Are Pro Wrestlers Dying at an Unusual Rate

I was barely 13 years old during WrestleMania VI on April 1, 1990, and just about at the height of my pro-wrestling fandom. I watched every televised event and read wrestling magazines, and I had been to a live event at the Blaisdell Arena in Honolulu. I even watched unofficial wrestling-analysis shows that aired in the middle of the night. I was delirious.My favorite wrestler was Brutus “The Barber” Beefcake, who took on “Mr. Perfect,” who had yet to lose in a televised head-to-head matchup. Brutus won. “Mr. Perfect,” a.k.a. Curt Hennig, had finally lost.Hennig died in 2003 at age 44.Of course, the main event at WrestleMania VI was the “Ultimate Challenge,” in which The Ultimate Warrior defeated Hulk Hogan to unify the Intercontinental Championship and the WWF Championship for the first — and so far only — time ever (the WWF changed its name to the WWE in 2002).The Ultimate Warrior, James Hellwig, died two weeks ago at age 54.Here are a few other pieces of information about WrestleMania VI:One match — Earthquake’s defeat of Hercules — featured two wrestlers who are now both dead.It was Andre the Giant’s last major televised match; he died in 1993 at age 46.Dusty Rhodes, who won his first wrestling title in 1968, is 68. His tag-team partner, Sapphire, his opponents “Macho Man” Randy Savage and the Sensational Queen Sherri, and his surprise manager, Miss Elizabeth (who was in a “feud” with Macho Man, her real-life husband), died in 1996, 2011, 2007 and 2003, respectively.Just five of 14 matches featured wrestlers who are all alive today.Here’s the card with all of the televised matches for the night. I’ve marked the ones who are dead in red; it’s one-third of the wrestlers who appeared (12 of 36, plus Miss Elizabeth).For all the dramatized bloodshed of professional wrestling, the card for WrestleMania VI certainly looks like a bloodbath. Is there anything fishy about pro wrestling, or are my intuitions about what percentage of young 1990s athletes should be alive 25 years later just way off?Let’s look at some data.I collected biographical information (including date of birth and date of death, if applicable) from the Internet Wrestling Database on all WWF wrestlers who are/would be younger than 60 in 2014, and who had at least 20 pay-per-view appearances between WrestleMania I in 1985 and the time the WWF was forced to change its name by the World Wildlife Fund in 2002 — for 203 in all.I then calculated each wrestler’s chances of dying between the ages of 25 (roughly around when his or her career may have started) and however old he or she is/would be in 2014, using actuarial tables from the Social Security Administration. Because health technology has improved significantly, I used a 1990 actuarial table to cover years before 2000, a 2000 table to cover years 2000 to 2009, and a 2010 table to cover 2010 to the present.I then broke them down by age groups and compared each group’s death rate with its expected death rate:We can also calculate the probability of so many wrestlers dying in each age group and overall by chance (using binom.dist), and it comes out like so:Note: I calculated each wrestler’s odds individually, but the probabilities in the last column of this table are based on the average probability for each group (which gets us extremely close, though technically it could be calculated precisely).I don’t want to speculate as to the cause of this phenomenon, though a number of theories in varying shades of sinister spring to mind. But it saddens me to think that my 13-year old self was so thoroughly entertained by watching ghosts. Rest in peace. read more

BAHAMAS International Womens Day recognizes women in rural communities

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, March 7, 2018 – Nassau -The Bahamas will focus on women and girls who live in the remote areas of the archipelago, namely the Family Island Communities, in celebration of International Women’s Day, March 8, 2018.The Minister of Social Services and Urban Development, the Hon. Lanisha Rolle, encouraged Bahamians to assist and support women in strengthening their communities, to help to build families and country. Related Items: She said women in rural communities have endured devastating damages as a result of natural disasters, low employment opportunities, limited weekly air and sea travel to and from islands and more.“Despite these challenges, the women in these communities have been resilient and strong. Many of them have managed to eke out a livelihood through sheer grit and determination, using the natural resources around them to become skilled in straw craft, farming, fishing and making preservatives.  As a result, they have been able to sustain their families and remain in their communities,” she said. Minister Rolle saluted the women of the Family Islands, The Bahamas and around the world.A Women’s Forum on Thursday, March 8 at Harry C. Moore Auditorium will address the topic, “Challenges and Opportunities in Achieving Gender Equality and Empowerment of Rural Women and Girls.” A special video documentary showcasing the determination of women and girls in rural communities in The Bahamas and sponsored by the Department of Gender and Family Affairs will be aired on ZNS TV.By: Kathryn Campbell (BIS)Photo captions:Header: The Hon. Lanisha Rolle, Minister of Social Services and Urban Development, speaks about International Women’s Day 2018 (far right); Emma Foulkes, Deputy Permanent Secretary (centre); and Coralee Adderley.Insert: Parliamentary Secretary the Hon. Vaughn Miller is shown first from left.BIS Photos/Derek Smithlast_img read more

14 kids die of Encephalitis in Bihars Muzaffarpur

first_imgIndian medical staff attend to a child admitted in the Encephalitis ward at The Baba Raghav Das Hospital in Gorakhpur, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, on August 12, 2017.SANJAY KANOJIA/AFP/Getty Images [Representational Image]Nearly 14 children are reported to have died in Muzaffarpur district of Bihar due to suspected Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) and Japanese Encephalitis (JE).According to the reports, five children have died in the past 24 hours due to the infection and over a dozen, kids are being treated at Shri Krishna Memorial College Hospital (SKMCH) and Kejriwal Hospital after showing various symptoms of Encephalitis, including high fever and unconsciousness.At least 21 children were admitted at Shri Krishna Memorial College Hospital and 14 were admitted at Kejriwal Hospital on Friday. The Superintendent of SKMCH Sunil Shahi said that the hospital has received a total of 38 patients so far and most of them have glucose deficiency in their blood.District Civil Surgeon SP Singh said that two of the children who died last week has been confirmed of Acute Encephalitis Syndrome. The death of the rest is unknown as of now but the authorities are investigating the incident.Singh said that most of the patients suspected of the infection were brought to the hospital with high fever and Hypoglycemia (a condition caused by a very low level of blood sugar (glucose), the body’s main energy source).”All primary health centres in the district have been put on high alert. But the people need to be cautious about their children as well. Give them as much liquid as you can and keep them hydrated,” he added, reports PTI.Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) is a serious health problem in India. It can be identified by the starting of high fever and clinical neurological manifestation that includes mental confusion, disorientation, delirium or coma. The infection commonly affects children and young adults and can lead to considerable morbidity and mortality.According to the National Health Portal of India, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) is the major cause of AES in India (ranging from 5%-35%). Herpes simplex virus, Influenza A virus, West Nile virus, Chandipura virus, mumps, measles, dengue, Parvovirus B4, enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus and scrub typhus, S.pneumoniae are the other causes of AES in sporadic and outbreak form in India. Nipah virus, Zika virus are also found as causative agents for AES. The etiology in a large number of AES cases still remains unidentified.last_img read more

3 awarded death penalty one 20yr jail for war crimes

first_imgwar crimesThe International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) on Tuesday sentenced three war criminals to death and one another to 20-year jail for crimes against humanity committed during the 1971 liberation war in Sudharampur upazila of Noakhali district.The three condemned convicts are – Amir Ahmed alias Amir Ali, Abul Kalam alias AKM Mansur, Md Joynul Abedin. Abdul Kuddus was sentenced to 20-year jail.Of them, Abul Kalam alias AKM Mansur has been on the run.A three-member ICT bench led by justice Md Shahinur Islam pronounced the verdict, said prosecutor Jahid Imam.Earlier on 6 February, the tribunal concluded the hearing of arguments from both sides on the trial of four men for their alleged involvement in crimes against humanity conducted during the liberation war in 1971 in Noakhali’s Sudharampur upazila and kept the verdict pending for any day.The prosecution pressed charges against five people, including the four in the war crimes case. As another accused of the case, M Yusuf, died after the pressing of the charges, the deceased was not indicted.On 20 June 2016, the tribunal framed three specific charges against four people for their alleged involvement in crimes.The investigators started the probe against the five suspected war criminals on 16 November 2014 and submitted a report before the prosecution on 31 August, 2015.Three charges include killing of over 100 people, including 41 of Sonapur and Sreepur villages, in Sudarampur upazila on 15 June 1971.last_img read more

Computer software sets new record for solving jigsaw puzzle

first_img Explore further © 2010 PhysOrg.com Assembling the jigsaw puzzle of drug addiction The graphical model, developed by Taeg Sang Cho and colleagues can solve puzzles of any image or photograph with a full range of colors, while the previous jigsaw solvers could only handle sharp images of limited colors. The previous record for jigsaw-solving by a computer was achieved in 2008 by a team of Danish scientists, and solved a puzzle consisting of 320 pieces. Their method used cartoons with clear structures and well-defined edges and sharp colors, and the pieces were cut in traditional shapes, which made it easier to solve than a puzzle in which every piece is square. In their experiments, the team chopped 5-megabyte pictures into 400 squares and fed the data from each into their computer software. The software analyzed the major colors in the squares and arranged them in groups of similar colors. It then referred to a database of images to arrange the pieces in their most likely positions to produce an initial low resolution image. So, for example, a puzzle with a mixture of green, gray and blue would be interpreted as a landscape and the software would first group the bright pieces and blue pieces at the top (since objects in or near the sky are generally brighter, and the sky is often blue), the gray in the middle, interpreted as buildings, and green in the foreground, interpreted as vegetation.When the pieces were arranged in their approximate positions the computer then checked the pixel colors on the boundaries of each piece and identified neighboring pieces that most closely matched the colors. The software fixed a small number of pieces, called anchor patches, and refined the layout for the remaining pieces to reconstruct the original picture. Using their system, the software was able to successfully reconstruct 20 test images, and could solve a 400-piece puzzle in only three minutes.Cho said that since the software is expert at finding pieces that blend well, it may help make edited pictures more realistic in the future. Cho also hopes the software could be useful for other scientific problems, such as DNA/RNA modeling or reassembling fragments of documents or archaeological relics, all of which can be modeled as jigsaw puzzles. The paper will be presented at the 2010 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) to be held in San Francisco on the 15th to 17th of June. (PhysOrg.com) — Completing jigsaw puzzles is a challenging and popular hobby, but now scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the U.S. and Tel Aviv University in Israel have for the first time developed a probabilistic graphical model to solve a jigsaw puzzle consisting of 400 square pieces. More information: Project website: people.csail.mit.edu/taegsang/JigsawPuzzle.html Two examples of reconstructed images using the estimated local evidence. Please see the original paper for details. Image: Taeg Sang Cho. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Computer software sets new record for solving jigsaw puzzle (2010, May 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-05-software-jigsaw-puzzle.htmllast_img read more