Police to monitor usage of pedestrian overpasses

first_imgThe Public Infrastructure Ministry is currently in the process of implementing measures which will enable Police to monitor the use of the pedestrian overpasses erected along the East Bank of Demerara.One of the new structuresThis is according to the subject Minister, David Patterson who told Guyana Times that these final works should be completed shortly to allow pedestrians to use the elevators.“The elevators are working, the elevators are installed (and) everything is completed but we just need to fully put them into operation. There is a security issue which we are addressing”.Patterson made it clear that the overpasses have no default and the Ministry is just trying to ensure that the commodity itself is secured as well as the pedestrians who will be using it.“You want to ensure that there is adequate security available 24 hours before it will be in use for 24 hours so that’s the only thing we are doing as we speak…the Police will be able to monitor the usage of the overpasses so that’s what we’re working out,” he added.When asked when the elevators will be operation he said “eminently”.To further ensure that the elevators are properly used, the Ministry in September last announced plans to train persons on the safe usage of the new structures.At present, there are five pedestrian overpasses located at Houston, Eccles, Peter’s Hall, Providence and Diamond.Ten lifts were sourced from Sweden earlier in 2018 and two were installed; one on each side of the crosswalk.Construction of the pedestrian overpasses commenced mid-2017 and was almost completed by December 2017.The contract for the overpasses at Houston, Eccles and Peter’s Hall was awarded to B&J Civil Works for the sum of US$1,034,326.Meanwhile, there were separate contracts for the Providence and Diamond overpasses which were both awarded to S Jagmohan Hardware Supplies and Construction Services to the tune of US$364,247 and US$364,727 respectively.Trinidadian supervision firm RM Engineering Ltd was recruited to oversee the construction of the overpasses.The introduction of these flyovers was intended not only to reduce the high level of road carnage but to eliminate traffic congestion along the East Bank Road, which is said to be the busiest in the country.While many concerns were raised about the time it takes to walk the flight of stairs, the Public Infrastructure Ministry noted previously that this guarantees safety.last_img read more

Ohio FFA Convention schedule

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 91st annual Ohio FFA State Convention and Expo is being held May 2nd and 3rd at the state fairgrounds in Columbus. FFA Chapters from across the state will be interviewing, competing, and recognized on stage. A complete schedule can be found here.last_img

NYC Results – Day Three

first_img18’s Boys kicked of the third day of games at 8am to decide places in the finals series.Cobras disposed of Northern Territory 10-0. 12th seed Western Tigers kept the Eagles to a 7-7 draw. North Queensland produced the upset of the round, beating 10th seed the Suns 12-0. 14th place Tasmania also did well to keep the 5th seed ACT to a 3-3 draw.The 18’s Girls were the second division to play their final round of games, at 9am. 19th seed South Australia narrowly lost to 7th seed Scorpions, 5-4. ACT did similar, just losing 4-2 to the Suns, a team seeded 12 places above them. Northern Territory beat NSWCIS 8-5 in an upset.The 1st seeded Suns easily beat the Cyclones 10-0 in the 20’s Girls final round. 6th seeds the Mets easily beat the 3rd seeded Sharks, winning 7-1. The Hornets did well to beat the 4th seed Eagles, winning 5-1. The other results in this round were predictable, with Tigers beating Victoria and the Cobras beating the Sunshine Coast.In the 20’s Boys, 9th seeded Sunshine Coast drew with the 1st seeded Mets with the Sharks just overcoming the Hornets, 9-8. Suns beat the Eagles, 8-2 and the Cyclones beat Victoria 6-4. ACT and Cobras fought out a tough match, with Cobras winning 10-9.In the first round of finals, the 18’s Boys, 1st seed the Mets were beaten by NSWCCC, 6-3. NSWCHS were too good for NSWCIS, winning 4 touchdowns to 1. Due to their strong wins, CCC will play CHS in semi final two at 9am Saturday morning in a battle of the NSW schools. QSST overcame the Sharks, 5-2 to progress to the finals while the 16th seeded Cyclones knocked Sunshine Coast out of the running, 13-5. The Cyclones, the surprise packet of the 18’s boys, will now play QSST at 9am in their bid to make the Grand Final. In the 18’s Girls, QSST put out their finals warning, beating 12th seed Central Queensland 9-1. Sharks were too good against Sunshine Coast, winning 5-0. QSST and the Sharks will now face off for their shot at the title, playing their Semi Final at 8am. NSWCCC showed no mercy against Northern Territory, putting on 15 touchdowns and only letting in 3. Despite the difference in rankings, the Eagles put up a good fight against NSWCHS, losing 6-3. Like in the Boys 18’s, the Girls semi final number 2 will be NSWCCC V NSWCHS.In the 20’s Boys, the Cobras proved too strong for the Hornets, winning 8-5. The Cobras will now play the Sharks in Semi Final One at 8am. ACT beat the 2nd seeded Suns, winning 8-7 and has set up a show down against the 1st seed Mets in Semi Final One also at 8am.In the 20’s Girls, the Mets were too good for Hornets, winning 9-4. They have now set up a play off against the 1st seeded Suns, to be played at 9am. The Sharks beat the Tigers 5-2 to book a spot in the Semi Finals against the Cobras also at 9am.last_img read more

Exceptionally serious Report says half of Canadian wildlife declining

first_imgAn extensive survey of 903 species of Canadian birds, fish, mammals, reptiles and amphibians over more than four decades has found that half of them are in serious population decline.Declining species lost a total of 83 per cent of their numbers between 1970 and 2014, says the report released Thursday by the World Wildlife Fund. Species protected by federal legislation shrank nearly as quickly as those that weren’t.“In general terms, the Species At Risk Act does not seem to have made any difference,” said WWF president David Miller. “There’s an incredible urgency to reverse the decline.”The Living Planet Index could be the most comprehensive assessment of wildlife numbers in Canada.The organization looked at 3,689 different populations of 386 kinds of birds, 365 fish species, 106 different mammals and 46 reptiles and amphibians. It combined more than 400 datasets from government, academe, industry and citizen science using a peer-reviewed method developed by the Zoological Society of London.Overall numbers for all 903 species decreased by eight per cent over the 44 years studied.A total of 45 species were stable and 407 increased. Many of those benefited from large-scale conservation measures.Waterfowl, which increased by 54 per cent, have enjoyed widespread wetland preservation. Birds such as falcons are no longer harmed by DDT and grew by 88 per cent.Others on the increase were generalist species such as deer or geese that live well alongside humans.The survey found a familiar combination of reasons for declining populations: habitat loss, climate change, invasive species and pollution.Miller said it was surprising to find legislation such as the Species At Risk Act, passed in 2004, has done nothing to slow the decline.“What the science says is that it hasn’t made a material difference to the species.”Species listed under the act declined by 63 per cent over the study period. As well, the study suggests the rate of decline may have actually picked up after the act was passed.Part of that is due to the time it takes for action. Miller points out the St. Lawrence beluga was known to be at risk even before the act was passed, yet it took until 2015 for protections to be put in place.“There have been incredible delays in taking the steps mandated under the act.”The legislation may no longer be the best tool to protect wildlife, said Miller. There are too many shrinking species to protect each one individually.“We probably need a different approach,” he said. “The challenges are so complex and have multiple causes. You can’t rely simply on a plan for species. You have to look at a whole ecosystem.”There isn’t, for example, much that can be done to halt the slow disappearance of Pacific killer whales until scientists understand why chinook salmon — the orca’s main food — are declining.It will take networks of protected areas to reverse the trends, said Miller. He noted the survey does show that a collective approach — such as that taken to protect waterfowl — can make a difference.But the breadth and speed of the decline means action must be taken quickly.“Even for us, it’s sobering to see the results,” Miller said.“The declines are exceptionally serious. We need real urgency to take action.”— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960last_img read more

PRRD suspends temporary entry permits for Old Fort evacuees

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Peace River Regional District has suspended all temporary entry permits for residents of the Old Fort subdivision until further notice.The PRRD announced on Monday afternoon that it would be issuing temporary entry permits for residents who had been out of their homes on Sunday when the evacuation order was issued, allowing them to access their homes and grab essentials such as medications, pets, food, and other supplies.The PRRD said that based on information that was given to its Emergency Operations Centre by a geotechnical engineer, the decision was made to suspend the permits due to the instability of the landslide. Scott Maxwell, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s executive director for the Peace Region, says that Sunday’s evacuation order was issued after the initial slide that occurred on September 30th triggered several other inactive landslide areas on either side of it to reactivate, leading to increasing instability in the slopes above the community.Maxwell said that the Ministry is using a helicopter to conduct LIDAR surveys of the landslide on a daily basis to monitor the slide’s movement and direction.last_img read more

Fort St John RCMP continue to remind residents to remove valuables from

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Fort St. John RCMP are continuing to remind residents to remove valuables from vehicles.Over the past month, RCMP say they have been receiving a high volume of reports of vehicles being broken into and valuables being stolen.The RCMP is reminding the public of the #9PMRoutine campaign to equip citizens to protect themselves and their possessions. According to Police, the #9PMRoutine is simple to follow as every night a 9:00 p.m., you go out to your vehicle to check to see that it is locked and that valuables are either removed or hidden from view.The RCMP say the biggest message of the #9PMRoutine is to secure your belongings as out of sight is out of mind.If you happen to be a victim of theft or witness suspicious activity, you can call the Fort St. John RCMP at 250-787-8100 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.last_img read more

Raj Guvs remarks supporting return of PM Modi violative of poll code

first_imgNew Delhi: Rajasthan Governor Kalyan Singh’s remarks supporting the return of Narendra Modi as prime minister are violative of model code of conduct, the Election Commission has concluded. Sources said since Singh holds a constitutional post, the EC will write to President Ram Nath Kovind, flagging the issue. The poll panel had examined the remarks made by the former Uttar Pradesh chief minister in the light of model code violation as holding a constitutional post makes him “apolitical”. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ Addressing BJP workers at his Aligarh residence on March 23, Singh reportedly said, “All of us are BJP workers and we want the party to win. We want Modiji to become the prime minister. It is necessary that Modiji becomes the PM again.” The Governor made these remarks to placate some agitated BJP members who gathered outside his house over ticket distribution. In the 1990s, the EC had expressed displeasure to then Himachal Pradesh Governor Gulsher Ahmed for campaigning for his son. He later quit.last_img read more

SER plans to run special trains

first_imgKolkata: The South Eastern Railway has decided to run 11 pairs of special trains between Shalimar andMumbai from April 20 to July 1 and another 11 pairs of special trains between Santragachi and New Jalpaiguri from April 21 to June 30 to clear the extra rush of passengers during summer. Trains get more passengers during summer as people plan trips during holidays. A weekly special train will leave Shalimar station at 6.10 am every Monday and will reach Mumbai at 4.05 pm on Tuesday. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaIn the opposite direction, the special train will leave Mumbai at 11.05 am every Saturday and will arrive at Shalimar at 9.30 pm the next day, Sunday. “The special train consisting of one AC 2 Tier, two AC 3-Tier, seven sleeper Class and three general second class coaches, will have stoppages at Santragachi, Kharagpur, Tatanagar, Chakradharpur, Rourkela, Jharsuguda, Bilaspur, Raipur, Durg, Gondia, Nagpur, Wardha, Badnera, Akola, Bhusawal, Nasik Road, Igatpuri, Kalyan and Dadar between Shalimar and Mumbai CSMT,” a senior SER official said. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwaySantragachi-New Jalpaiguri weekly AC special will be leaving Santragachi at 10.25 am every Sunday and will reach New Jalpaiguri at 8.55 pm, the same day. In the opposite direction, New Jalpaiguri-Santragachi special will leave New Jalpaiguri at 11.15 pm every Sunday and will arrive Santragachi at 11.15 am , the next day. This train will have sixteen AC 3-tier coaches and will have stoppages at Bardhaman, Rampurhat, Malda Town, Barsoi, Kishanganj and Alubari Road between Santragachi and New Jalpaiguri. Booking will be available for both the trains from Passenger Reservation System (PRS) and internet with immediate effect.last_img read more

The Disappointment Continues For Team USA

Austria42410-5.35.915.9 10South Korea4823.4+11.4 17Slovakia1320.3+3.3 CountryGoldSilverBronzeTotalvs. Exp.REMAININGFinal Sources: Sports-Reference.com, International Olympic Committee Kazakhstan010.30.2+1.2 Austria410-5.35.9+15.9 Sources: Sports-Reference.com, International Olympic Committee That shortfall is easily the worst gap for any country that has won at least one medal in Pyeongchang — and the U.S. doesn’t have a lot of time left to turn things around.Lindsey Vonn, a favorite in the women’s downhill skiing race, and both the women’s and men’s hockey teams have a chance to provide the U.S. with some measure of redemption. And if all else fails, there are still a few more snowboarding events on the schedule. But even if the Americans pick up the pace and play to their historical form for the rest of the games, our formula puts their total medal count at 26, which would barely clear Team USA’s uneven performance at the 2006 Olympics in Torino, Italy.And considering what we’ve seen in Pyeongchang so far, 14 more medals seems like a stretch. Through Tuesday’s action, 67 percent of this year’s medals have been awarded, meaning that the U.S. is technically on pace (based simply on how many they’ve won to this point this games) for about 18 medals total. That would be the fewest that U.S. athletes have earned in a winter games since they nabbed 13 at the 1998 Olympics in Nagano, Japan.No matter how you slice the numbers, this continues to be a highly disappointing showing for the U.S. in South Korea. 6United States53412-10.814.026.0 7Olympic athletes from Russia03811-1.95.316.3 6United States512-10.814+26.0 20Spain0220+2.0 China07-0.63.9+10.9 Ukraine1001+0.00.21.2 Italy2248+0.43.311.3 Finland0033-2.93.56.5 5France54413+2.74.417.4 12Sweden470.24.7+11.7 Belarus1102-0.91.03.0 16Great Britain1034+2.40.94.9 Australia0213+0.61.24.2 Slovenia01-1.20.8+1.8 20Spain0022+2.00.02.0 Who’s ahead of pace — or falling behind — in Pyeongchang?Actual and expected medal counts by country in the 2018 Winter Olympics 17Slovakia1203+2.00.33.3 Latvia01-0.50.2+1.2 Kazakhstan0011+0.30.21.2 23Liechtenstein0110+1.0 10South Korea4228+2.03.411.4 3Canada85619+2.711.930.9 4Netherlands65314+4.35.419.4 2Germany117523-2.99.432.4 Switzerland27-1.25.7+12.7 5France5132.74.4+17.4 1Norway11299.38.1+37.1 2Germany1123-2.99.4+32.4 Italy280.43.3+11.3 Poland1012-1.10.72.7 Latvia0011-0.50.21.2 Australia030.61.2+4.2 8Japan25310+4.91.811.8 It’s now clear that the United States is destined for a very subpar Winter Olympics. With just 12 total medals in the games so far, the Americans are currently sitting sixth in the medal count — a whopping 17 medals behind Norway, the overall leader.According to the simple medal tracker we introduced over the weekend, the U.S.’s tally is 10.8 fewer than we’d expect at this point in the Olympics. (Our analysis is based on how countries have done historically in the various Olympic sports.) CountryGoldTotalvs. Exp.REMAININGFinal Who’s ahead of pace — or falling behind — in Pyeongchang?Actual and expected medal counts by country in the 2018 Winter Olympics 3Canada8192.711.9+30.9 4Netherlands6144.35.4+19.4 16Great Britain142.40.9+4.9 Slovenia0101-1.20.81.8 12Sweden4307+0.24.711.7 Belarus12-0.91+3.0 Expected Medals 8Japan2104.91.8+11.8 Finland03-2.93.5+6.5 China0527-0.63.910.9 23Liechtenstein0011+1.00.01.0 Poland12-1.10.7+2.7 1Norway1110829+9.38.137.1 7Olympic athletes from Russia011-1.95.3+16.3 Ukraine1100.2+1.2 Switzerland2417-1.25.712.7 15Czech Republic1236+2.32.08.0 Expected Medals 15Czech Republic162.32+8.0 read more

Aspirations goals and dreams for graduation class of 2018

first_img Updated: 10:16 PM June 13, 2018 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — It’s graduation time! We thought it might be interesting to hear more from some of this year’s young graduates.“What are your plans for the future?” we asked.At James Madison High in Clairemont Mesa and at Clairemont High, some students talked about becoming engineers, veterinarians, and teachers. One young man said he would join the military and eventually try to get a job as an EMT-firefighter. Another graduating senior said he was going to join the electricians’ union, in preparation for starting a business as an electrician.One young woman said she hoped to become an environmental lawyer, and then the head of the Environmental Protection Agency. Many students said they would attend a local community college first and later transfer to San Diego State or another four-year university.Many students told us they were aware of the steeply rising costs of a college education. According to a 2014 national study, seven in ten college students had student loan debt, with an average of nearly $29,000 for each student borrower.We also asked the graduates who they credit for their passion and inspiration.Some said their friends and family helped them, while many gave the credit to their coaches and teachers. 6,000 students this week graduated from the 22 public high schools in the San Diego Unified School District.At the two high schools we visited, more than 90 percent said they planned to attend 2 to 4 year universities.To the class of 2018, we wish all of the young graduates throughout San Diego County much happiness and success! Aspirations, goals and dreams for graduation class of 2018 Sasha Foo, center_img Sasha Foo Posted: June 13, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more