R128m revamp for Mdantsane CBD

first_img“We initiated the project to stimulate economic development through the creation of an enabling environment for business and to leverage public funds to boost private sector funding in the area,” said Khetsi. “The municipality’s engineering department has already identified infrastructure capacity constraints, particularly the sanitation services, which need to be upgraded,” municipal spokesperson Samkelo Ngwenya said in East London last week. “We have also started with the land acquisition process to purchase privately-owned land for identified projects. The BRT route will include the Qumza Highway, which connects East London and Mdantsane. Mdantsane Urban Renewal Programme operations manager Mamoeketsi Khetsi said the revamp project will include increased residential and commerical opportunities, better use of public spaces, and recreational and social entertainment facilities. 26 April 2011 Mdantsane, just outside East London, will undergo a R128-million makeover as part of the Buffalo City Municipality’s Mdantsane Urban Renewal Programme, which seeks to breathe new life into ageing infrastructure and dilapidated social facilities in the township. Plans to revamp the central business district of Mdantsane in the Eastern Cape – one of South Africa’s largest townships – are in full swing. A boxing museum, private clinic, social housing facility and student residence are other projects that are set to be built in the central business district. Increased residential and commercial opportunities Source: BuaNews “This project is in keeping with the city’s aims of building infrastructure that will boost economic and social development, and create sustainable development within the area,” Ngwenya said. The funds will be spent over the next five to 10 years in an effort to boost the area economically. Plans for revamping the central business district also include the introduction of a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) public transport system, which is expected to be complete next year.last_img read more

Maritime cluster for Mandela Bay

first_imgA dedicated maritime cluster in theEastern Cape will boost regional economy.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. Formore free images, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Peter Myles  Coordinator: NMB maritime cluster  interim task team  +27 82 556 1680 • Tantaswa Cici  Manager: maritime safety, Eastern  Cape Department of Transport  +27 43 604 7629 or +27 71 673 5171 RELATED ARTICLES • Motor cluster will drive change • Safer seas for PE’s marine life • SA maritime industry set to grow • Aviation, maritime careers for youth • SA harbour chief makes world historyEmily van RijswijckPlans are afoot to create a dedicated maritime cluster for the port region of Nelson Mandela Bay (NMB) in the Eastern Cape in order to build on and enhance the city’s existing marine activities.The cluster idea is a joint initiative of the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality and the Nelson Mandela Bay Business Chamber. The first meeting of the partners took place in February in Port Elizabeth and was attended by 80 invited participants, all with a direct interest in the sector.“Port Elizabeth is historically a maritime city and yet for some reason it has never developed a maritime industry,” says Peter Myles, coordinator of the interim task team elected at the inaugural meeting to look into the viability of the venture.Myles is also chairman of the NMB Tourism Industry Association and a lecturer at NMMU in marine tourism and coastal recreation.The interim task team will appoint a steering committee, which will develop the policy, goals, strategy, actions and resources for a cluster framework aligned to the province’s integrated provincial maritime plan, currently under review.The steering committee will start by investigating the feasibility of ship building and other related industries, including the establishment of a maritime university.Port Elizabeth’s harbour, the fifth largest in South Africa, plays an important role in the movement of clean cargo, automotive parts and vehicles. The magnificent Port of Ngqura, now South Africa’s premier trans-shipment hub, lies a mere 20 km to the north.The Bay, as the city is fondly referred to, also has much to offer in terms of marine tourism. It’s home to one of the largest colonies of the endangered African penguin, and the marine section of the Greater Addo Elephant Park shares the bay area with the city.According to Myles, the main conclusion drawn at the first meeting was that the maritime sector could be a leading contributor to a sustainable provincial economy.Benefiting the greater communityThe maritime industry encompasses a vast array of activities and disciplines, among them designing, building and operating vessels; stevedoring and customs brokerage services; fisheries; the marine railways sector and the myriad industries involved in the maintenance and repair of vessels.Coastal and marine tourism and similar enterprises are also included in this sector.Some of these industries, such as stevedoring, are already in place in Port Elizabeth, while others, such as boatbuilding and repairs, are sorely lacking.In addition, Port Elizabeth remains a favourite tourist destination for South Africans, and international tourism numbers continue to grow.Estimates put the number of foreign visitors to Port Elizabeth in 2010 at 250 000 and domestics tourists in the same year at about 1-million, while the combined spend amounted to about R3-billion (US$386-million).Of special interest to potential cluster partners is the role such a combined effort can play in helping small to medium enterprises.“International experience indicates that the level of business formation tends to be higher in clusters,” says Myles. “Start-ups are more reliant on external suppliers and partners, all of which they find in a cluster, so clusters reduce the costs of failure, as entrepreneurs can fall back on local employment opportunities in the many other companies in the same field.”Clusters also encourage knowledge-sharing and innovation and in these areas NMMU has the potential to play a critical role, he adds.“Nelson Mandela Bay is a region where small-scale businesses and disadvantaged coastal communities could largely benefit, improving their job opportunities and their lives through application of a proposed micro-enterprise promotion strategy.”It is hoped that the cluster will stimulate the growth of smaller companies offering services such as boat building and repairs. It could also enhance the existing coastal and marine tourism sector and even, perhaps, encourage the creation of a maritime university.“In a nutshell, the expectation is that a maritime cluster will uncover Port Elizabeth’s competitive advantage and, with collaboration, will assist in the growth of this sector,” says Myles.Other clusters to boost local economyThe announcement of the maritime cluster follows closely on the heels of the recently launched Eastern Cape automotive cluster, which was formally inaugurated by trade and industry minister Rob Davis in March.Globally, clusters have become the norm in the creation of cross-industry linkages and complementary relationships. In Europe, maritime clusters are well established and offer their members a competitive advantage, says Myles.“In less than half a decade cluster development has become a common factor for economic development agencies in over 40 countries around the world. Clusters are the building blocks of a productive, innovative economy.”Port Elizabeth then and nowThe port area of Port Elizabeth is more than 180 years old. Following the arrival of British settlers in 1820 the harbour area became extremely busy, with mohair, wool and ostrich feathers the most common cargo shipped from the port.By 1825 Port Elizabeth was given port status with the appointment of a harbour master and, a year later, of a collector of customs.According to the Department of Transport 80% of the country’s trade is carried out by sea and it has therefore become necessary to prioritise the shipping industry.South Africa is one of the top 15 shipping countries in the world in terms of the tonnage transported to and from its ports.last_img read more

Mobile Application to Diagnose Disease by Hearing you Cough

first_imgTags:#health#mobile#news#NYT#Real World#web Feeling a bit under the weather? Soon you’ll be able to cough into your mobile phone for an instant diagnosis. A research firm called STAR Analytical Services is working to develop software that can analyze the sound of a cough and identify it as either associated with a common cold, the flu, or something worse – like pneumonia or another serious respiratory disease. Just as doctors have been doing for years, the software will “listen” to the wetness or dryness of a cough and determine whether all you need is a lozenge or if you need to come in for a doctor’s visit instead. Turn Your Head…Towards Your Mobile PhoneThe American and Australian scientists at STAR have received a $100,000 grant from the Gates Foundation to develop the cough-analyzing software for developing countries where access to health care is more limited than in first world nations. Despite the poor economic conditions of these under-developed countries, there are a plethora of mobile phones which are being used for everything from early warning systems to mobile payments to health alerts. An mobile app that diagnoses disease would fit right in. The way the diagnostic software works is by comparing the sounds of the mobile user’s cough to a database of coughs associated with all the different types of respiratory diseases. There would also be multiple coughs per disease stored in the database to take into account variations by age, gender, weight, and other factors. While to our untrained ears, many coughs sound just alike, a tuned-in doctor – or in this case, a mobile app – can listen to the entire structure of a cough from the initial intake of air to the final 100-150 milliseconds of a cough that contains the distinctive “wet” or “dry” and “productive” or “unproductive” sounds that help to classify the cough’s seriousness, explains an article on Discovery News. Even the loudness of a cough is taken into account – healthy people have coughs that are 2% louder than a sick person’s. At the moment, the software exists as a computer application but the scientists plan to have it re-written, when complete, as an application for mobile phones. There’s no word on when the mobile application will be released, but the scientists will need to collect around 1000 cough samples before the database is ready. If they’re able to then design a successful analytical tool for mobile phones, the impacts to people’s health would be far-reaching – and not just in developing countries, but everywhere in the world. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement sarah perez What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Ross, San Miguel put clamps on Ginebra import Brownlee

first_imgView comments Read Next MOST READ WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:30’Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Ross is also hopeful that wins like these can finally silence critics saying that San Miguel is in a disarray.“I don’t think anything was wrong with us. We lost two games by one point. It’s not like we’re getting blown out. The game against Alaska, we got blown out, but before that, games against NLEX and Star were decided by just one possession,” he said. “I felt like we’re not playing bad even though we’re at 3-3. We’re always one possession away.”Ross agreed that looking back, the Beermen made a mistake on replacing Wendell McKines with Terik Bridgeman.But with Terrence Watson now in the fold, he believes that San Miguel is back to its old dominant self as it seeks to make it to the top four and ultimately capture the Grand Slam.“When we changed imports, I guess you could say they made the wrong decision, but I felt we’re playing good enough to win games. We’re just not making plays at the end of the game. But now that we got an import that competes and fits in well with us, plus we’re getting healthy and coach is finding our way with our rotation, then we’re starting to play a little bit better which is causing us to win games,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT “I was just taking the challenge,” shared Ross on Sunday. “He was really a prolific import. He puts his shirts on like I put my shorts on in the morning, so I just go out there and compete.”It may seem like a mismatch but the veteran guard showed he is the right man to slow down Brownlee, who was limited to just 14 points on 7-of-18 shooting from the field.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutRoss, who had four steals, was also stellar on the offensive end with 20 points, four rebounds and five assists.“We’re desperate for a win and Ginebra is playing great basketball, so I’m just happy that we’re able to pull this win out,” he said. “Everyone played well. We had a great game plan from coach and we’re able to squeak this one out.”center_img Desiderio walks the talk in UP’s last-second win over UST Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president LATEST STORIES Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. San Miguel Beer guard Chris Ross and import Terrence Watson double teams Barangay Ginebra import Justin Brownlee. PBA IMAGESChris Ross may have given up four inches in defending Justin Brownlee, but at the end of the day, that huge height disparity was hardly a factor at all.Bringing in his scrappiness and grit, the reigning Defensive Player of the Year hounded the Ginebra import for the 42 minutes he spent on the floor to help San Miguel come away with a 107-103 victory.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Central Michigan Preparing For Boone Pickens Stadium With Practice Crowd Noise

first_imgOklahoma State will face a tougher test this Saturday against the Central Michigan Chippewas, who played the Cowboys very tough a year ago, before falling 24-13. Central Michigan, who finished 7-6 and lost 21-14 to Minnesota in the Quick Lane Bowl a year ago, bounced Presbyterian 49-3 last weekend in their season opener. While the Chippewas are excited for another crack at the 22nd ranked Cowboys, CMU head coach John Bonamego stressed the importance of playing solid in all facets of the game and avoiding costly turnovers, speaking to CM Life, a Central Michigan University publication:“We’re going to have to play well in all three phases,” he said. “We can’t have a bunch of penalties, we have to take care of the football and defensively we have to be very sound.”The Chippewas will lean heavily on Senior QB Cooper Rush, who threw for an impressive 3,848 yards and 25 touchdowns last season, and rushing for 3 more scores. Going into a hostile environment such as Boone Pickens Stadium, Rush will be invaluable for the Chippewas looking to pull off the upset. Bonamego didn’t sound too concerned with the road atmosphere in Stillwater, compared to the other MAC teams on the schedule for the Chippewas.“It’s more about the 22 players on the field than it is the 60,000 in the stands,” Bonamego said. “College stadiums can get loud, but we work with that all the time.”Despite the lack of concern, the Chippewas have been preparing this week for the raucous BPS by having crowds making noise at their practices while the offense is looking to snap the ball, which shows their awareness for what awaits for them in Stillwater. Look for the senior QB Rush to come in prepared and unafraid as Central Michigan squares off against the Cowboys this weekend.“This will be a good test for us in a lot of ways,” said Mike Gundy. “I’ve always been a big fan of the quarterback (Cooper Rush). He’s a potential NFL player. They’ve got eight returning starters on defense. They have some guys back in the running game. We’re going to continue to push forward. We need some quality work. We’ve got some areas that we certainly need to improve in. I feel like we’re making some strides in important areas of our team, but we still need to practice. I’m looking forward to a good week getting ready for Central Michigan.”If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

VIC vs SA- JUNIOR BORDER CHALLENGE

first_imgJuly 16-17: Touch SA vs Victoria Touch- `The Junior Border Challenge’. Tracy Frith from Touch SA and Peter Shefford from Victoria Touch have provided us with the following report: In weather conditions (read: rain & hail) reminiscent of the northern state junior championships, the young touch stars of neighbouring states South Australia and Victoria took to the fields last weekend to battle for honours in the 2005 Junior Border Challenge…. The fierce competition between SA and Victoria which has existed for many years in the adult age brackets of Touch & sport in general, has now filtered down to the junior age level. Last weekends Junior Border Challenge saw the Under 18 boys and girls teams from both SA and Victoria compete for the first time in a 3-game series, vying for State supremacy as well as selection for the Crusaders teams to compete at the National Under 18’s Championships in September. For several years now the Open teams have taken part in the series but this was the first time the up and coming talent had been pitted against each other. In support of taking elite touch to the affiliates and hence the title “Border Challenge”, traditionally the event is played in Mt Gambier, which lies on the border of the two states. The playing arena was Grant High School and greatly supported by representatives of the Mt Gambier Touch Association and staff of the school with regard to facilities and field preparation. Given the previous few weeks of wet, windy and cold weather experienced in both SA and Victoria, all expected Mt Gambier to be no different in the middle of July. Despite this thinking, nothing could have prepared us for the atrocious weather conditions all endured including rain, high winds, thunder and hail, with two of the games temporarily delayed during play for all to take shelter while the storm passed. These rising stars also put on a display of tenacious defence, hot stepping attacking action, and of course, the games were played in the sportsmanlike manner one has come to expect in our sport. With the Opens challenge looming up in early September, it was South Australia that drew first blood in the annual interstate series, taking both junior divisions, and the series, with an overall 5-1 win rate. Results from the weekend’s games were: GIRLS 18’s South Australia (5) def Victoria (0) South Australia (3) def Victoria (0) South Australia (7) def Victoria (3) BOYS 18’s South Australia (5) def Victoria (4) Victoria (6) def South Australia (4) South Australia (5) def Victoria (4) * 2005 Border Challenge Under 18’s Girls Champions – South Australia * 2005 Border Challenge Under 18’s Boys Champions – South Australia * 2005 Border Challenge Overall State Champions – South Australia From this event the Crusaders 18 years & under teams were chosen, to contest the ATA Youth Championships in late September. Congratulations to all the plauers that took part and a big thanks to Mt Gambier Touch for hosting the event. The gauntlet has now been laid, and only time will tell whether the Vics can reclaim the ascendancy when the Opens clash down the track …..!? By Tracy Frith and Peter Shefford.last_img

DEADLINE FOR AFFILIATION NEARS- HOW DOES THIS AFFECT ME?

first_imgAs the October 14 deadline approaches for affiliates to sign on with Touch Football Australia, more and more people are contacting the office, asking how the decision their affiliate makes will affect them. In the past couple of weeks information packs were sent out to every affiliate Australia-wide (with the exception of NSW affiliates), containing info on the unitary model of managment and the process and benefits of affiliation with Touch Football Australia (TFA). This article contains 10 FAQ’s about the NTL, what this means for elite players, info for coaches/referees/selectors, insurance, assets and more. If you are wondering the importance of your affiliates decision for you as a general Touchie, click here for the full story: 1) I’M AN ELITE PLAYER. WHAT HAPPENS TO ME? Players must be part of an affiliated competition to be eligible to participate in the National Touch League (NTL) and all other competitions run or sanctioned by Touch Football Australia (TFA). Players from unaffiliated competitions will not be able to play in regional, state, interstate, national or international competitions. This follows through into Regional, State, and National representative teams, with only players from affiliated competitions being eligible for selection. This is no different than the rules in place already. The current NTL “Conditions of Entry” require that all participating ATA NTL Permit holders and CB’s and Participants must be fully financial with the ATA and abide by the laws and by-laws of the ATA – ie you (Participants) will not be eligible to be a part of the NTL if you are involved in a non-affiliated competition. Representative players are also currently chosen from affiliated competitions only. Talent ID and high performance support of all kinds, including funding assistance to events, camps, sports science and medicine – will only be available to players from affiliated competitions. There will be no elite pathway for athletes involved in unaffiliated competition. Rumours of “elite competition” against New Zealand teams are false. The Touch New Zealand Board has informed us that they will not be sanctioning any competition between non-affiliated regions in Australia with affiliated members of TNZ. Please note: NSW players are not affected, as under the new constitution NSW is a member in its own right. 2) I’M AN ACCREDITED COACH / OFFICIAL. WHAT HAPPENS TO ME? Touch Football Australia (TFA) is the peak body for the sport and is recognised by the Australian Sports Commission (ASC). TFA runs courses and accredits coaches and officials under the auspices of the National Coaching Accreditation Scheme and the National Officiating Accreditation Scheme of the ASC. To be eligible to further your career or knowledge as a coach or official under these schemes, you will need to be a part of an affiliated competition. Only TFA will run nationally recognised courses as these courses are copyright and non-affiliated bodies will not be able to run them. In addition only TFA will offer qualifications for coaches and officials that will be recognised nationally and internationally. Assessments for coaches and officials will only be available at TFA sanctioned competitions. State and national coaches, referees and selectors will be chosen from among those involved in affiliated competitions only. 3) AS AN AFFILIATE, WE RUN / WANT TO RUN AUSTOUCH. WHAT IMPACT DOES THE UNITARY MODEL HAVE? AusTouch is the official vehicle for introducing juniors into the sport. It was developed by Touch Football Australia (TFA) with assistance from the Australian Sports Commission and is copyright. No unaffiliated organisation will be able to run AusTouch programs or use AusTouch resources. 4) OUR AFFILIATE NEEDS SERVICE FROM DEVELOPMENT OFFICERS. HOW DOES THE NEW MODEL IMPACT ON THIS? Development Officers from the TFA offices in each state will provide service to affiliated competitions only. 5) OUR AFFILIATE RUNS/IS PLANNING TO RUN SPORTING PULSE FOR OUR COMPETITION MANAGEMENT. IF WE DON’T AFFILIATE, WHAT HAPPENS? Only affiliated competitions will have access to Sporting Pulse, which is paid for through affiliation fees. If TFA does not receive an affiliate’s fees, then it cannot provide the service to them. 6) WILL WE BE INSURED IF WE DON’T AFFILIATE? No. Affiliation fees paid to TFA include a component for insurance which is immediately forwarded to the national insurance provider along with details of whom is paying the insurance. If fees are not paid, you will not be covered. Non-affiliated competitions may seek other insurance arrangements. However, by virtue of large purchasing power, TFA is able to offer low rates and good cover. Alternative arrangements by smaller organisations are unlikely to be competitive or offer comparable benefits. 7) WHAT HAPPENS TO THE NTL PERMITS? The current arrangements for Permits in all states except Qld will not change, since all affiliates will become part of TFA. The current arrangements for NSW Permits will not change. 8) I’M FROM A QLD REGION THAT DOES NOT SUPPORT THE NEW STRUCTURE. WHAT HAPPENS TO OUR NTL PERMIT? TFA owns and allocates all Permits. The TFA Board will reconsider the allocation of Permits in Qld on the basis of the number of affiliates that become members of TFA as of October 14, 2005. TFA will cancel Permits currently allocated to those regions that are not part of the new structure. Sunshine Coast will be allocated the current Rustlers Permit. TFA affiliates across the Rustlers drawing area will be eligible to be a part of the Permit but athletes from non-affiliated competitions will not. Brisbane City will retain their Permit. 9) HOW MUCH WILL AFFILIATION FEES COST UNDER THE NEW STRUCTURE? For the upcoming season, fees will remain as they are now. However, once the new structure is fully in place and we are able to budget effectively, fees will be reviewed for season one 2006. 10) OUR AFFILIATE HAS ASSETS. IF WE BECOME PART OF TFA DO WE HAVE TO TRANSFER THEM TO TFA? No. Affiliates continue to operate as they do now. Assets of affiliates will not be affected; they will not be transferred to anyone at any time.last_img read more

Exceptionally serious Report says half of Canadian wildlife declining

first_imgAn extensive survey of 903 species of Canadian birds, fish, mammals, reptiles and amphibians over more than four decades has found that half of them are in serious population decline.Declining species lost a total of 83 per cent of their numbers between 1970 and 2014, says the report released Thursday by the World Wildlife Fund. Species protected by federal legislation shrank nearly as quickly as those that weren’t.“In general terms, the Species At Risk Act does not seem to have made any difference,” said WWF president David Miller. “There’s an incredible urgency to reverse the decline.”The Living Planet Index could be the most comprehensive assessment of wildlife numbers in Canada.The organization looked at 3,689 different populations of 386 kinds of birds, 365 fish species, 106 different mammals and 46 reptiles and amphibians. It combined more than 400 datasets from government, academe, industry and citizen science using a peer-reviewed method developed by the Zoological Society of London.Overall numbers for all 903 species decreased by eight per cent over the 44 years studied.A total of 45 species were stable and 407 increased. Many of those benefited from large-scale conservation measures.Waterfowl, which increased by 54 per cent, have enjoyed widespread wetland preservation. Birds such as falcons are no longer harmed by DDT and grew by 88 per cent.Others on the increase were generalist species such as deer or geese that live well alongside humans.The survey found a familiar combination of reasons for declining populations: habitat loss, climate change, invasive species and pollution.Miller said it was surprising to find legislation such as the Species At Risk Act, passed in 2004, has done nothing to slow the decline.“What the science says is that it hasn’t made a material difference to the species.”Species listed under the act declined by 63 per cent over the study period. As well, the study suggests the rate of decline may have actually picked up after the act was passed.Part of that is due to the time it takes for action. Miller points out the St. Lawrence beluga was known to be at risk even before the act was passed, yet it took until 2015 for protections to be put in place.“There have been incredible delays in taking the steps mandated under the act.”The legislation may no longer be the best tool to protect wildlife, said Miller. There are too many shrinking species to protect each one individually.“We probably need a different approach,” he said. “The challenges are so complex and have multiple causes. You can’t rely simply on a plan for species. You have to look at a whole ecosystem.”There isn’t, for example, much that can be done to halt the slow disappearance of Pacific killer whales until scientists understand why chinook salmon — the orca’s main food — are declining.It will take networks of protected areas to reverse the trends, said Miller. He noted the survey does show that a collective approach — such as that taken to protect waterfowl — can make a difference.But the breadth and speed of the decline means action must be taken quickly.“Even for us, it’s sobering to see the results,” Miller said.“The declines are exceptionally serious. We need real urgency to take action.”— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960last_img read more

McMichael Canadian Art Collection bets big on past for 50th anniversary

first_img Login/Register With: A 50th anniversary is a big deal for a cultural institution. There’s enough history to celebrate, consider and, in some instances, reconsider. There’s the opportunity to refresh the institution’s profile and evaluate its position within contemporary art discourse. It’s an occasion, too, to strategize, to wonder, “Now what? Sure, we’ve made it this far – but what needs to be done to ensure another half-century?”The McMichael Canadian Art Collection is in the midst of just such a rumination – an exercise brought into even sharper focus last week when the famous woodsy gallery here, 40 kilometres northwest of Toronto, named British museum professional Ian Dejardin as its new director and chief executive officer. Lest we forget, it was 50 years ago this summer that the McMichael first opened its doors to the public as a Crown corporation of the province of Ontario. The deal that, on paper at least, transformed the McMichael from the fiefdom of founders Robert and Signe McMichael into a public trust had been reached in November, 1965. However, extensive and expensive renovations to the site meant that its roughly 200 artworks weren’t ready for their close-up until July.Alexander Young Jackson, October Morning, Algoma, 1920. (Toni Hafkenscheid/ University of Toronto Purchased by the Hart House Art Committee 1931/32) Advertisement Facebook Called, initially, the McMichael Conservation Collection of Art, the “collection” referenced in the moniker was unashamedly Canadian. Or at least unashamedly Canuck in its devotion to art of a particular ilk, namely oil sketches, drawings and paintings by the Group of Seven, Emily Carr and their contemporaries and followers, plus work by First Nations artists. Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more