtesy Photo)According to police, Emergency Medical Services responded to the 2800 block of Forest Glen Road in West Baltimore on July 18, at approximately 9:30 p.m. for a report of an unconscious and unresponsive child. Zaray Gray was in the care of Browne at the time when his mother arrived home and found him not breathing. The baby was transported to Sinai Hospital where he was pronounced dead.According to police, doctors at the hospital told detectives that baby Zaray had visible injuries on his body and an X-ray confirmed at least one broken bone. In 2012, Browne spent three years in prison for the death of his biological son, seven-month old Kendall Browne. According to court documents, Browne was alone with his son on New Year’s Eve when he told police he played with his son before they both fell asleep. Browne allegedly told police that when he awoke he found baby Kendall not breathing and that he attempted to perform CPR on the child.Baby Kendall spent several days on life support before he died and his death was the first homicide of 2013, said Baltimore Police. Court documents show he sustained severe head trauma, bleeding on the brain and fractured ribs.Browne was being held at Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center at press time.last_img read more

2019 Media Guide Now Available Online

first_img 2019 Media Guide LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The 2019 installment of the University of Louisville women’s lacrosse media guide is now available online in PDF form.  The guide contains full roster, schedule, statistics, the UofL record book and a history of the Louisville program.The Cardinals begin the second season of the Scott Teeter era when they open at Northwestern on Friday at 8 p.m.For the latest information on Louisville lacrosse, visit GoCards.com, or follow the team’s Twitter account at @LouisvilleLax or on Facebook at facebook.com/UofLLacrosse.Print Friendly Version Story Linkslast_img read more