USDA: Think grill safety this summer

first_imgBatesville, In. — For many Americans, the summer grilling and travel season begins this weekend. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service wants to make sure you and your family avoid food poisoning this summer.An estimated 128,000 Americans are hospitalized with food poisoning each year, but foodborne illnesses can be prevented during summer months by properly handling perishable foods during travel, and by using a food thermometer when grilling.More information is online here.last_img read more

New guide to help clubs attract more young players

first_img27 Feb 2019 New guide to help clubs attract more young players Tags: Club Support, growing the game, Junior Golf A new guide to help golf clubs gain greater understanding of young people and to attract them into the sport has been produced by England Golf.The potential is huge: England Golf research shows that in 2017, 67% of all young people took part in some form of golf activity. That’s about 5.35 million youngsters in England.But at the same time, they’re turning their backs on golf clubs and traditional junior memberships are dropping.Understanding Your Junior Market has been created to help reverse the trend. It forms part of a raft of measures identified in the wider national Children and Young People Plan “Growing the Game for the Future” which is supported by the Golf Foundation and the Professional Golfers’ Association.The guide highlights ways to find out what young people want from golf and golf clubs – and what could put them off. It uses the specially created profiles of seven different types of youngster to show how they and their parents view golf.A supporting video and online training are available to show clubs how to use the profiles to understand their current juniors and their families, create activities to attract new players, develop retention plans to keep their interest and market these successfully.Lee Dolby, England Golf’s Young People Manager, commented: “Attracting young people in to golf is essential for the future of golf clubs and, to do that successfully, they need a better understanding of what young people want from their golfing experience.“One size definitely does not fit all. Young people change faster than at any other time in life and what appeals to a six-year-old may not be right for a 16-year-old. But, many clubs still just offer one version of junior golf.“We need to think about the individuals, their motivations and the barriers they encounter. Traditional membership is dropping among young people; that doesn’t mean they don’t want to belong and feel part of a club, it does mean they don’t like what clubs are offering.“We want to work with clubs to create new and exciting ways to engage young people and inspire a love of golf which will last a lifetime.”Emily Furniss, from Gaudet Luce Golf Club in Worcestershire is a Young Ambassador for England Golf and the Golf Foundation, and has written a message to clubs in the guide.She comments: “Not everyone wants to be the next Rory McIlroy, some young people just want to belong, to make friends or play for fun. So listening to the opinions and needs of the next generation of golfers will broaden the appeal of the game.“This booklet is a great starting place for clubs to understand their young customers and we hope you’ll use it to take positive steps to get more young people into golf.”The new guide complements England Golf’s wider package of support for clubs, Understanding Your Market. This helps clubs retain members and identify potential new members by focussing on what their customers want.Click here to view Understanding Your Junior Market. For more advice contact your local Club Support Officer.Image copyright Leaderboard Photographylast_img read more

Reports Salesforce to Acquire Buddy Media for More Than 800 Million

first_imgIn a deal said to be worth over $800 million, CRM provider and cloud computing company Salesforce will purchase social media software provider Buddy Media. Originally reported by AllThingsD’s Peter Kafka, it’s believed Buddy Media accepted Salesforce’s bid over an offer from Google.Another report from TechCrunch says the $800 million price tag may be an underestimate, as Anthony Ha writes, “Now our sources say the price may be considerably higher depending on the equity component of the deal. That may put it more in the neighborhood of $1 billion.” The deal follows an overhaul of Buddy’s products, including a unified social data API; conversion, campaign and goal tracking across paid, owned and earned social media efforts; and a new mobile content development platform. The company also now offers a social application for Pinterest, as well as social media analytics through a partnership with comScore.The acquisition is drawing comparisons to Oracle’s recent acquisition of social media marketing group Vitrue, a deal valued at $300 million. The purchased companies both bring a social media component to businesses known for other services (Salesforce’s CRM is used by sellers throughout the publishing industry, while Oracle is best known for its software offerings). It also brings former Salesforce SVP of industry verticals Susan St. Ledger back to the company, as she now serves as Buddy Media’s president. This deal marks the second major acquisition for Salesforce in just over a year: The company purchased social network monitor Radian6 for $326 million in March 2011. Buddy Media is used throughout the magazine industry, with major players such as Rodale and Hearst signed on to its services. Prevention tapped Buddy to add sweepstakes and newsletter registration to its Facebook page, while Hearst partnered with the company to produce branded social media applications (“sapplets”) for several of its titles.last_img read more

Feds Yellen makes subtle shift in emphasis

first_imgFed’s Yellen makes subtle shift in emphasis1.5K viewsFed’s Yellen makes subtle shift in emphasis1.5K views00:00 / 00:00- 00:00:0000:00Fed’s Yellen makes subtle shift in emphasis1.5K viewsBusinessA subtle but powerful message adjustment from Fed Chair Janet Yellen speaking to the Senate Banking Committee about plans for the first interest rate hike since 2006: (SOUNDBITE) JANET YELLEN, CHAIRVentuno Web Player 4.50A subtle but powerful message adjustment from Fed Chair Janet Yellen speaking to the Senate Banking Committee about plans for the first interest rate hike since 2006: (SOUNDBITE) JANET YELLEN, CHAIRlast_img read more

Salvadorans Fear Their Country Not Prepared For Returnees

first_img Share Being deported to an El Salvador he hadn’t seen in more than three decades was a trauma Hugo Castro recalls clearly.The 51-year-old said Monday that his country must begin preparing now to receive the nearly 200,000 Salvadorans who may have to return following the Trump administration’s decision to lift their temporary protected status next year.“The main problem for deportees is that they’re made invisible. They’re rejected, there’s no work. They don’t help us,” said Castro, who was deported from the U.S. in 2015.The U.S. announcement brought fears that a major source of income for this poor Central American nation will be cut off and that families could be separated. But there was also a hint of optimism that Salvadorans with many years of experience in the U.S. could bring expertise and investment to spur the economy.Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Salvadorans who have stayed in the U.S. with temporary protected status — only a fraction of the estimated 2 million Salvadorans living there — would have to leave by Sept. 9, 2019, unless Congress came up with a solution allowing them to stay.Twitter via @MaryknollFrsBrsThe temporary protected status program has been offered to citizens from a number of countries fleeing natural disasters or other instability. The affected Salvadorans received the status after earthquakes in 2001 killed more than 1,000 people. Thousands more who arrived in the United States in recent years fleeing gang violence were not eligible.Castro went to the United States as a teenager to study at a college in Atlanta. During his junior year his family back home lost nearly everything when the bank seized their coffee operation. Dropping out, he worked at a country club and a book store and became manager of a Mexican restaurant. Then a run-in with police led to more than two years in immigration detention as he unsuccessfully fought deportation after living in the U.S. for three decades.His first three months back in El Salvador were the worst, he said. He suffered from depression and didn’t want to leave his mother’s home. People told him a 49-year-old man should not depend on his mother to support him, so he started looking for work.“I went everywhere, to restaurants. I told them I had a lot of experience and that I spoke English, but they rejected me,” he said.Eight months after arriving, Castro finally found work at the Salvadoran Immigrant Institute. The non-profit group recognized the value of Castro’s bilingualism and the experience he had gained through the deportation process and it put him to work helping other deportees reintegrate into society.Castro said programs like his are very limited and more needs to be done for returnees.“The government has to get ready, partner with businesses, with all of society, the nonprofits and create assistance programs,” he said.As an example, he noted that in 2016, the country received 52,000 deportees from the United States and Mexico. Meanwhile, a government program to give small cash grants to allow deportees to open their own businesses has only graduated 140 people, he said.The biggest worry among many Salvadorans is that their nation of 6.2 million people will see a big drop in the amount of cash sent home by countrymen working in the United States. Salvadorans transferred more than $4.5 billion from the U.S. in 2016, accounting for 17 percent of El Salvador’s economy, according to government figures.Luis Membreno, an economic analyst in El Salvador, said that fear may be overblown. He said Salvadorans who have protected status in the U.S. tend to be more long-standing migrants who have their families there and send less money home. Many more Salvadorans are not in the program, with growing numbers entering the U.S. illegally over the past decade fleeing violence and poverty.“I don’t think that family remittances are going to fall in the short term,” Membreno said.He also thinks some Salvadoran families in the U.S. could start sending more money back — something that started when Donald Trump was elected president — so remittance figures could rise.In addition, he said, many of those eventually returning could be skilled and have money to invest. “All of this could generate a certain dynamism in the economy,” he said.Cesar Rios, director of the nonprofit group where Castro works, is less optimistic. “Our country is not prepared to receive thousands of Salvadorans,” he said.Deportees are often targeted by gangs, because they believe they have money. Police also target them, because of the stigma that they are criminals.“There’s no work,” Rios said. “Between 200 and 300 Salvadorans continue leaving every day for the United States.”Ernesto Godoy, standing outside a Western Union money transfer office in San Salvador, said he receives money from relatives with protected status in the United States. He worried the decision could lead to bigger problems in El Salvador.“It’s going to affect us, not only me, but on a national level, because here in El Salvador we make ends meet with remittances from the United States,” Godoy said.last_img read more