British Royals touch down in SA

first_img3 November 2011The Prince of Wales, Prince Charles, and the Duchess of Cornwall, Camilla Rosemary, arrived in South Africa on Wednesday afternoon for a four-day visit at the personal invitation of President Jacob Zuma.The Prince was greeted by a military guard of honour – and a stunning amber sunset – as he touched down under blue skies at Waterkloof Air Force Base near Pretoria on Wednesday.His Royal Highness was met on arrival by British High Commissioner in South Africa Nicola Brewer, who introduced him to South African Defence Minister Lindiwe Sisulu and South Africa’s Chief of State Protocol Vusi Bruce KolwaneThe Duchess arrived separately in Johannesburg on Wednesday morning. Together, the royal couple will attend engagements in Pretoria, Johannesburg, Kwazulu-Natal and Cape Town before leaving after a church service on Sunday.The royal tour will go to townships, community programmes, a nature reserve and sustainability projects, giving special attention to sustainability issues in the run-up to the UN Climate Change Conference taking place in Durban from 28 November.It will also focus on the issues of trade and investment, jobs and development, education and disadvantaged youth, and shared heritage and conservation of traditional livelihoods and wildlife, particularly the work of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). Prince Charles recently became president of WWF UK.The Prince will not be meeting President Jacob Zuma, who is attending the G20 Summit in Cannes, France.The Prince of Wales visited South Africa in 1997 when he introduced his son, Prince Harry, to southern Africa. His last official visit to Tanzania was in 1984.This is the Duchess of Cornwall’s first official visit to southern Africa, though she has visited privately. She has never visited Tanzania.SAinfo reporter BuaNewslast_img read more

Interview: Showtime Docuseries Cinematographer from The Trade

first_imgWe sat down with Matt Porwoll, one of the cinematographers behind The Trade to discuss making films about sensitive issues and working with Matt Heineman.All images via Our Time Projects/Showtime.The Showtime original series The Trade explores the global opioid epidemic and tells the stories of the people caught in its grip. Filming sensitive material and trying to leave a small production footprint were just some of the challenges facing this series. We talked with Matt Porwoll, one of cinematographers behind the show, about how he met these challenges and what it was like working with Matt Heineman.PremiumBeat: How did you take your first leap into the documentary world?Matt Porwoll: When I was at film school, I had big hopes and dreams of shooting feature films. I didn’t want to do the low-budget indie market but wanted to kind of do the kind of standard Hollywood-type movies, and so I got a job at Abel Cine right out of school and started working a week after graduation. That was a perfect entry point into the New York market because, coming right out of film school, I was able to work with the most modern equipment and meet the camera assistants, the cinematographers, and the producers who were all working regularly in town. I think it was through that experience working with them that I started to get a better taste of kind of what the options were in the industry. That opened my eyes to documentary production, which I had never really paid any attention to.I mean, I didn’t even take the documentary production class in college. It just wasn’t on my radar, and so through building these packages, sending crews off to everywhere across the planet, shooting amazing stories, and coming back with great stories, that kind of shifted my attention to say this might be something that I could see myself doing for the long haul. So when I left Abel, two years later, and started freelancing as a camera assistant, I started working for all the documentary people. That’s how I fell into documentary production, and now I couldn’t ask for anything better.A scene from the SHOWTIME original documentary series THE TRADE (Season 1, Episode 01). – Photo: Our Time Projects/Courtesy of SHOWTIMEPB: Who was the first person to give you that big opportunity that eventually led to where you are now?MP: Well, I thankfully had the opportunity to assist a lot of really good documentary-specific cinematographers and people who have been doing this for many years. I was able to come in and learn from some of the best in the business. There were a few people in that realm who really kind of guided me. A big one was Wolfgang Held, who had done a lot of documentaries [and filmed things like] Metallica and a bunch of series with PBS and HBO. It was through Wolfgang that I first met Matt Heineman when they were starting to shoot Matt’s first film Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare — that was in 2010. I came on assisting Wolfgang on that film and then ended up shooting second camera.PB: I would say Matt Heineman is one of the most influential documentary filmmakers today. How’s that experience been?MP:  Yeah, it is exciting. It’s also exciting I think for both of us that we kind of came up in this together because we’re the same age. I was assisting and operating on his first film, and he’s someone who’s got incredible instincts. So even out of the gate, he made an incredible movie. Then the next film that we did was Cartel Land, and Matt asked me if I would be interested in shooting that with him, and I think for both of us it was like Okay, we’re kind of now going out on our own. We’ve been through this once before — let’s support each other again and do it again. I mean that was an incredible movie in so many ways, and really I think that’s what solidified in our mind the kind of movies we wanted to make, how we wanted to make them, and that we wanted to [work together] as often as possible to do these types of films.PB: You recently just shot the Showtime series The Trade with Matt. What was it like shooting vérité-style with heroin users? They’re doing something illegal, so it’s definitely sensitive material.MP: One thing that we very purposefully did on this film was we tried to limit our footprint as much as possible. It made everybody a lot more comfortable because we only had two people in the field per team. I had a producer, and it was just the two of us for the entire time. So through that consistency, where we weren’t changing out crew members every trip, we weren’t adding people, removing people. And so, I think through that there was a level of just comfort that we established pretty early on. Much of being a documentarian doesn’t really have a lot to do with the camera — it just has to do with how you present yourself and how you explain why you’re there and how you approach these difficult and delicate situations in a respectful way. We are people behind the camera, and we care for you, and we understand everything that you’re going through, and we just want to understand it more and share that with the audience. I think that motivated a lot of people. Especially with the families that we filmed.PB: What type of gear did you use to maintain this small footprint?MP: One thing that we really wanted to do was, again, in minimizing the footprint, to come up with style guides for the show. We focused on almost building a set of limitations to work within. Instead of bringing a bunch of gear and having every focal length and the perfect camera, we kind of focused on reining it all in and saying we’re only going to really have with us what we can carry without having to go back to the car. On all these storylines, you have to be flexible — you have to be ready to go. And so, we shot on the Canon C300 Mark II, which I’ve been working with since the day it came out. It’s really solidified itself as the perfect documentary camera: it’s small, it’s lightweight, it has incredible image quality, and it’s just flexible and ergonomic for documentary use. It doesn’t ever fight you — the last thing you want in a camera is having to spend time thinking about where a button is, how to access something, or having complicated menus.In terms of lenses, we basically told ourselves we would use the Canon 17-55mm, Canon 24-105, and the 70-200. It was mainly the 17-55 and the 24-105 that we had with us all the time. They are small, and they have between the two of them the perfect range — the 17 to 55 is a 2.8, which is great for low light, and the 24-105 is an f4, which is where we kind of set ourselves to shoot so that our subjects didn’t get lost in their environments. We also each had a Canon 24mm f/1.4 prime just because we knew between law enforcement and the addicts’ storylines, we would be in low light, so we had that one lens to cover us if exposure dropped. But the C300 is so good in low light that we didn’t really have to use it that much. For the most part, it’s probably 90% handheld except for some establishments.We started shooting everything in HD at 4×4 12-bit internal 1080p into the camera. We shot everything in CanonLog3. We shot that for a while, and then once we started to get more involved in Mexico and we had solidified the law enforcement team that we were going to be with, we ended up switching to shooting in 4k 422 10-bit for the purposes of having room to play if we needed to crop people out of the frame in post. But I feel like, again, with this camera, I think that’s kind of one of those big debates that keeps going around: resolution over color space, and I wholeheartedly agree that it’s probably better shooting in HD at 444 12-bit than it is to shoot 4k at 422 10-bit. Just having that flexibility for the color correction, especially on a project like this where you end up in all kinds of lighting situations and contrast situations, being able to have a smooth gradation in your color correction to shift your color balance: that’s great. However, the resolution of 4K certainly helped us in reframing and cropping people where necessary.PB: How do you feel documentary filmmaking is changing with this surge of episodic documentary content like The Trade?MP: Yeah, it’s incredible to watch, and this was my first foray into the episodic side of documentary filmmaking. We were very fortunate that Showtime allowed us to make this series as if we were making a film. The entire film was shot pretty much before it was edited. We had our editors come on certainly toward the tail end of production, but we did not have to shoot on the schedule of other documentary series where it’s episode by episode. We waited to see where the story was going to go, how it was going to develop, and what was going to happen with our characters before we made any final editorial decisions on any episode. And so, we just treated it as if we were making a five-hour film.PB: What advice do you have for aspiring documentarians?MP: Well, I think the biggest piece of advice that I can give to anyone is just shoot a lot and just involve yourself in any part of production. I think there’s now a big kind of push for people who are just starting out to jump out of film school or wherever and wanting to immediately start as cinematographers. I think that certainly has its opportunities and its value, but I think there’s a lot to be said learning from people who know what they’re doing better than you do. That journey will continue on forever; whether you’re assisting or you’re shooting, there’s always someone who’s going be doing it better than you, and that should be a guiding force as opposed to something that terrifies you. So, just take your time to learn the craft, working on productions and learning from your mistakes. Thankfully, especially in the documentary world, there are so many opportunities now between films and series and web, there’s a lot of work, and there’s a lot of stories to be told and the budgets are going up, the access is going up, the outlets and opportunities are going up. The biggest thing is make sure that you’re just focusing on the story first, and the craft will come around. Stick to the reasons that you got into telling good stories.Looking for more filmmaking interviews? Check these out.Interview: 7 Filmmaking Tips for Creating Retro ’80s ActionBehind The Scenes: Crafting The Stylized Naturalism of Bomb City with DP Jake WilganowskiThe Disaster Artist: Editing A Film About Making a FilmInterview: The Director and The Producer Behind “Man on Fire”Exclusive: Designing Wakanda and the Amazing Sets of Black Pantherlast_img read more

Archaeologists discover ancient petroglyph in Guanacaste

first_imgRelated posts:Thousands of pre-Columbian artifacts returning to Costa Rica Archaeologists: Ancient Site Holds Much More Indigenous cemetery uncovered in Tres Ríos U.S. museum to return indigenous artifacts Archaeologists of the state-run Costa Rican Electricity Institute (ICE) found an indigenous petroglyph — an image engraved on a rock — on the grounds of a geothermal project in the province of Guanacaste. The petroglyph is more than 1,000 years old.ICE experts found the artifact earlier this month on the banks of the Blanco River, inside a property of ICE’s Las Pailas II geothermal project in Liberia, the agency reported in a news release.They believe that the petroglyph belongs to the Bagaces Period, meaning it is from 300 to 800 A.D.Archaeologist Ana Cristina Hernández said they found evidence that the site, along with other areas within ICE’s project, were looted by tomb raiders.ICE officials set up a barbed wire fence to protect the area and prevent further unauthorized entrance.Ancient cemeteryThe artifact appeared in a sector that archaeologists believe is part of an indigenous cemetery complex.The petroglyph shows an image that experts say represents a hummingbird, a very important symbol for Costa Rica’s indigenous peoples. The bird was a symbol of fertility among local indigenous groups, they said.The rock also has two compound parallel spirals, placed in opposite directions. Experts say they represent the river flows and their relationship with burial sites located along the Blanco River.Archaeologist already unearthed and moved the rock for conservation and study with the help of experts from the National Museum, ICE confirmed.Arturo Hernández, an archaeologist from the Pailas II Project, said that the finding and relocation of the artifact is an important part of efforts to protect the indigenous legacy in teh area.“Above all, this is about protecting it from unscrupulous people who profit from the illicit trade of cultural property,” he said. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Limited awareness of diabetes hypertension in China remains a major public health

first_img Source:https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 25 2019Awareness and diagnoses of hypertension and diabetes in China has been limited, resulting in compromised treatment, and increased screening did not lead to significant improvements, according to a new study at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Findings are online in the journal BMC Public Health.Until now, there was little information on how individuals with hypertension or diabetes in China first became aware of their conditions and what factors may have contributed to changes in awareness over time.”It does not seem that the screening activities implemented by a national health survey improved awareness and management of these conditions. The persistent limited awareness of diabetes and hypertension remains a major public health concern,” said L.H. Lumey, MD, professor of Epidemiology.Using data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), researchers measured the impact of a screening program for people aged 45 years and older between 2011 and 2015. After 2011, study participants were re-interviewed every two years to monitor any changes over time in their health, economic, or social conditions. Physical examinations were repeated in 2013 and 2015, and participants were asked again if they had ever been diagnosed with hypertension, or diabetes. Over 80 percent of participants interviewed in 2011 continued to participate in 2015.Of the more than 11,000 people screened in 2011, 49 percent were identified with hypertension and 18 percent with diabetes by medical examinations. Over 80 percent of the middle-aged and elderly Chinese diagnosed with hypertension and/or diabetes in 2011 reported in 2015 that they were unaware of having the disease(s). Aware hypertension patients were more likely to be older women, live in urban areas, and have higher BMIs.Hypertension was defined as diastolic blood pressure of 90 mmHg or higher; a systolic blood pressure of 140?mmHg or higher; or both; or as currently using an anti-hypertensive medication. Diabetes was defined as a fasting plasma glucose level of 126?mg/dL or higher; an HbA1c concentration of 6.5 mg/dL or higher; or a self-report of doctor diagnosed diabetes.Related StoriesObese patients with Type 1 diabetes could safely receive robotic pancreas transplantDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesSome people treated for type 1 diabetes may have monogenic diabetes, study findsThere was some improvement in disease awareness between 2011 and 2015, mostly attributed to a medical examination initiated by the study participants themselves (over 75 percent), by their work unit or community (12-15 percent), but rarely (less than 3 percent) by the CHARLS examination. “One possible explanation is that the screening in the health survey was seen simply as an isolated process and not as a tool for follow-up, treatment, or referral,” noted Lumey.Several reasons could explain the limited increase in reported disease awareness in 2015, according to the researchers. Some participants may not have received the physical examination and blood test results from the 2011 survey; they may have not understood the results; or, they may have forgotten the results. “They also may have been unwilling to recognize that they had been diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension or failed to take appropriate measures for disease management,” said Lumey. “This will need further study.””While we observed an increase in hypertension and diabetes awareness over time in the CHARLS survey, our results suggest a ‘failure to act on the findings’, and raise important questions about the effective communication of screening results not only in CHARLS but also in other health surveys,” noted Chihua Li of Zhengzhou Central Hospital in China.”Perhaps individuals were expected to take actions by themselves after receiving the screening results,” said Lumey. “But our findings show it is important that increased efforts are made to make sure that participants understand the medical examination results and are motivated to access the appropriate health services where needed. Providing systematic feedback of screening results to survey participants and the monitoring of disease awareness over time will be essential to improve disease recognition and facilitate optimal management.”last_img read more

Staff fraud may cost Chinas DJI drone maker 150 million

first_img Citation: Staff fraud may cost China’s DJI drone maker $150 million (2019, January 21) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-staff-fraud-china-dji-drone.html A company spokeswoman said DJI has established a special anti-corruption group to conduct in-depth investigations Explore further Chinese drone maker DJI has placed 45 employees under investigation for alleged fraud that could cost the company more than one billion yuan ($150 million) in losses, the firm said Monday. Embattled GlaxoSmithKline hit with another fraud probecenter_img © 2019 AFP The world’s top civilian drone maker said in an internal memo that most of the employees involved in the fraud worked in the supply chain, and 29 were fired while 16 were reported to the police.The case is expected to involve more than 100 people and many people will be facing a sentence in jail, according to Friday’s memo, whose authenticity was confirmed by a company spokeswoman on Monday.The initial investigation is just “the tip of the iceberg,” the spokeswoman told AFP.The memo said the employees fraudulently inflated the prices of parts for personal financial gains.The staffers received kickbacks from suppliers that charged double or triple the price to sell parts to DJI, the memo said.A company spokeswoman said DJI has established a special anti-corruption group to conduct in-depth investigations.”DJI will not tolerate corruption because of the rapid development and will not stop its development because of corruption,” she told AFP.The company has become the latest in a string of Chinese tech firms dealing with internal misdeeds in recent months.China’s dominant ride-hailing firm Didi Chuxing uncovered more than 60 cases of corruption within the company last year.Yang Weidong, former president of Alibaba’s video-streaming platform Youku, stepped down and was put under investigation in December on suspicion of accepting improper payments, according to Chinese media. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Practice holding broom in private before next photo op Omar Abdullah to

first_img Press Trust of India SrinagarJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 17:54 IST Omar Abdullah said Parliament complex was one of the cleanest places in the country.National Conference leader Omar Abdullah on Saturday mocked the cleanliness drive at the Parliament complex, saying it was one of the cleanest places in the country.The former Jammu and Kashmir chief minister was responding to a Swachh Bharat programme held inside the Parliament complex in which several BJP MPs, including actor-turned-politician Hema Malini, could be seen wielding a broom.”But the Parliament complex is one of the cleanest places in the country, especially when the sessions are on, so what were they sweeping?” Abdullah, a three-time member of the Lok Sabha, tweeted.A short video of the Bollywood actor cleaning a road inside the complex came in for severe criticism on social media as the broom of the Mathura MP was not even touching the ground as she swept.”Ma’am please practice how to wield the (broom) in private before your next photo op,” Abdullah tweeted. “This technique you’ve employed won’t contribute much to improving cleanliness in Mathura (or anywhere else for that matter).”Pre-empting any criticism, the NC vice-president said: “I knew sweeping the dormitories in Sanawar (Himachal Pradesh) would be useful for something. I’m now qualified to comment on the (sweeping) technique of others.”ALSO READ | Video of Hema Malini sweeping goes viral. After cleaning water, she is cleaning air, says InternetALSO WATCH | PM Modi failed on every front: Omar AbdullahFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySnigdha Choudhury Next Practice holding broom in private before next photo op: Omar Abdullah to Hema MaliniFormer Jammu and Kashmir CM Omar Abdullah was responding to a Swachh Bharat programme held inside the Parliament complex in which several BJP MPs, including actor-turned-politician Hema Malini, could be seen wielding a broom.advertisementlast_img read more