Big time Customs Officer fined and fired for theft

first_img Police looking for band of eight robbers; Outten gets bail despite serious gun charges Recommended for you Turks & Caicos and United States team up for ‘Don’t Pack a Pest’ program Related Items:Clyde Scottie Glinton, customs department, supreme court, theft Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 23 Feb 2016 – Police today reveal that Clyde Scottie Glinton did not fight the charge of stealing from the Customs Department between November 2011 and January 2012.Glinton entered a guilty plea at Supreme Court in Provo.Over the three months, Scottie Glinton, once a senior Customs Officer at the Provo International Airport, took money which should have gone from the PIA to Customs Central Unit and pocketed it.Glinton was the officer in charge and the amount was $19,273.42.Glinton was on Monday (Feb 22)fined $25,000 and sentenced to three years in jail; the jail time is conditional so he will not serve the time but could if he finds himself in trouble with the law again.Clyde ‘Scottie’ Glinton has 90 days to pay the fine, else be imprisoned for 12 months.Generally, this is a fortunate break for the public officer who was arrested in connection to the theft in September 2013. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp 7 BAIC workers arrested for Theftlast_img read more

3 awarded death penalty one 20yr jail for war crimes

first_imgwar crimesThe International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) on Tuesday sentenced three war criminals to death and one another to 20-year jail for crimes against humanity committed during the 1971 liberation war in Sudharampur upazila of Noakhali district.The three condemned convicts are – Amir Ahmed alias Amir Ali, Abul Kalam alias AKM Mansur, Md Joynul Abedin. Abdul Kuddus was sentenced to 20-year jail.Of them, Abul Kalam alias AKM Mansur has been on the run.A three-member ICT bench led by justice Md Shahinur Islam pronounced the verdict, said prosecutor Jahid Imam.Earlier on 6 February, the tribunal concluded the hearing of arguments from both sides on the trial of four men for their alleged involvement in crimes against humanity conducted during the liberation war in 1971 in Noakhali’s Sudharampur upazila and kept the verdict pending for any day.The prosecution pressed charges against five people, including the four in the war crimes case. As another accused of the case, M Yusuf, died after the pressing of the charges, the deceased was not indicted.On 20 June 2016, the tribunal framed three specific charges against four people for their alleged involvement in crimes.The investigators started the probe against the five suspected war criminals on 16 November 2014 and submitted a report before the prosecution on 31 August, 2015.Three charges include killing of over 100 people, including 41 of Sonapur and Sreepur villages, in Sudarampur upazila on 15 June 1971.last_img read more

Metro Begins SafeTrack Closures Single Track Schedule

first_imgDespite a hotly contested debate between District Mayor Muriel Bowser and Metro executives, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) begins its SafeTrack repair and replacement program this weekend.Metro released its revised scheduled for almost a year of maintenance work that will require trains to share a track or take entire stretches of track out of service for weeks at a time. Click on the image to see a larger version. (Metro)The accelerated track work plan addresses safety recommendations and rehabilitations needed to ensure passenger safety and system wide efficiency.In accordance with the plan, as announced by WMATA General Manager Paul Wiedefeld in May, Metrorail would shutter at midnight on weekends and expand its weekday maintenance schedule by single-tracking certain lines and shutting down line segments for several weeks at a time.Bowser petitioned the transit agency in a five-page letter just days ago asking that alternatives be made to the plan which, she said, would adversely impact “the late night riders and nighttime workers who support and sustain the District’s economy.”  Metro Board Chairman Jack Evans dismissed the concern in an e-mailed statement.“As I can only say to the bars, restaurants, hotels: [Metrorail] will close at midnight. There is no option to not close at midnight. And we will work with everybody to try and figure out how we can provide, if possible, some alternative transportation methods,” Evans said.  “I think every jurisdiction, including the District, is raising issues with events, etc. that they have, that they would prefer not to have them disrupted, but as [Wiedefeld] said, ‘If I start accommodating one, we’re going to be back to where we started. And we’re never gonna get this done.’ So, this is my plan, as he said, and we’re sticking with it.”SafeTrack accelerates three years’ worth of work into approximately one year, using a “Safety Surge” method that shuts down entire segments of each line for extensive repair.  Due to reduced capacity and longer expected travel times, Metrorail riders are encouraged to consider using alternate travel options while safety surge work is scheduled on their line. Trains and platforms are expected to be extremely crowded during peak periods and customers may experience extended delays. During line segment shutdowns, limited shuttle bus service will replace trains between the shutdown zones.last_img read more

NASA must reinvest in nanotechnology research according to new Rice University paper

first_imgShare1David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduJeff Falk713-348-6775jfalk@rice.eduNASA must reinvest in nanotechnology research, according to new Rice University paperMatthews, Evans, Moloney and Carey: Nanotechnology will be critical to future missionsHOUSTON – (Oct. 16, 2012) – The United States may lose its leadership role in space to other countries unless it makes research and development funding and processes — especially in nanotechnology — a renewed and urgent priority, according to a new paper from Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.The paper, “NASA’s Relationship with Nanotechnology: Past, Present and Future Challenges,” investigates how NASA has both guided and defunded cutting-edge nanotechnology development since 1996 at its own research facilities and in its collaborations with university scientists and laboratories. The research was conducted by a team at Rice that included Baker Institute science and technology policy fellow Kirstin Matthews, current Rice graduate student Kenneth Evans and former graduate students Padraig Moloney and Brent Carey. The paper sheds light on a broad field that holds tremendous potential for improving space flight by reducing the weight of spacecraft and developing smaller and more accurate sensors.This area of research, however, saw a dramatic cutback from 2004 to 2007, when NASA reduced annual nanotechnology R&D expenditures from $47 million to $20 million. NASA is the only U.S. federal agency to scale back investment in this area, the authors found, and it’s part of an overall funding trend at NASA. From 2003 to 2010, while the total federal science research budget remained steady between $60 billion and $65 billion (in constant 2012 dollars), NASA’s research appropriations decreased more than 75 percent, from $6.62 billion to $1.55 billion.The authors argue that the agency should restructure, refocus and strengthen its R&D programs.“The United States currently lacks a national space policy that ensures the continuity of research and programs that build on existing capabilities to explore space, and that has defined steps for human and robotic exploration of low-Earth orbit, the moon and Mars,” Matthews said. “With Congress and the president wrestling over the budget each year, it is vital that NASA present a clear plan for science and technology R&D that is linked to all aspects of the agency. This includes connecting R&D, with nanotechnology as a lead area, to applications related to the agency’s missions.”The authors said that to effectively engage in new technology R&D, NASA should strengthen its research capacity and expertise by encouraging high-risk, high-reward projects to help support and shape the future of U.S. space exploration“Failure to make these changes, especially in a political climate of flat or reduced funding, poses substantial risk that the United States will lose its leadership role in space to other countries — most notably China, Germany, France, Japan and Israel — that make more effective use of their R&D investments,” Matthews said.-30-For more information or to schedule an interview with Matthews, Evans, Moloney or Carey, contact Jeff Falk, associate director of national media relations at Rice, at jfalk@rice.edu or 713-348-6775.Related materials:“NASA’s Relationship with Nanotechnology: Past, Present and Future Challenges” paper: www.bakerinstitute.org/policyreport54.Kirstin Matthews bio: http://bakerinstitute.org/personnel/fellows-scholars/kmatthews.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsFounded in 1993, the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University in Houston ranks among the top 20 university-affiliated think tanks globally and top 30 think tanks in the United States. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute sponsors more than 20 programs that conduct research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows and Rice University scholars. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog, http://blogs.chron.com/bakerblog. AddThislast_img read more