Vigilance key to avoid healthcare battle on two fronts

first_imgThe nationwide figure was around half of 69,424 cases reported in the same period last year. The nation saw 536 fatalities in the same period in 2019.Despite the lower number of cases so far this year, Budi Haryanto, a professor at the University of Indonesia’s (UI) School of Public Health, urged the government to exercise vigilance, given that more people were staying home now under the government’s instruction to contain the spread of COVID-19. He said this might expose them to a higher risk of encountering the Aedes aegypti mosquito, a host of numerous viruses, including the dengue virus.“Many people are staying home right now, which means the risk of [contracting dengue fever] would be increased,” Budi said.Aedes aegypti mosquitoes tend to live near humans and hide inside houses, particularly in dark places. They tend to only go outdoors in search of breeding grounds, according to Budi. The government, with much of its focus now on battling the COVID-19 outbreak, should remain vigilant in anticipation of dengue fever cases to ease the strain on medical facilities in the country, a health expert has said.A total of 34,451 dengue fever cases were recorded in Indonesia from January to March 24, with West Java having reported the highest number of cases at 5,894, followed by East Nusa Tenggara with 3,595 cases and Lampung with 3,408 cases, according to Health Ministry data. Dengue fever claimed 212 lives during the same period. Occasional fogging, a well-established measure to kill adult mosquitoes by spraying insecticides around houses and residential areas, could be less effective now, considering the longer people stay at home during daytime, he said. He, instead, recommended people to regularly spray mosquito repellents around their premises early in the morning, before the mosquito’s active hours later in the day.Currently no province has raised its alert status to that of an extraordinary occurrence (KLB) for dengue fever, said Siti Nadia Tarmizi, the Health Ministry’s director of vector and zoonotic infectious diseases.Six cities and regencies, meanwhile, have declared the KLB status so far this year. East Nusa Tenggara’s Sikka, the regency with the highest number of dengue fever cases in the country this year at 1,480 cases, revoked its KLB status on March 18, indicating that the situation there had already improved, said Siti.Yet, she called on the public to keep their environment clean and remove stagnant water to deprive the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes of breeding spots, considering that, according to previous data, dengue fever cases usually peaked between March and April.“We keep reminding the public to stay vigilant, because this is the period of dengue transmission,” Siti said. “People are urged to actively clean their houses and surroundings from mosquito nests, particularly since most people are staying home now.”The central government, she said, continued to update regional administrations with the latest available data and analysis to ensure they remained alert in anticipation of the dengue fever outbreak.With more than 1,000 dengue fever cases reported, questions remain as to whether Jakarta, which is the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in Indonesia, will be able to handle two epidemics simultaneously.As of Saturday afternoon, Jakarta recorded 627 COVID-19 cases — or around 54 percent of the 1,155 cases recorded across Indonesia — and 62 deaths, according to government data published on covid19.go.id.The Jakarta Health Agency’s data, information and report management head Verry Adrian said that, as of Thursday, no hospitals in Jakarta had reported disruption of their services because of treating dengue fever patients.He said that the Jakarta administration routinely conducted public campaigns on dengue prevention and putting healthcare facilities on standby to treat the cases.To curb the spread of dengue fever, the Jakarta Health Agency has also been encouraging households to appoint a member who can monitor larvae inside the house, called a jumantik. The agency is also working with one jumantik for every community unit (RW).The Jakarta administration, in collaboration with the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) and the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), provides an early warning system for dengue fever on dbd.bmkg.go.id. The online platform provides estimates on the number of dengue fever cases in each municipality in Jakarta, with rainfall and humidity used as the main predictors.According to the website, the rate of dengue fever cases in April was estimated to be higher than the rate in March, based on its prediction on March 16. It projected South Jakarta to have the highest rate of dengue fever cases with 12.8 cases per 100,000 people in April, compared to 12.5 cases per 100,000 people in March.The administration urges people to stay alert for rates above three cases per 100,000 people.Topics :last_img read more

Irish PM in unprecedented attack on Vatican

first_img Share Share Sharing is caring! Share Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny said the relationship between the Catholic Church and the state could never be the same.Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny has launched an unprecedented attack on the Catholic Church in parliament.He said the recent Cloyne Report into how allegations of sex-abuse by priests in Cork had been covered up showed change was urgently needed.Mr Kenny said the historic relationship between church and state in Ireland could not be the same again.He said the report exposed the elitism, dysfunction, disconnection, and narcissism that dominated the Vatican.“The rape and torture of children were downplayed or ‘managed’ to uphold instead the primacy of the institution, its power, standing and ‘reputation’,” the taoiseach said.‘Unprecedented’“The revelations of the Cloyne Report have brought the government, Irish Catholics and the Vatican to an unprecedented juncture.”Opposition leader Michael Martin said that when he met the Papal Nuncio after the Murphy report into the cover-up of abuse in the Dublin diocese in 2009, he told him the government expected the full cooperation of the Vatican into the Cloyne inquiry.However, he said, the Vatican chose to focus on the interests of the church rather than the children abused by its clergy and shielded by its leaders.During the debate, the church was called upon to publish the audits currently being sent to every Catholic diocese in the country.Sinn Fein spokesperson on health and children Caoimhghin O’Caolain said the government should consider coordinating with the Northern Ireland Executive on any future inquiries – particularly as four of the Catholic dioceses straddle the border.BBC Newscenter_img 27 Views   no discussions Tweet FaithInternationalLifestylePrint Irish PM in unprecedented attack on Vatican by: – July 20, 2011last_img read more

Dangerous abortions ‘on the rise’, says WHO

first_img Share HealthLifestyle Dangerous abortions ‘on the rise’, says WHO by: – January 19, 2012 Sharing is caring! Share The Guttmacher Institute’s Gilda Sedgh on the WHO study into abortionA rising proportion of abortions worldwide are putting women’s health at risk, researchers say.The World Health Organization study suggests global abortion rates are steady, at 28 per 1,000 women a year.However, the proportion of the total carried out without trained clinical help rose from 44% in 1995 to 49% in 2008.The Lancet, which carried the report, said the figures were “deeply disturbing”.Unsafe abortion is one of the main contributors to maternal death worldwide, and refers to procedures outside hospitals, clinics and surgeries, or without qualified medical supervision.Women are more vulnerable to dangerous infection or bleeding in these environments.Maternal mortalityIn developing countries, particularly those with more restrictive abortion laws, most abortions are unsafe, with 97% of abortions in Africa described this way.In comparison, 95% of abortions in Latin America were deemed unsafe, falling to 40% in Asia, 15% in Oceania and 9% in Europe.To compile the figures – often a difficult task in countries where abortion is illegal – the researchers used surveys, official statistics and hospital records.They concluded that while the abortion rate had fallen since 1995, that drop had now levelled off, and overall, the rise in world population meant that there were 2.2 million more abortions in 2008 compared with 2003.In the developed world, the proportion of pregnancies ending in abortion fell from 36% in 1995 to 26% in 2008.Countries with restrictive abortion laws did not have a corresponding decrease in abortion rate – in some cases, the reverse was true.Professor Beverly Winikoff, from Gynuity, a New York organisation which pushes for access to safer abortion, wrote in the Lancet: “Unsafe abortion is one of the five major contributors to maternal mortality, causing one in every seven or eight maternal deaths in 2008.“Yet, when abortion is provided with proper medical techniques and care, the risk of death is negligible and nearly 14 times lower than that of childbirth.“The data continue to confirm what we have known for decades – that women who wish to terminate unwanted pregnancies will seek abortion at any cost, even if it is illegal or involves risk to their own lives.”Dr Richard Horton, the Lancet’s editor, said: “These latest figures are deeply disturbing. The progress made in the 1990s is now in reverse.“Condemning, stigmatising and criminalising abortion are cruel and failed strategies.”Kate Hawkins, from the Sexuality and Development Programme at the Institute of Development Studies, said: “Whether it is legal or illegal, women will seek abortions and obtain abortions. “This study showed that in 2008, 86% of abortions took place in developing countries and that nearly half of all abortions worldwide were unsafe in 2008.“That women continue to die in significant numbers because of unsafe abortion is a scandal and is an issue that the development sector should take seriously.”The UK Department for International Development part-funded the study, and International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell MP said it was a “tragedy” that the number of “back-street” abortions was rising.“Women should be able to decide for themselves whether, when and how many children to have – but for many this is not a reality as they have no access to family planning.“Over the next four years, British aid will give 10 million women access to modern contraception, which will prevent millions of unintended pregnancies.”BBC Newscenter_img 42 Views   no discussions Share Tweetlast_img read more